KP2AZ

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This was just something I stumbled upon that I thought I'd share. I know this topic usually comes up in specific Residency forums asked by medical students, so I wanted to save y'all some time by having it all in one place.

Hope this helps

Average hourly compensation of full-time orthopedic surgeons (16,597)
Salary/income: $250
Benefits: $50
Total compensation: $300

Average hourly compensation of full-time noninterventional diagnostic radiologists (21,329)
Salary/income: $209
Benefits: $42
Total compensation: $251

Average hourly compensation of full-time gastroenterologists (11,593)
Salary/income: $208
Benefits: $42
Total compensation: $250

Average hourly compensation of full-time noninvasive cardiologists (9,616)
Salary/income: $205
Benefits: $41
Total compensation: $246

Average hourly compensation of full-time urologists (4,247)
Salary/income: $197
Benefits: $39
Total compensation: $236

Average hourly compensation of full-time dermatologists (3,071)
Salary/income: $187
Benefits: $37
Total compensation: $224

Average hourly compensation of full-time anesthesiologists (24,521)
Salary/income: $183
Benefits: $37
Total compensation: $220

Average hourly compensation of full-time otolaryngologists (4,832)
Salary/income: $180
Benefits: $36
Total compensation: $216

Average hourly compensation of full-time hematologists (3,734)
Salary/income: $179
Benefits: $36
Total compensation: $215

Average hourly compensation of full-time oncologists (2,867)
Salary/income: $170
Benefits: $34
Total compensation: $204

Average hourly compensation of full-time general surgeons (14,771)
Salary/income: $169
Benefits: $34
Total compensation: $203

Average hourly compensation of full-time ophthalmologists (4,542)
Salary/income: $149
Benefits: $30
Total compensation: $179

Average hourly compensation of full-time pulmonologists (4,928)
Salary/income: $149
Benefits: $30
Total compensation: $179

Average hourly compensation of full-time obstetricians/gynecologists (12,861)
Salary/income: $140
Benefits: $28
Total compensation: $168

Average hourly compensation of full-time nephrologists (2,973)
Salary/income: $133
Benefits: $27
Total compensation: $160

Average hourly compensation of full-time emergency physicians (26,245)
Salary/income: $133
Benefits: $27
Total compensation: $160

Average hourly compensation of full-time neurologists (10,125)
Salary/income: $128
Benefits: $26
Total compensation: $154

Average hourly compensation of full-time hospitalists (10,498)
Salary/income: $112
Benefits: $22
Total compensation: $134

Average hourly compensation of full-time internal medicine physicians (96,916)
Salary/income: $106
Benefits: $21
Total compensation: $127

Average hourly compensation of full-time occupational medicine physicians (1,680)
Salary/income: $106
Benefits: $21
Total compensation: $127

Average hourly compensation of full-time pediatricians (17,885)
Salary/income: $101
Benefits: $20
Total compensation: $121

Average hourly compensation of full-time psychiatrists (24,597)
Salary/income: $101
Benefits: $20
Total compensation: $121

Average hourly compensation of full-time family physicians (85,421)
Salary/income: $99
Benefits: $20
Total compensation: $119


Source:
http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/compensation-issues/72-statistics-on-hourly-physician-compensation.html
 
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May 9, 2015
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Not sure how accurate this is. The psych doc I rotated with charged 250/hr in his private practice + same hourly fee for any evals/forms that he was asked to do. I guess that minus office expenses etc...but that would be the case in many specialties.
 

kenjixshadow

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This list tells me that I shouldn't become a FP. $300 vs. $119 per hour -- a FP has to work 2.52 hrs to make as much as an ortho.

Btw, you missed neurosurgeon.
Average hourly compensation of full-time neurosurgeons (1,573)
Salary/income: $332
Benefits: $66
Total compensation: $398

This list was calculated based on 40 hrs work a week, not the total number of hours worked. An ortho works way more hrs compare to a FP. Hence, it is flawed.
 
