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Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by Satellite, Mar 26, 1999.

  1. Satellite

    Satellite Member
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    I am preparing to take my medical pre-reqs. My background includes:
    Bachelor's in Comp Sci
    Overall GPA of 3.1
    PHY/Calc(full year of both) GPA of 3.4.
    Completed degree over a 10 yr period while working full time. Several dropped classes.
    Have not taken any Bio or Chem.
    My question is:
    Is it in my best interest to attend a prestigous Post-Bac or get a grad degree before applying or should I just take my pre-reqs at my local 4 year school(Oregon Institute of Technology)? Your opinions would be appreciated...

    P.S. I am most interested in DO and have a buddy who just got into Kirksville if anyone needs info. [​IMG]
     
  2. Satellite

    Satellite Member
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    Almost forgot. I am volunteering at a local hospital and I know several of the Science professors at OIT personally so I believe good recommendations could be obtained.
     
  3. Diane E

    Diane E Member
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    I would suggest just taking the prerequsites needed for school. If you want to become a physician getting a MS degree or participating in a post-bac program is not necessary and will only cost you more $$ down the road. I have an MS but I wanted to deliniate if I wanted to do medical research or become a physician. As it sounds like you already have made this decision, may I suggest focusing on ONLY taking your needed courses for Osteopathic schools, call AACOMAS to get the needed courses. Usually its 2 semsters of Biology, Chemistry, Physicis, Organic Chemistry, English, etc.. Some schools also require 8 semester hours of Behavioral Sciences i.e. Psychology.
    Good luck and keep posting to the group for suggestions.
    [​IMG] Diane
    P.S. Don't forget to get your pre-medical committee interview and letter established 1 yr before you apply to schools-- a lot of people forget to do this until the last min.

    ------------------


    [This message has been edited by Diane E (edited 03-26-99).]

    [This message has been edited by Diane E (edited 03-26-99).]
     
  4. Satellite

    Satellite Member
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    Thanks Diane. You are right I had pretty much made up my decision but it is nice to see some comfirmation.
     
  5. almasque

    almasque Member
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    Sattelite, I too took the "non-traditional" route, and was recently accepted for the incoming class at CCOM. I worked a full-time demanding career while completing a B.A. in Psychology. After completeing my Bachelors, I decided the med school route. I returned to my local college and completed the recommended science minnimums of 1 year of Chemistry, 1 year Physics, 1 year of Biology, and 1 year of Organic Chemistry. I can assure you it was very hard balancing school and a demanding career (great preparation juggling the time constraints of medical school). Those were the minnimums which apply for most schools, but I would suggest you examine the prerequisites of any schools you might have an interest. You might want to also consider a study course for the MCAT, but make sure you have the time to dedicate to the course or it will be a waste of your money. If you truly want to go to med school, do not be discouraged! My med school adviser was very negative about my prospect to get into med school because I was not the traditional student. But I was not disuaded and stayed the course. Good luck.


     
  6. Satellite

    Satellite Member
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    Thanks Almasque. Did you finish your med school req's in one yr or two? I already have the physics but still need the chem, ochem and bio. I think I am going to do it over 2 years so as to allow time for MCAT preperation.

    Bio/Chem year 1
    O-Chem/MCAT year 2
    Any thoughts?

    Full time work definitely pulls me towards 2.
    Thanks in advance.
     
  7. Kansai

    Kansai Member
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    Hi Satellite,

    I'm another non-traditional student and reading your first post reminded me of my own situation. I also considered a post-bac program because I was told by an admissions counselor at an allopathic school that community colleges were taboo. Unfortunately, I work full-time in telecommunications and couldn't just leave during the day to go to a more prestigious school. I ended up taking my science prereqs at a local community college. I even took the MCAT without having completed Physics, Chem or OChem (don't think I'd recommend that to anyone, though). I was only able to take a max of 2 classes each semester and took no classes (other than Kaplan prep) during the MCAT spring semester. It took me a long time to complete everything and at times this was very frustrating. The bottom line is that D.O. schools didn't care about the community college and I got accepted to 2 schools. Being non-traditional was an asset when I was interviewing. My grades/scores were never discussed, but everyone wanted to talk to me about my life experiences. Congratulations on your decision to pursue medicine and the best of luck to you!

