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general medical procedures

Discussion in 'Optometry' started by r_salis, Apr 19, 2002.

  1. r_salis

    r_salis SDN Supa-Mod Emmetrope
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    (I have no idea why I'm wondering about this right now, but...) -- what types of general medical procedures are covered in optometry school? Phlebotomy, blood pressure measurement, CPR, etc.?
     
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  3. cpw

    cpw It's a boy !!!
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    yes, yes, and um.. yes.

    We learn all three that you listed. CPR, phlebotomy, blood pressure, injections. (we have to know how to give injections incase a patient goes into anaphylactic shock in the office) OD's are also trying to get injection rights in certain states for certain simple medical procedures (chalazions and the like)

    I have to get my CPR licensing before I enter clinic next year.
    Hope this helps!
    :D
     
  4. TomOD

    TomOD Senior Member
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    Hello r_salis,

    I can tell you that I learned many "general medical procedures" in school...some more in-depth than others of course. I use it a great deal in my private practice which is devoted about 50% to ocular disease which covers the big 4.....Cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and macular degeneration.....and also the generic "Red Eye" (covering everything from a subconjunctival hemmorrhage to corneal ulcer/abrasions to pre-septal/orbital cellulitis).

    Learning to take a good blood pressure is important and actually performing the test is important when your in practice. Unfortuantely, alot of OD don't. In my office we find a few uncontrolled/undiagnosed hypertensive patients a month and they are referred to an internist or family doc. Sometimes you almost have to beg them to go or take them yourself. I find it very helpful to be able to take retinal photos and show them the HTN retinopathy affecting their eyes. Usually those hemmorrhages and exudates "wake them up".

    Anyway, BP is a simple test and should be done for just about everyone. It is sad fact that there are many people who never see a GP unless they are dying.

    I perform chalazion removal with a clamp, local injection (intralesional) and a cutterage but usually only after attempting Kenolog injection a few times. 80% of the time the steroid will resolve the chalzaion.

    We learned subconjunctival, intramuscular, subcutaneous and intravenous injections but realistically, it is VERY rarly required in routine or even secondary eye care procedures. The IV injection is only used in a few cases that come to mind immediately......flourscein angiography and intense antibiotic/steroid therapy requiring hospitalization (ie. orbital cellutis).

    Luckily I have never needed to use CPR (although I am certified) or ever had any go into shock.

    I believe I got off the subject a bit maybe. Pay attention in school. The medical procedures you learn will be important for you later unless you decide to play eye doctor at the local mall.

    Good luck
     
  5. r_salis

    r_salis SDN Supa-Mod Emmetrope
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    Thanks cpw and Tom! (And Tom, keep up your "off the subject" comments, they're great!)
     
  6. medstud721

    medstud721 Member
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    TomOD provides a great example of the "joke of optometry". Non-medical para-health profesionals with no board certification status attempting to mislead the public. Optoms aren't doctors--although they call themselves so, and they cannot legally take a blade to tissue. They thrive on misleading the public in attempt to gain respect--a respect they should not nor will ever have. The only thing they are worthy of respect in is the world of refracting. Sorry, but it's true.

    I myself will be specializing in ENT--damn sure I'll never let an optometrist touch one of my patients!!

    medstud MD2B
     
  7. cpw

    cpw It's a boy !!!
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    Tom is one of the most respected fonts of information on this board. I'm sure he knows the word is curretage and I believe it is legal in some states for OD's to do. (although, you'd have to ask Tom about NC as I only know Texas law) We spend many months in Ocular Disease clinics training for just such prodecures. So, any notion that we're not qualified is ludicrous.

    The only time you EVER post on SDN is to bash optometry. OD's ARE board certified!! We take the National BOARD Exam of Optometry. (NBEO) It's in Three steps remarkably similar to the USMLE in set up (although, granted does not cover the same material.. and rightly so)

    And since when do you have to use a blade to be a doctor?? No, we're not MD's and never claimed to be. But, your ignorance of the field is showing when you claim to know what OD's are qualified to do.

    Okay, now I have to go back to studying for finals. I'm done playing the troll's game.
     
  8. TomOD

    TomOD Senior Member
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    I'll play with you medstud...I'm sort of bored too. I apologize for the mis-spelling of "curretage". I do however perform said procedure once or twice a week. This last particular case was referred to my by a local board-certifed internist.

    Now even though I am a little bored today, please don't waste my time with stupid stuff. Give me something of substance so that at least I will have to try hard to make you look like an idiot. Like.....ask me how they get those little m's on the M&M's. Now that would make me think. <img border="0" alt="[Laughy]" title="" src="graemlins/laughy.gif" />
     
  9. acurarte

    acurarte Member
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    MEDSTUD

    Not that the name you have chosen to post on this thread demonstrates your class or lack there of, but perhaps if you tilt your head down you might be able to see past the nose that you carry so highly up in the air. Perhaps this is why you have chosen ENT? Some day, you may learn that it isn't the initials behind your name that make you a doctor!
     
  10. r_salis

    r_salis SDN Supa-Mod Emmetrope
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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by medstud721:
    "...you would know the correct word is curretage (as you use a currete to scoop out the chalazion material after incision)."
    medstud MD2B</font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Medstud, when you make a point to criticize someone on their spelling of a word, you might want to get it right yourself. The correct spelling is: curettage
     

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