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Mar 22, 2013
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How will these salaries/hour change in the next 5 years? Will there be a big decline in physician payment, increase or will it stay about the same for the next 20 years or so?
 
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KP2AZ

KP2AZ

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@kenjixshadow , do you find the amount listed for FP to be accurate? I'm interested in primary care, so I just want to know roughly what to expect. :idea:
 

kenjixshadow

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user3

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AZCOM posts salary data

2013 MEDIAN SALARIES IN THE WEST (VARIES BY SPECIALTY)-FROM MGMA PHYSICIANS COMPENSATION AND PRODUCTION SURVEY 2014 REPORT
  • Family Medicine(Without OB):$224,889
  • Family Medicine(with OB): $220,983
  • Pediatricians: $234,763
  • Internal Medicine: $241,874
  • General Surgeons: $405,743
  • Anesthesiologists: $419,383
  • Emergency Medicine: $350,934
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology: $342,028

https://www.midwestern.edu/programs-and-admission/az-osteopathic-medicine.html
 
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KP2AZ

KP2AZ

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AZCOM posts salary data

2013 MEDIAN SALARIES IN THE WEST (VARIES BY SPECIALTY)-FROM MGMA PHYSICIANS COMPENSATION AND PRODUCTION SURVEY 2014 REPORT
  • Family Medicine(Without OB):$224,889
  • Family Medicine(with OB): $220,983
  • Pediatricians: $234,763
  • Internal Medicine: $241,874
  • General Surgeons: $405,743
  • Anesthesiologists: $419,383
  • Emergency Medicine: $350,934
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology: $342,028

https://www.midwestern.edu/programs-and-admission/az-osteopathic-medicine.html
From my own schools web page. Well played.
 

Bones 2020

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Even FP makes 8x what I make right now :eek:
 

Trogghunter

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When you factor in malpractice insurance for the surgical specialists, the income can come down significantly
 
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Cubsfan10

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I think it should be well-known that money is more dependent on location, practice set-up, and personal drive more than your specialty. Yes, some specialties on average will garner higher wages but in general if your sole goal is to make money then you can do that in pretty much any field. There are neurosurgeons that are academic, work 20 hrs./week and make 200k/year and there are family med docs who work 80 hrs/week in clinic, office, and nursing homes that make 500-600k/year. It's just about your priorities.

With that said, some fields lend themselves to an easier dollar/hour schedule such as dermatology, rad onc, radiology, and ophtho.
 

Trogghunter

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And factor in no of days worked, 7 on 7 off less than half a year when you get holidays. Nocturnists can work 4d on 3 off with every 5th week a full week off.
 

user3

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I think it should be well-known that money is more dependent on location, practice set-up, and personal drive more than your specialty. Yes, some specialties on average will garner higher wages but in general if your sole goal is to make money then you can do that in pretty much any field. There are neurosurgeons that are academic, work 20 hrs./week and make 200k/year and there are family med docs who work 80 hrs/week in clinic, office, and nursing homes that make 500-600k/year. It's just about your priorities.

With that said, some fields lend themselves to an easier dollar/hour schedule such as dermatology, rad onc, radiology, and ophtho.
I have read though that the workload for radiologists can be quite brutal...
 
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KP2AZ

KP2AZ

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I have read though that the workload for radiologists can be quite brutal...
True, but there are a few radiologists I know who take their call from the comfort of their own home! Granted, call isn't the best thing in the world, but its a heck of a lot better in PJ's and your favorite mug with piping hot coffee.
 

Cubsfan10

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The workload can be brutal in some settings but 1. It's reading images and not doing surgery or h and ps and 2. It's more constant work type busy instead of long hour type busy. It's certainly not like it used to be but rads is still a great field compared to pretty much anything else.

The other major thing people don't think about when talking about salary is length of practice time.
For example, most EM docs are done after 15 years, surgeons after 20, but rads and path you can literally practice 40+ years without a decline in salary.
 