    Stef
    UOMHS '03
     
  8. almasque

    almasque Member
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    Satellite

    I completed my post-bac science course over a two year period as follows:
    1st year: Chemistry (2 semesters)
    Biology & Microbiology (took Micro B during a summer course)
    Physics (2 semesters)
    2nd year: Organic Chem (2 semesters)
    studied for the MCAT

    That schedule worked well for me because O Chem was my hardest course by far, so having the "extra" time the second year helped, it also allowed me time to study for the MCAT. Also, I took these courses at a community college which was really my only option because of location and my schedule. I felt the rest of my application was strong.

    One aspect I liked about CCOM's application procedure was that once you were selected for an interview you were considered to have made the academic requirements. The interview panel only had access to the applicant's biographical info, as well as responses to a questionnare which was part of the application. The interviwers made their decision based solely upon the interview as they were not allowed access to academic information.

    The interviewers also advised me that DO schools tend to be more open to the non-traditional student. They stated about 1/3 of CCOM students come from the non-traditional route.

    Hope that helps, if you have any other questions you can e-mail me (Kelly Cain) at "[email protected]"

     
  9. Satellite

    Satellite Member
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    Thanks for all the great input.
     
  10. Eric Ryan

    Eric Ryan Junior Member

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    Satellite,
    I to am a "non-traditional" student currently in the process of preparing for osteopathic medical school. I am majoring in exercise science. My major exposed me to the world of clinical health care through cardiac rehabilitation, and through observing different occupations I discovered the osteopathic profession, and I haven't looked back. I think that like some of the other posts have mentioned, it may be difficult at first to find support from others in your field. No one in my major (teachers, advisors, students) has ever attempted going to medical school, and thus do not support my attempts to attend medical school. It seems like you are a qualified student (I hope that I have a 3.4 average from my physics classes after I take them). I think that making contacts at this point is extremely important. Although DOs are not very prevalent in my region, I have managed to make contacts and develop a working relationship with 13 DOs in the surroundings counties. I know that this many recommendations is not necessary, but information that they can provide and contacts that they have may prove very useful in applying to medical school. As for me I have a 3.48 cumulative, with a 4.0 in my last two years, and a 4.0 in my biology course work. I am planning to take my two chemistrys and physics courses along with my senior curriculum next year. Then after doing my internship in cardiac rehabilitation that following summer, I will go back to school for another year of study in organic chemistry, and I will probably try to take some other courses that are recommended but not required by medical schools (Genetics, Micro-biology, biochemistry). I am hoping that by taking this extra year, it will allow for adequate preparation time for the MCAT. So if that is an option to you, I would probably advise it. Anyway, cograts on deciding on an ostesopathic medical education. Good luck in your efforts.
     
  11. Satellite

    Satellite Member
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    Thanks for the info Eric.

    I am definitely taking the 2 year route mainly to prep for the MCAT.

    Make sure when you take your Physics classes to ask about the Prof. I took Calculus based Physics and there were 3 Professors teaching the course. I asked around and everybody agreed that 1 certain Prof. was the way to go. I ended up putting Physics off until my final year in college to get that Prof. and it really paid off. (2A's and a B).

    As for DO's:
    I live in a small town in Oregon where there is only 1 DO within a 70 mile radius. Luckily, my buddy who is going to KCOM knows many DO's in the Portland area and is making some introductions for me.

    Good Luck!


     
  12. DO 2 be

    DO 2 be Member
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    Satellite,
    You don't have to do anything. Just call Lori Haxton at KCOM and told her I refer you and you'll be in. No pre-reqs needed. Seriously. Guaranteed.

    (Just kidding. It's April's Fool, you know?)

