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getting into medicine through junior college?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by thebadguy1999, Aug 5, 2006.

  1. thebadguy1999

    thebadguy1999 Member
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    okay maybe someone has done this and can share some advice or someone who wants to share their advice can also share it.

    I am 10th grade about to be in 11th and my only desire is medicine and a family. I was thinking that maybe instead of going to 12th grade after 11th grade I can just go straight to junior college for 2 years and then transfer to a university and from there just go along with my goal, pre-med>med-school>residency program. I would really like to save 1 year of my life and one year of hard work for my mom.

    is this a bad idea?
    will colleges see it as a bad thing?
    will med-schools think its bad?
    is just getting a g.e.d. to do this fine?
     
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  3. WantsThisBad

    WantsThisBad Member
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    I will reply to this tomorrow, Im too tired right now...but check it tomorrow cuz i have something to say about this. Goodnight.
     
  4. braluk

    braluk SDN Surgerynator
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    alot of med schools dont necessarily have a bachelor's degree as a requirement to get into med school, but generally it seems that as an unspoken rule, the majority of students that are accepted are those with a bachelors degree. Coming from a junior college may not necessarily hurt if you ace ALL your classes, and then go into a university and do just as well. (Im not sure if you're saying you're going to transfer from a 2 year JC to 1 year undergrad to finish). It also seems that being too young might hinder your chances of getting into school- alot of questions about "how much does he know at such a young age, how can he really show his commitment" might come into play- after all they question premeds who went throught the traditional route- theyll probably ask you the same, if not more (average age for matriculants seem to be 24- 25 so it seems that alot of students tend to be older, more mature, and know more about life then people who are younger). However, we've seen on the SDN boards, people who graduated from JC and then went to undergrad and subsequently get into med school (although maybe not as young), so more power to you, if you go through the sameroute. Good luck
     
  5. salmanjafri

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    I left high school two years early (right after my sophomore year) and started attending a junior college. Now I'm in the process of transfering to a four year and I'll probably spend three years there. I havn't taken the MCAT yet, and I'm still relatively new to all of this, so I can't offer much advice.

    I took the CHSPE (California High School Proficiency Exam) to leave early. I bet you can leave with a GED as well, but I'm not to sure.
     
  6. braluk

    braluk SDN Surgerynator
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    good job! i mean the idea really is, if you hit all their prereqs right on the bell, do well on the mcat and have good EC's and PS, as well as LOR's, you stand the same chance as anyone else. IF you get a smart aleck interviewer, he or she might call you out and put you down- but practices like these are more descriptive of stress interviews, which dont seem to be practiced widely as much.
     
  7. braluk

    braluk SDN Surgerynator
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    by the way
    <----1000th post :)
     
  8. NonTradMed

    NonTradMed Perpetual Student
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    There are posters here who've successfully completed their education through JC and then gone onto four year schools before going to med school. But I think most also finished high school the normal way. I'm not sure if the average med school will look kindly upon deliberately doing a GED and JC just to complete school a year early.

    From what I've read on these posts, people who do the JC route typically have economic reasons for doing it. In other words, just doing this to save time may look like you were looking for an 'easier' route to get your stuff done.

    Frankly, given how competitive med school is, why bother putting yourself at this type of disadvantage. Your plan is doable, but I don't think it is a good route to go for.

    If you really want to save time, kick ass in school and do well on your SAT and get into one of those 7 year BS/MD programs. This way, you save your one year, and get into med school.
     
  9. Hoberto

    Hoberto Squirrel Girl
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    There are some combined BS/MD programs you might want to look into as well. You'd be accepted to college and med school while still in high school. Most programs have minimum GPA requirements and whatnot but it sounds like a possible option for you.

    AAMC listing of combined programs

    Here are the schools that offer such programs:

    Albany Medical College
    University of Florida College of Medicine
    George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences
    Howard University College of Medicine
    Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University
    University of Kentucky College of Medicine
    University of Miami School of Medicine
    Meharry Medical College
    University of Nebraska College of Medicine
    Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California
    UMDNJ--New Jersey Medical School
    Wayne State University School of Medicine
    University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health
    Brown Medical School
    University of South Florida College of Medicine
    Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University
    The Texas A & M University System Health Science Center College of Medicine
    East Tennessee State University James H. Quillen College of Medicine
    Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine
    Drexel University College of Medicine
    Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine
    Temple University School of Medicine
    Boston University School of Medicine
    UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
    Stony Brook University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine
    Tufts University School of Medicine
    University of Connecticut School of Medicine
    University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
    The Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Franklin U-Med & Sci
    University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
    Michigan State University College of Human Medicine
    University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine
    University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
    Northwestern University, The Feinberg School of Medicine
    Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine
     