Dharma

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Don't think salary, since that is actually rare. Think compensation. Semantics out of the way, it will be much wiser to think in terms of how much an individual makes per hour (including paper work). Just looking at the numbers is not only misleading, but will likely leave one quite disappointed in the reality of how that money is acquired. Anyhow, my apologies if this has been addressed earlier.

Play smart.

EDIT: Those numbers above look quite suspect. I don't trust it.
 

Dharma

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Not sure how accurate this is. The psych doc I rotated with charged 250/hr in his private practice + same hourly fee for any evals/forms that he was asked to do. I guess that minus office expenses etc...but that would be the case in many specialties.
And his overhead is likely minuscule compared to just about any other speciality. So, more $ for our friendly psychiatrist. If he truly loves the work, jackpot!
 

NurWollen

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And his overhead is likely minuscule compared to just about any other speciality. So, more $ for our friendly psychiatrist. If he truly loves the work, jackpot!
For whatever reason, setting up a cash-only practice seems more common in psychiatry than for other specialties
 

wjs010

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No way in hell do anesthesiologists make that much
 
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KP2AZ

KP2AZ

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@wjs010 , I saw on another list that the average for an anesthesiologist was a little north of 350K/year. Not sure what the $/hour math adds up to. I'll see if I can find that list.
 

Mad Jack

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When you factor in malpractice insurance for the surgical specialists, the income can come down significantly
Malpractice is typically included in benefits, depending on your group our employment status. Around here virtually no one pays their own malpractice- unless they're in a very small PP, it's included in their group contact. That's a big part of why physicians have such large benefit costs.
 
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W19

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AZCOM posts salary data

2013 MEDIAN SALARIES IN THE WEST (VARIES BY SPECIALTY)-FROM MGMA PHYSICIANS COMPENSATION AND PRODUCTION SURVEY 2014 REPORT
  • Family Medicine(Without OB):$224,889
  • Family Medicine(with OB): $220,983
  • Pediatricians: $234,763
  • Internal Medicine: $241,874
  • General Surgeons: $405,743
  • Anesthesiologists: $419,383
  • Emergency Medicine: $350,934
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology: $342,028

https://www.midwestern.edu/programs-and-admission/az-osteopathic-medicine.html
That ObGyn salary is high... But the other salaries seem to be in-line with what I have seen out there.
 

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No way in hell do anesthesiologists make that much
I don't know if compensation has decreased drastically, but I worked with some gas doc from 2009-2011 and that 400k+/year average salary sans benefit is accurate. So their total compensation was probably in the 550k/year... Some of these guys had 10 weeks vacation per year... I thought that was insane!
 
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wjs010

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I don't know if compensation has declined drastically, but I worked with some gas doc from 2009-2011 and that 400k+/year average salary sans benefit is accurate. So their total compensation was probably in the 550k/year... Some of these guys had 10 weeks vacation per year... I thought that was insane!
Yea but I'm pretty sure the field has gone down drastically just in the past few years. Apparently it used to be a road specialty and now tons of attendings on this board are warning people it's not worth going into. I guess you could make that argument about a lot of fields if you don't have an interest in them... Just like you could think up every reason to stay if there's a specialty that truly calls you
 

user3

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I don't know if compensation has decreased drastically, but I worked with some gas doc from 2009-2011 and that 400k+/year average salary sans benefit is accurate. So their total compensation was probably in the 550k/year... Some of these guys had 10 weeks vacation per year... I thought that was insane!
my biggest concern with anesthesia is obamacare...
 

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my biggest concern with anesthesia is obamacare...
Anything about healthcare is so unpredictable right now; therefore, I would advise people not to worry about compensation too much and do whatever specialty they can see themselves doing for 25+ years and let other things take care of themselves...
 

Dr. Death

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Wondering why family med with ob pays less than family med without ob. Kind of a noob question I know
 
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KP2AZ

KP2AZ

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Wondering why family med with ob pays less than family med without ob. Kind of a noob question I know
I'm wondering if its because you net less due to higher malpractice?
 

BorntobeDO?

