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general chemistry - reductant and oxidant

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Monkeymaniac

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I understand that a reductant (reducing agent) is the compound containing an atom being oxidized (one that gives away electron(s)).

I think from a redox reaction H2O+HNO2 -> HNO3+2H+, we can see that a reductant HNO2 contains an atom that loses electonrs and atoms whose oxidattion states don't change- H and O having the same oxidation states whereas N losing electrons.

But does anyone know if there exists a reductant (or oxidant) that loses and gains electrons at the same time? If such compound exists, what do we call that compound?
 

boaz

shanah alef
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If it loses the same number of electrons as it gains there is no net gain, so it essentially doesn't take part in redox rxns, which means that it doesn't even deserve a name of it's own as far is we're concerned.

If the net is either gain or loss then it's either reduction or oxidation, respectively.
 

Tokspor

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If it loses the same number of electrons as it gains there is no net gain, so it essentially doesn't take part in redox rxns, which means that it doesn't even deserve a name of it's own as far is we're concerned.

If the net is either gain or loss then it's either reduction or oxidation, respectively.

But you also have to consider that the hydrogen from the H2O is oxidized. So would this be classified as a strictly oxidation reaction?
 
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