    Btw, others already have great inputs so just add one more thing: make sure you are very prepared for the MCAT before you take it. Try to hit 30+ and you'll have a very good chance. Good luck. :)
     
  13. Ron

    Ron Junior Member

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    I am in a similiar boat, heading back to school at age 35. It makes me feel better to know that everyone that applies to med. school is'nt <25 and gods gift to medical schools (gpa- 4.0, mcats 30+).

    ------------------

    Ron
     
  14. Ron

    Ron Junior Member

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    For some reason my message was cut off, as i was saying, i'm not 25 with a gpa- 4.0 and mcats>30 but i sure as hell work my butt off for the 3.4 gpa i carry now. The closest college to me is 60 miles away, it makes for a long drive during the winter months, plus working full time. The school is a community college also,i am hoping this wont matter when it comes time to apply.
     
  15. OldManDave

    OldManDave Fossil Bouncer Emeritus
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    As a fellow non-trad, the DO schools seem to respect us for what we have had to go through to get to a point where we can apply to med school. I am 33, a practicing pediatric resp therapist [9+yrs] with very CRAPPY old grades...ie: 12~15 year old crappy grades. I returned to Ugrad world at 29...and have done well, will grad magna cum laude in May, BS in Neuroscience. But it has taken an unbelievable amount of fortitude from both my wife and myself.

    The amazing part...prob shouldn't be amazing, is that I was snubbed by all but 1 allopathic school [1 interview with a rejection out of 25 applications]vs 2 interviews [1 alternate list-UHS and 1 I don't know yet-KCOM]at the osteo schools. I only applied to 5 DO programs!! Believe me, if it is necessary, I will predominantly apply to DO schools next cycle!!

    Just for a little kicker, the AMA not too long ago published a survey [see Iserson's book on How to get into a residency] of praticing MDs. An astounding 39% said they would NOT have become physicians if they knew as pre-meds what life as a Doc was like. So much for recruiting all those young'ins huh? Becoming a Doc puts most so far in debt that they have little choice about stepping away. In addition, med school training doesn't exactly cross over to other career fields.

    I mean, no offense to the younger set, how in the world can you write an meaningful essay on the things in your life that have spurred you to aspire to become a physician when you haven't lived a life yet? I'll grant you, there are a few exceptions; but the figure of 39% of unhappy Docs should wake some folks on the admissions committees up!!



    ------------------
    'Old Man Dave'
    Senior, Neurosciences
    Univ of Texas at Dallas
    Class of 1999

     
  16. Satellite

    Satellite Member
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    Thanks for the input. OMDave I am blown away that you were snubbed by all of the allopathic schools. I am not sure how you did on the MCAT's but your current grades are obviously stellar. In addition, I have read many of your postings to this site and you communicate very well.

    I think that shows that there is still a huge element of chance with the whole application process.

    I spoke with a buddy of mine who is going to KCOM and he suggested if you get snubbed by all that you contact the schools you interviewed at and find out why. He is also and older student who started college in his mid twenties and does not expect to finish residency until his late thirties.

    Good luck!
     
  17. VM

    VM Senior Member
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    I too am non-traditional. I believe the osteopathic medical schools were much more receptive to me, although I have interviewed (and been wait-listed) at allopathic medical programs. The M.D. programs seemed to focus only on grades, and MCAT scores. They focused on grades I got when I was a freshman in college! Since returning to pursue medicine my GPA is extremely high. St. Louis University even asked me my SAT scores and ranking in my high school class. I am a much different person now. Heck, I didn't even study for the SAT and still scored pretty good (good enough for Purdue Engineering). Unfortunately, I have found that it is hard to get rid of some of the "baggage" of ones previous academic life, even if the bad grades were scored when you were 18 years old. You just have to point out in your essay your improvement (just to get an interview), and during your interview accentuate your positives. It can be overcome. I am now accepted, still have a few interviews, and am waiting for news from other schools, too. This is my second application to medical school. Good luck. As President Clinton says, "I feel your pain."
     

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