  10. WantsThisBad

    WantsThisBad Member
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    I left high school before even finishing my freshman year, due to health problems. I attempted to repeat my freshman year but my illness had me missing too much class. I took the time off to get better and it worked, I’m am doing really well now. Last summer I got my GED (Which I found to be funny that I could pass it without studying without any high school education, but that’s another topic). Last fall I started at the community college near me. I decided to pursue medicine after my first semester, and am now on my way to transferring to a 4 year school. The point is...If you have a good reason for doing it and you transfer and continue doing well...I think med schools will mostly care about how you did at your 4 years school, and on all your pre reqs. I think that if you're one year from graduating that its worth just sticking it out and applying to go directly to a 4 years school. If I had been able to go to high school then I would have. I think you shouldn’t waste the 3 years you have already spent working. - Nick
     
  11. drjewel

    drjewel Junior Member
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    You have to be careful, since some medical schools don't look favorably on community college courses to fulfill their prerequisites (you'd probably need to check individual websites to find out exactly what their policy is). Also, cc courses may not adequately prepare you to take something like the MCAT. Trying to fit in as many courses as you can (in order to graduate early) could detract from the rest of your resume (i.e. extra-curriculars, research opportunities, etc.)

    In addition, as much as you seem career driven, I think you may regret hurrying through high school and college later on in life. I am applying for med school now, at the age of 24, having been out of college for two years. Those years have helped me to mature and gain some perspective... I'm just trying to say that it can't hurt to take some extra time, allow yourself to grow up, and make sure it's really what you want.
     
  12. HigHal320

    HigHal320 Junior Member
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    Like what braluk said; going from JC to a 4-year university probably won't hurt you if you can show consistency in getting good grades at both places. However, there is one thing that you should consider; if you don't plan to take a year off after undergrad., then you'll have to apply to med school in the spring semester of your junior year. That means you'll have only taken a year of classes at the 4-year univ. I know that a lot of transfer students decided to take a year off and apply in the spring of their senior year so they have 2 years worth of courses to show med school. That extra year also gives them more time to work on their EC at the 4-year (like research and student body group) and most importantly, their LOR from the 4-year univ. (I'm personally doing the one year off way)

    I know you want to save time by going through the GED -->JC -->4year route so I think you probably should also consider the extra time that you may need after you transfer to a 4year institute. If you don't want any downtime even after undergrad, then the best way of course is to go directly to a 4year univ. and work on those EC (But would be more costly). Yet I'm not sure if you can do that with GED. Maybe GED + SATI & II?
     
  13. relentless11

    relentless11 Going broke and loving it
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    If grades are fine I see no outstanding problems with it. However there are a few schools (very few) that do not accept pre-reqs taken at a community college. Some other schools encourage taking pre-reqs at a 4-year university, but do not specifically frown upon community college work in general. All in all, if you can afford to go to a 4-year university, than do it. Regardless, where ever you go, do well, and continue to challenge yourself, i think thats the most important thing.

    From a personal life perspective, I'd actually just finish high school. My upperclassman years were the most memorable, and could not be replaced by any moment found in college life. For some becoming a physician may be their goal, but some of the physicians who I met that went the traditional route (e.g., med school right after getting their BS/BA degree) wished they actually took a year off. I can only imagine that this feeling may be amplified in the case of the OP. But to each their own. I'm taking my time;). MD by 2012? :D
     
  14. notdeadyet

    notdeadyet Still in California
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    If you're tired of high school, I can comletely relate. I hated high school myself. But I very much doubt your mother in any way wants you to drop out.

    Rushing = Bad. True for med school applications. True for almost everything in life.

    Burning bridges when you don't have to is a bad idea. Dropping out of high school is a very big burnt bridge. Can you get in to med school after going to junior college? Yes. Will it be easier if you apply as a student who completed four years at a university? YES.

    You need to do everything to hedge your bets. Medical school is very competitive. It's getting more so. Intentionally dropping out of high school can not help your application to medical school in any way.

    Yes.
    I don't know if they'll see it as a bad thing, but there's no way they'll see it as a good thing.
    See above.
    You can apply to medical school with a GED. You can apply to medical school without a BA. But neither one is a good idea.
     
  15. notdeadyet

    notdeadyet Still in California
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    To many, this will look like taking the easy way out. Not a good impression to make.

