May 4, 2009
3
0
Status
Psychology Student
I'm almost finish my psychology degree and I really want to take a master's of science in a neuroscience program.

How likely is it that I could get into a science grad program with an arts degree?

There is a bio psychology degree that is offered at my school which would give me a science degree. The only problem is that if I take all the required courses for the bio psychology program it will extend my undergrad schooling by at least a year, which is something I don't really want to do.

So is it possible to get into a science grad program with an arts degree or should I take an extra year as an undergrad to get a science degree?
 

thewesternsky

10+ Year Member
Jan 30, 2007
786
76
Status
Post Doc
This varies by program. Depending on your geographic constraints and research interests, you may or may not be able to find good-fit MSc programs in neuroscience that accept students with B.A.s. However, your B.A. is less likely to be a problem than your lack of prerequisites, so you may be able to get away with taking (for example) 3-4 specific prereqs for a program. Your best bet is likely to check into the admission requirements/prereqs on individual program websites, and contact admin or faculty if necessary.
 

Psychology 76

10+ Year Member
Jan 22, 2009
289
1
Status
Psychology Student
This varies by program. Depending on your geographic constraints and research interests, you may or may not be able to find good-fit MSc programs in neuroscience that accept students with B.A.s. However, your B.A. is less likely to be a problem than your lack of prerequisites, so you may be able to get away with taking (for example) 3-4 specific prereqs for a program. Your best bet is likely to check into the admission requirements/prereqs on individual program websites, and contact admin or faculty if necessary.
+1

B.A. and B.S. are really just letters. Yes, sometimes they do really mean a B.A. in psychology is more humanistic and existential courses and a B.S. is more biopsych and cognition course. But the most important thing is what courses you have taken and what research you have done. I'm getting a B.A. in psych I take the most science based courses I can so it's misleading.
 

blindblonde

U.S. citizen, Dutch Ph.D
10+ Year Member
Jan 21, 2007
246
0
Groningen, Netherlands
Status
Psychology Student
+1

B.A. and B.S. are really just letters. Yes, sometimes they do really mean a B.A. in psychology is more humanistic and existential courses and a B.S. is more biopsych and cognition course. But the most important thing is what courses you have taken and what research you have done. I'm getting a B.A. in psych I take the most science based courses I can so it's misleading.
I agree. I have a B.A. and a M.A., but I definitely have had a rigorous research background. B.A./B.S is just a formality of whatever the school opted to place their psychology program...it does not always reflect more or less science/research focus. Just make sure you look at the program's focus and see if you have coursework that fits what they are looking for in applicants.

Good luck! :luck: