Mar 25, 2016
88
5
Status
Pre-Medical
Hey SDN

I just got the syllabus for my gen chem course (not the honors version, still debating whether to sign up for it lol). We start off with thermochem: think Hess' Law, Enthalpy, q=mCdeltat, stuff like that.

Is this normal?
 

studentdocftw

M4
2+ Year Member
Apr 30, 2015
1,335
1,379
Status
Medical Student
I wouldn't say its normal, in fact it's quite out of order compared to where we started. But Gen Chem thermo is straightforward, so don't be intimated. Now, actual thermodynamics, where you have to use calc and dif EQ to derive equations, that is another beast entirely. You will likely have to find the temperature water will be after adding x grams of ice cube, you'll be fine.
 
About the Ads

eteshoe

.......
2+ Year Member
Jan 4, 2016
2,261
2,574
Tethys, Saturn
Status
MD/PhD Student
Lol gen chem "thermo". OP don't worry - keep up w/ your reading, notes, and he and you'll be fine
 
  • Like
Reactions: GrapesofRath
OP
TheInstitute
Mar 25, 2016
88
5
Status
Pre-Medical
fellas the only things I am scared of are gravitational waves xD. srsly tho, i thought a gen chem course would start with atomic theory ahah
 

eteshoe

.......
2+ Year Member
Jan 4, 2016
2,261
2,574
Tethys, Saturn
Status
MD/PhD Student
Maybe your prof wants to keep you guys on your toes or maybe (s)he just wants to weed the class down a bit - all you can do is adapt and succeed
 

Lost In Transcription

reports of my assimilation are greatly exaggerated
2+ Year Member
Apr 2, 2016
2,515
2,271
Probably still at work
here wait, let me tell it to you:

1) heat travels from areas of high heat to low heat. Things of differing heat will eventually come to an equillibrium temperature:

It's a lot less scary than it sounds basically. If you still need help later, PM me. I TAed both this class and taught a small actual thermo class as well.
 
Last edited:
May 30, 2016
188
76
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
If your algebra skills aren't good, you might get wrecked by bad luck. It's like 4 formulas though.
 

aldol16

2+ Year Member
Nov 1, 2015
4,935
3,464
Status
Medical Student
Different professors will teach it in different ways and they are only expected to cover all the material the department sets - not the order. This might be difficult if you're using a traditional textbook that goes through the elements and periodic trends and atomic properties first, but in some ways, thermodynamics is an easy place to start because its laws are some of the simplest, most beautiful laws in the universe (on par with gravitation, in my opinion). So don't let the order of the course faze you.
 

Lawper

Cat-box cycle
Gold Donor
5+ Year Member
SDN Ambassador
Jun 17, 2014
39,037
113,255
space chat
forums.studentdoctor.net
Hey SDN

I just got the syllabus for my gen chem course (not the honors version, still debating whether to sign up for it lol). We start off with thermochem: think Hess' Law, Enthalpy, q=mCdeltat, stuff like that.

Is this normal?
You'll be fine. Your syllabus seems to have topics arranged out of order but you won't be dealing with stuff like this in gen chem:

 

Boogy'sChick15

2+ Year Member
Nov 9, 2015
194
219
Status
Pre-Medical
You'll be fine. Your syllabus seems to have topics arranged out of order but you won't be dealing with stuff like this in gen chem:

This brought back nightmares from thermodynamics. That was the second class I disliked the most, right behind physical mechanics.

Sent from my A0001 using SDN mobile
 

wizzed101

The Little Prince
May 20, 2016
812
344
You'll be fine. Your syllabus seems to have topics arranged out of order but you won't be dealing with stuff like this in gen chem:

And then on an exam, all you have to do is to assume that most of those terms are zero or constant.

You can also spend a couple of million dollars running a distillation column with a wrong mass balance for years. All you have to do is to tweak some parameters in a control panel and everything will be fineeeeeeeeeeeee :D :D :D :D Because your model, if perfected, is about 80% off from the real operation. 95% off is no big deal! Why do we need to change anything, it's been running just fineeeeeeeeeeeee for years!!!!

I surely love ChEE, much creative so science.
 
  • Like
Reactions: eteshoe

FutureOncologist

I support cancer... research
5+ Year Member
Jun 25, 2014
652
721
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Concept-based with just "plug-and-chug" word/math problems. Not hard at all. Though, to be fair, I never grasped it from Gen Chem (why I got a B in the class) and I had to essentially teach it to myself for the MCAT.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Roayer

eteshoe

.......
2+ Year Member
Jan 4, 2016
2,261
2,574
Tethys, Saturn
Status
MD/PhD Student
And then on an exam, all you have to do is to assume that most of those terms are zero or constant.

You can also spend a couple of million dollars running a distillation column with a wrong mass balance for years. All you have to do is to tweak some parameters in a control panel and everything will be fineeeeeeeeeeeee :D :D :D :D Because your model, if perfected, is about 80% off from the real operation. 95% off is no big deal! Why do we need to change anything, it's been running just fineeeeeeeeeeeee for years!!!!

I surely love ChEE, much creative so science.
One of my profs always used to say "within 20-30% is good enough for government work" lol
 

Lawper

Cat-box cycle
Gold Donor
5+ Year Member
SDN Ambassador
Jun 17, 2014
39,037
113,255
space chat
forums.studentdoctor.net
This brought back nightmares from thermodynamics. That was the second class I disliked the most, right behind physical mechanics.

Sent from my A0001 using SDN mobile
Sorry! :sorry::sorry:

And then on an exam, all you have to do is to assume that most of those terms are zero or constant.

You can also spend a couple of million dollars running a distillation column with a wrong mass balance for years. All you have to do is to tweak some parameters in a control panel and everything will be fineeeeeeeeeeeee :D :D :D :D Because your model, if perfected, is about 80% off from the real operation. 95% off is no big deal! Why do we need to change anything, it's been running just fineeeeeeeeeeeee for years!!!!

I surely love ChEE, much creative so science.
I agree. There's a lot of simplification and shortcuts in solving thermo problems, which is why Maxwell relations and Euler's cyclic chain rule (seen below) help a lot.



If anything, thermo basically helped me get a lot better dealing with partial derivatives.
 
  • Like
Reactions: eteshoe

eteshoe

.......
2+ Year Member
Jan 4, 2016
2,261
2,574
Tethys, Saturn
Status
MD/PhD Student
I agree. There's a lot of simplification and shortcuts in solving thermo problems, which is why Maxwell relations and Euler's cyclic chain rule (seen below) help a lot.



If anything, thermo basically helped me get a lot better dealing with partial derivatives.
Thermo and transport phenomena (heat/mass/fluids) really drilled those partials into my mind
 
About the Ads