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I don't know if compensation has decreased drastically, but I worked with some gas doc from 2009-2011 and that 400k+/year average salary sans benefit is accurate. So their total compensation was probably in the 550k/year... Some of these guys had 10 weeks vacation per year... I thought that was insane!
It still 400K if you are okay doing 70+ days of 24 hour call a year and going 4:1 cRNA to MDDO ratio. The lifestyle is what is gone most IMO, the money is still there if you want, but you got to scrounge now.
 

Makati2008

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The workload can be brutal in some settings but 1. It's reading images and not doing surgery or h and ps and 2. It's more constant work type busy instead of long hour type busy. It's certainly not like it used to be but rads is still a great field compared to pretty much anything else.

The other major thing people don't think about when talking about salary is length of practice time.
For example, most EM docs are done after 15 years, surgeons after 20, but rads and path you can literally practice 40+ years without a decline in salary.
Wish I could meet those ER docs done after 15yrs.....
 

IlDestriero

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It still 400K if you are okay doing 70+ days of 24 hour call a year and going 4:1 cRNA to MDDO ratio. The lifestyle is what is gone most IMO, the money is still there if you want, but you got to scrounge now.
I don't work anywhere near that hard for that much. The money is absolutely still there. The anesthesia forum is full of doom and gloom, and the 3 biggest complainers are making way more than 400k, probably more than 600k. However they are working their asses off for it. If you take the level of call you noted and cover 4:1, in a private practice where you own the group, you would absolutely be at 600+ unless your practice was in a true rural or inner city community hospital with a very high Medicaid/charity care component. You can probably make that at 3:1 if you're efficient, have a good payer mix and don't take 12 weeks vacation.
The biggest current threat to anesthesia is the rapid spread of Anesthesia Management Companies. If all you want is 400k, you can find that easily and even in a good academic practice.
 

TwinsFan

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I don't work anywhere near that hard for that much. The money is absolutely still there. The anesthesia forum is full of doom and gloom, and the 3 biggest complainers are making way more than 400k, probably more than 600k. However they are working their asses off for it. If you take the level of call you noted and cover 4:1, in a private practice where you own the group, you would absolutely be at 600+ unless your practice was in a true rural or inner city community hospital with a very high Medicaid/charity care component. You can probably make that at 3:1 if you're efficient, have a good payer mix and don't take 12 weeks vacation.
The biggest current threat to anesthesia is the rapid spread of Anesthesia Management Companies. If all you want is 400k, you can find that easily and even in a good academic practice.
And every medical student said "I'm listening, tell us more..."
 

Ibn Alnafis MD

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I don't work anywhere near that hard for that much. The money is absolutely still there. The anesthesia forum is full of doom and gloom, and the 3 biggest complainers are making way more than 400k, probably more than 600k. However they are working their asses off for it. If you take the level of call you noted and cover 4:1, in a private practice where you own the group, you would absolutely be at 600+ unless your practice was in a true rural or inner city community hospital with a very high Medicaid/charity care component. You can probably make that at 3:1 if you're efficient, have a good payer mix and don't take 12 weeks vacation.
The biggest current threat to anesthesia is the rapid spread of Anesthesia Management Companies. If all you want is 400k, you can find that easily and even in a good academic practice.
:greedy::hungry::greedy::hungry:
 

Rekt

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I don't work anywhere near that hard for that much. The money is absolutely still there. The anesthesia forum is full of doom and gloom, and the 3 biggest complainers are making way more than 400k, probably more than 600k. However they are working their asses off for it. If you take the level of call you noted and cover 4:1, in a private practice where you own the group, you would absolutely be at 600+ unless your practice was in a true rural or inner city community hospital with a very high Medicaid/charity care component. You can probably make that at 3:1 if you're efficient, have a good payer mix and don't take 12 weeks vacation.
The biggest current threat to anesthesia is the rapid spread of Anesthesia Management Companies. If all you want is 400k, you can find that easily and even in a good academic practice.
Probably a dumb question, but are the AMCs similar to contract management groups for EM (EmCare, TeamHealth, etc)?