    Do not make this decision based on advice on this forum (including mine). Some folks are still in college themselves; asking about how a decision will impact the rest of their life doesn't quite work. Some folks are many years out of high school; we may lack perspective for how much high school really sucks.

    Please talk to the type of medical school that you want to attend. Ask them if they think that dropping out of high school, taking the GED, and going to community college is a good idea. I personally think that you'll find that the resounding answer will be "no".
     
  16. Nebuloso

    Nebuloso Member
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    I think this is a great plan. I went to a junior college/community college for my first two years and then transferred to a four year university where I did most all of the pre-med stuff. I just got accepted into med school so, from my experience, it is entirely possible to go this route. Do make sure you take the heavy classes at the 4-year university (you can take care of all those basic humanities type etc. courses at the CC). Good Luck!!
     
  17. Wackie

    Wackie Inappropriate, always
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    Finish high school. Walk across the stage and recieve your diploma with the rest of your class. Then, go to college and finish. Walk across that stage and get your degree. Then, go to med school and walk across that stage. It's good exercise and your mom will love attending the ceremonies. :D


    Seriously, finish high school.
     
  18. notdeadyet

    notdeadyet Still in California
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    Excellent...
     
  19. SeaAngel45

    SeaAngel45 Member
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    get into a combined BS/MD thing and you will save a year or two...
     
  20. thebadguy1999

    thebadguy1999 Member
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    okay it's not really about saving time. It's about having to spend almost 6 grand on private school and I come from a family of a single parent with a low income.

    also i didn't mean g.e.d.>jc>4years i meant-----g.e.d.>jc(2 years)>university(2 years)

    what exactly is BS/MD?

    I would really like to go to transfer to ucla after jc and perhaps go to Med-School at ucla.
     
  21. notdeadyet

    notdeadyet Still in California
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    If you're that caught up about money spent on going to a private school, go to a public school. I'm sure dropping out looks attractive, but it's not a good idea.
     
  22. DrewFromVA

    DrewFromVA Member
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    This thread caught my eye because I remember asking a similar thing several years ago right here on SDN... I was homeschooled throughout highschool and never officially graduated. I didn't receive a high-school diploma or get a GED. So, I went to a community college for a couple years, and then went on to a university (with several detours along the way!) I did my best to maintain good grades (as I'm sure we all do), and long story short, I'll be attending EVMS this fall. Orientation a week from today - Yikes! So good luck in whatever you decide to do :)
     
  23. sfnix

    sfnix Member
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    BS/MD i think is your best route. it allows for dual acceptance into both the undergrad institution and the med school. First 3 years, you take the prereqs and other science courses along with other classes. Your fourth year (senior year) will then be your first year of med school. saves you that one year your looking to eliminate and this is a much more reliable option.

    also, i think you might find that once you get to a 4 year university, $ will not be such a burden. Single parent incomes typically get a lot of help from the Financial Aid dept. I had a g/f who got enough $ in grants that she was basically being paid to go to school (i.e.- enough $ to cover tuition, housing, food, then some extra). she was from a single parent home. call UCLA financial aid and tell them what your unique situation is, i'm sure being that you're a "youngster" already looking into this they'll be happy to talk to you.

    p.s.- my advice is don't skip out on your senior year. You have a lot of life left to live whether you realize it or not. i know your mom might be struggling right now, but i can almost guarantee that life will be easier for everyone if you stick it out in school. I was in a very similar situation after my mom passed and it just my dad and 2 kids. don't regret taking my route at all and neither does he.
     
  24. mvenus929

    Physician 10+ Year Member

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    I really think you should graduate high school. Does your school allow you to graduate a semester early? I know many kids at our school could because the only thing we were required to have 4 credits of was English, which could only be taken once a year, so that was fulfilled in the first semester of senior year. If your school won't allow you to graduate early, see if you can do a dual-enrollment program, where you go to a local community college and get credit both there and at your high school, thus getting both college credit and your high school diploma.

    I'm sure several people have gone the GED route, but I think a high school diploma is more valuable. Go for it, and if the financial burden of going to a private school is that difficult, switch to a public school. They really aren't all that bad. And as someone said above, typically you can get lots of need-based aid in college for single parent households. Plus, there's tons of scholarships out there that you can apply to.
     
  25. greggth

    greggth Senior Member
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    You should graduate from high school. If you are ambitious, take courses at the junior college during your senior year- classes like biology, chemistry, calculus, physics, English-- so you can get As in those courses when you get to college.
    Or use the opportunity to do something interesting- do some volunteer work, get an interesting job, travel to someplace interesting... so that you can talk about this experience on your applications later.

     

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