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General Surgery

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by wvumed2004, Dec 1, 2000.

  1. wvumed2004

    wvumed2004 Junior Member 10+ Year Member

    16
    0
    Jul 22, 2000
    WV
    I am just a first year young buck but I have been in debate with a few of my peers, so maybe you guys and gals can help me out. The question is: Are general surgery residencies as horrific and demanding as the rumors say. I have heard two sides, and obviously this this ? depends on different program and such but what are the things you people are hearing. Stories, rumors, and personal experiences are wanted. Thanks
     
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  3. psi1467

    psi1467 Senior Member 10+ Year Member

    138
    0
    Feb 4, 2000
    WV
    Wish I could help you out wvumed, but unfortunately I can't. I've seen you on here a couple of times, before and I just figured I'd say hey to a fellow Morgantownite. I've got a couple of friends from Weirton too. Small world I guess. Well take care.
     
  4. wvumed2004

    wvumed2004 Junior Member 10+ Year Member

    16
    0
    Jul 22, 2000
    WV
    psi1467:
    I guess it is a small world. Who do you know from Weirton? Are you a fellow wvumed? If so what year?
     
  5. psi1467

    psi1467 Senior Member 10+ Year Member

    138
    0
    Feb 4, 2000
    WV
    Hey wvumed. I probably shouldn't spout off any names of people from Weirton just out of respect for there anonymity. But I'd be more than happy to chit-chat via email if you'd like. Feel free to drop a line.
     
  6. Neurogirl

    Neurogirl Resident Extraordinaire 10+ Year Member

    367
    1
    Sep 29, 2000
    Haven't you heard the old joke?

    One surgical resident to another: What's wrong with q2 call? You miss half the interesting cases!

    Yes...surgery is a VERY demanding specialty.
     
  7. It has been my observation while on the interview trail for surgical residencies that yes it does depend on the program, but it also depends on the type of residents they attract. One program, which I will not identify here, seemed to thrive on its reputation of being hard on hours and fairly malignant. The residents almost seemed to enjoy complaining - even when some of us were doing more hours than they! Seems that its "macho" to complain about how much you work, and how hard you have it - and frankly, some people like that.

    The hours are long, but then they are for most residencies. The work load does vary by the program - I know that seems like a cop-out but frankly it makes a big difference if you're at a county hospital or VA that has no ancillary staff after hours or on weekends (so you have to do all the scut yourself), or at a community program which has call q4 and some which have it q2, but then there's no cross cover.

    Most of the stories you'll hear are anecdotal and will have little relevance to your experience. I could tell you the story of a friend I have who dropped out of his surgical residency because he never saw his family (he's doing Peds now), but that doesn't mean that will happen to you. Being organized helps, and choosing the best program for you does as well. I recall seeing some books written about being a surgical intern, but they were always about people at places like BWH or some other hotbed. No one ever writes about being at a small town community program with little trauma experience - maybe I'll be the first!
     
  8. Z

    Z

    This is the most common misconception about surgical residency...."It is going to be so hard". Well, I can speak from first hand experience, it is difficult. However, there are several things to keep in mind. Most residencies are hard. I have friends in residencies other than surgery that work as hard aas I do at times. Also, you must keep residency training in perspective. It is only 3 or 4 or 5 or 10 years of your life. (OK not 10 years for most of us). You will be practicing medicine and able to set your own schedule for the rest of your life. If you really want to be a surgeon then you shouldn't let the fear of a little hard work for a defined amount of time get in your way.
    I would suggest exploring opportunities in your community or at your school to follow a surgeon around once or twice a month. That way you can get an idea about what it is like to be a surgeon in the real world.
    I also have to agree with one of the other posts. The amount of work one does in a residency is highly dependent upon the place you choose to do your training. Some programs are notoriously malignant. Others are more progressive. That is what the interview process is all about. It lets you get a sense of what it is like to be at the program. Talk to the residents there. They are the best resource to find out what life is really like. Hope this helps.
     

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