Get a MPT and graduate earlier or get a DPT? Bad to do clinicals abroad?

Jul 4, 2013
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Physical Therapy Student
I recently was accepted to a DPT program that starts in June, however I was just offered an interview with Robert Gordon U (in Scotland but CAPTE accredited) to start their MPT program in January. I have some concerns, obviously.

If I'm offered a spot and choose to attend RGU, I'll graduate 1.5 years earlier, and I understand I can start working as soon as I pass the NPTE. Tuition at RGU is ~21k/yr. The school I've been offered a spot at that starts in June is a DPT program and should be roughly 10k/yr. Financially, either sounds like a great option and I'm not really sure which would be smarter in that respect. However, I'm a bit concerned mainly about two things:

First, will getting a MPT rather than a DPT in an industry that's largely changing towards DPT make it more difficult for me to find a job or find my ideal job? RGU has a transfer option to do your final year at NAU, but I thought, money-wise, it'd be more beneficial to start working immediately (if possible) while getting my t-DPT part time. Is this a bad idea?

Second, I've read on here that the most important thing potential employers look at for new graduates is where you do your clinicals. Will it hurt me to have done almost all of my clinicals in the UK?

Which school would you advise I attend, if given the chance to choose between the two?

I started to raise these questions in the "Self-study program" thread, and did a little searching online regarding it but all the posts regarding the MPT vs DPT debate are from 2009-2010, which I'm worried will be a little outdated. As for RGU in general, there's basically nothing on here. If this belongs in the pre-PT forum, I apologize. I plan to cross-post there, so just let me know. Thank you in advance!
 

NewDPT31

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a)nobody really cares where you did your clinicals, just as long as you have experience in that particular field(OP, IP, etc). unless you want to work somewhere really prestigious.

b)I would say DPT, but let's assume you do the one in scotland. Done 1.5 years earlier? Assuming you pass on time, pass boards, etc...you are looking at what, 15 months or so faster into the workforce. That's potentially $75-85k more you could earn in that time frame(depends on region). Something to think about, at least.
 

NewTestament

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I agree with Azimuthal. With all new graduates earning a doctorate, why take another route? Get your DPT to be safe.
 
OP
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Jul 4, 2013
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Physical Therapy Student
DPT. Why complicate things?
It might be more financially intelligent and it could be a fantastic experience - I've always wanted to study abroad. Also, at 24, I feel like I need to start working ASAP and earning an income. I could get a 1.5 year jump on my career if I go this route.
a)nobody really cares where you did your clinicals, just as long as you have experience in that particular field(OP, IP, etc). unless you want to work somewhere really prestigious.

b)I would say DPT, but let's assume you do the one in scotland. Done 1.5 years earlier? Assuming you pass on time, pass boards, etc...you are looking at what, 15 months or so faster into the workforce. That's potentially $75-85k more you could earn in that time frame(depends on region). Something to think about, at least.
Out of curiosity, why do you still say DPT despite being able to get out earlier and start gaining experience and earning an income 18 months earlier? I got accepted 20 minutes after my interview, I'm really struggling with this decision, especially because it's so time-sensitive.
 
OP
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Jul 4, 2013
136
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Physical Therapy Student
I agree with Azimuthal. With all new graduates earning a doctorate, why take another route? Get your DPT to be safe.
What benefit is there to have a DPT over a MPT? Would I be at a disadvantage in any way? Especially if I enroll in a tDPT program right after I pass the NPTE and start working? Is there a chance I wouldn't get into one?
 

NewDPT31

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What benefit is there to have a DPT over a MPT? Would I be at a disadvantage in any way? Especially if I enroll in a tDPT program right after I pass the NPTE and start working? Is there a chance I wouldn't get into one?
Actually I hadn't thought about tDPT. That's a good idea.
I said DPT just because I'm biased. haha. If you plan on doing tDPT any of your worries should be forgotten.
I studied abroad in Undergrad, and it was the greatest experience of my life. Now you have me wishing I had gone there! Another potential benefit would be that it would then be easier for you to get your license in the UK countries...in case you really like it and want to stay over there(or head to Aus/NZ)

The ONLY concern would be loans. I'm not sure you can get federal loans to study in Scotland. I honestly do not know.
 

SuperKirby

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I would go the MPT route. I was rejected to the MPT schools so I had to attend a DPT school. I wanted to be done in 2 years and work early. Just get the tDPT later when it is actually required, and the tDPT will be very relatively easy to obtain! I wish I could've went the MPT route.

Besides most schools only offering DPT degrees, till today I still don't understand why people want the DPT so much!?

You'll graduate 1.5 years earlier, thats $60-$120K extra in your lifetime. Assuming you'll have no problems getting the US NPTE license, just go the MPT route.
 
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OP
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Jul 4, 2013
136
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Physical Therapy Student
Actually I hadn't thought about tDPT. That's a good idea.
I said DPT just because I'm biased. haha. If you plan on doing tDPT any of your worries should be forgotten.
I studied abroad in Undergrad, and it was the greatest experience of my life. Now you have me wishing I had gone there! Another potential benefit would be that it would then be easier for you to get your license in the UK countries...in case you really like it and want to stay over there(or head to Aus/NZ)

The ONLY concern would be loans. I'm not sure you can get federal loans to study in Scotland. I honestly do not know.
Thanks for bringing that up, I hadn't thought of that yet. According to their website, I can get federal loans.
You raise some good points. There's so much to think about...
 

NewTestament

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What benefit is there to have a DPT over a MPT? Would I be at a disadvantage in any way? Especially if I enroll in a tDPT program right after I pass the NPTE and start working? Is there a chance I wouldn't get into one?
I can't say for sure. As long as the pass rate for the program you're applying to is high, then I guess it shouldn't be a problem. It's just that everyone else applying for a job has gone through three years of schooling already, and you haven't.

Kevin
 

Azimuthal

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You experience 1 other culture. Ands it's not even that different. Joining the military would offer more life perspective, if that's what you're after. Heck, come to Oakland or South Central, you'll get to experience culture.

As for the additional income, you're going to be paying additionally for your tDPT anyways. Look at the NAU transfer tuition: >$32k. Take away taxes and living expenses and your advantage is very little, if any. There are cheaper schools but I don't see the difference being worth it when you calculate all your expenses for international travel, etc. The pound eats the dollar. I just want to throw those out there because sometimes, things aren't as transparent as they seem.

But it sounds like you made up your mind. In the end, you'll be a PT and that's all that matters. Good luck in your decision.
 

jesspt

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I can't say for sure. As long as the pass rate for the program you're applying to is high, then I guess it shouldn't be a problem. It's just that everyone else applying for a job has gone through three years of schooling already, and you haven't.

Kevin

But everyone will have passed the same test, right? The one that actually matters, and allows you to obtain a license, get a provider number, become part of an insurance network, and make money?
 

NewDPT31

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But everyone will have passed the same test, right? The one that actually matters, and allows you to obtain a license, get a provider number, become part of an insurance network, and make money?
Exactly. Nobody realizes until they graduate and start doing interviews that the length of school and in most instances where you go doesn't matter. A USC grad doesn't get reimbursed more than "insert school here" grad.
 

NewTestament

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But everyone will have passed the same test, right? The one that actually matters, and allows you to obtain a license, get a provider number, become part of an insurance network, and make money?
Again, I'm not sure if employers will discount the MPT because it only required two years of schooling.
 
OP
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Jul 4, 2013
136
23
Status
Physical Therapy Student
As for the additional income, you're going to be paying additionally for your tDPT anyways. Look at the NAU transfer tuition: >$32k. Take away taxes and living expenses and your advantage is very little, if any. There are cheaper schools but I don't see the difference being worth it when you calculate all your expenses for international travel, etc. The pound eats the dollar. I just want to throw those out there because sometimes, things aren't as transparent as they seem.
For anyone looking at this in the future, the NAU tuition is actually listed $15k. The $32k estimate includes living expenses and such.

In any case, thanks everyone for the input and all the ideas and different perspectives! After considering all the aspects, I decided to stay stateside. I appreciate the help! :)