Dismiss Notice
SDN members see fewer ads and full resolution images. Join our non-profit community!

Getting Published?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Compass, Jul 24, 2006.

  1. Compass

    Compass Squishy
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Messages:
    3,363
    Likes Received:
    3
    I have a general idea of what this is, but I'm a little confused at what we are defining this as...

    If you are "getting published," does this mean you are primary author, only author, or possibly second author or a tack-on (you did research, but didn't help write)?

    If you get published in your university's publishing for student papers, does this count as the "getting published" we speak of here, or must it be from a non-affiliated with you source?

    Finally, does your "getting published" have to deal with medicine directly or can it relate to topics partial to medicine, such as a new health care system, or can it be about something different entirely like why Edgar Allan Poe was an underground techno artist? (I can't think of any examples)

    Clarification for this would help much. TY :)
     
  2. Thread continues after this sponsor message. SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Johnny_one_eye

    Johnny_one_eye Phleboptimist

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2006
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    In general "getting published" means being an author on a peer-reviewed journal. It does not mean being first and/or only author since few undergrads would be first author on their papers (I think). For example, I have 2 publications in JACS (third author and second author). However, being published in a university publication would still be significant, just probably wouldn't hold as much weight as in a peer-reviewed journal, since this generally signifies credibility and quality of work. Also, being published does not have to be strictly in the basic sciences or relate to medicine. You can definitely be published in other areas of research (english, social science, etc) or for other things like creative writing (someone publishes your short story in the New Yorker or something :) )
     
  4. Law2Doc

    Law2Doc 5K+ Member
    Physician Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2004
    Messages:
    31,007
    Likes Received:
    9,844
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    It still counts as a valuable EC and is worth listing, but you definitely don't get the same bang for the buck, or impress interviewers as much with non-health/non-research publications. At least that was my experience/impression.
     
  5. What about presentations? If you present a poster at an AAAS meeting, for example, as an undergrad, how much weight is that given?
     
  6. Compass

    Compass Squishy
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Messages:
    3,363
    Likes Received:
    3
    Oh moogly, if presentations counted, I'd be writing it all over my application.
     
  7. relentless11

    relentless11 Going broke and loving it
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2001
    Messages:
    1,588
    Likes Received:
    8
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Well sorta kinda here. Presentations sometimes yield an abstract, and that is technically a publication too. Not to mention book chapters, and so forth. As an undergrad I did a presentation for AACC, and that yielded an abstract. I also was first author for a book chapter back during the undergrad days so don't limit yourself to journal articles.

    Of course journal articles >> abstract;). I can't really say where book chapters fit since its like comparing apples and oranges. However the most important thing to have/know is knowing your research backwards and forwards. Its impressive to have publications, but if you know jack about it, then you're pretty much screwed.
     
  8. Moogly? :laugh: I guess that's a no?
     
  9. Okay, so Journal Articles>Abstracts>Presentations basically? I mean, I basically have all 3, so I guess I'm good. I was just curious as to whether it's worth mentioning.
     
  10. Compass

    Compass Squishy
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Messages:
    3,363
    Likes Received:
    3
    I don't know. But if yes, moogly moogly.
     
  11. riceman04

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2005
    Messages:
    8,506
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Medical Student

    congrats on your accomplishments...but I am curious as to how the fact you already have the other two has to do with presenting. Or did you feel just a little insecure at some point during that post?

    just curious :)
     
  12. CptCrunch

    CptCrunch Senior Member
    Physician

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2005
    Messages:
    788
    Likes Received:
    17
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Great googly moogly! I'm guessing if it's peer-reviewed then it's worth mentioning.
     
  13. dittozip

    dittozip Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2006
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    any adcom can see right through listing an abstract as a publication. list the presentation as an activity if that is what you have to show for your research. but listing an abstract is bs. should i list the listing i got in the local newspaper when i was 10 for a homerun I hit as a publication. come on people.....

    if you dont know what a publication is, then you have not done enough research.
     
  14. relentless11

    relentless11 Going broke and loving it
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2001
    Messages:
    1,588
    Likes Received:
    8
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    In the graduate/professional world you will not publish the abstract yes, but at the level of a pre-med who may have other things to do, I myself, my PI, and the adcoms that I have met have encouraged other undergraduates to do so. Some people only put in enough time to get an abstract.

    As an undergrad I presented at the American Association of Clinical Chemistry's (AACC) national meeting, and the presented abstracts were published in their journal, Clinical Chemistry. Abstracts for such meetings are reviewed, although not as strict as for an original article to a journal, it isn't a piece of cake either. So yes, that is a publication, and if thats all you have then that is sufficient, especially considering if you have other things to back you up.

    In this day and age, having adcoms "see right through" putting an abstract on the publication list is the least of ones concerns. Publications are regardless of how exciting they are, are extracurriculars and play only one role in getting you into med school. However in my years as a undergrad and now a PhD student, I have seen undergrads with MANY publications. Currently my own personal undergrads that I mentor each have at least 1 publication. One will be first author in their upcoming second publication in a peer-reviewed journal, and all five doing some presentation at the national or local level in the coming months. In essence, publications our becoming quite a common commodity, but the fact remains, do YOU know your research. You can be first author on anything, but when asked a question about your research, and you blow it, then they'll definately see through that. Personally I adcoms can care less if you have abstracts, publications, presentations on your application. What you got out of research, and what the rest of your application (GPA, MCAT, LORs, etc) plays a bigger role. Of course if you are doing MD/PhD then that totally changes the story, and having an original article published is worth more;)
     
  15. Thread continues after this sponsor message. SDN Members do not see this ad.

  16. Compass

    Compass Squishy
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Messages:
    3,363
    Likes Received:
    3
    Is a presentation with poster as a capstone of my internship something to put?
     
  17. Quix

    Quix Herr Professor
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2006
    Messages:
    2,660
    Likes Received:
    7
    Status:
    Academic Administration
    I wish I had read this before submitting my AMCAS file.

    I listed an article for which I was the first author in the American Journal of Bioethics, hospital panel discussions (on medical futility), guest lecturing for classes (medical/nursing students) and a number of presentations/posters (my doctoral defense, a psychiatric Grand Rounds I gave, and a number of presentations I gave for hospital ethics committees (for CME credit)).
     
  18. Get over yourself. I asked if a presentation was worth mentioning, not if it was a publication.
     
  19. What's wrong with that? I'm not feeling bad about listing things I'm proud of because three people on SDN thing it's beneath them.

    BTW, sorry for bringing this thread up three pages. That far gone, it probably would have been better to just let it die.
     
  20. relentless11

    relentless11 Going broke and loving it
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2001
    Messages:
    1,588
    Likes Received:
    8
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Heh, I think dittozip was just confused that applying to an MD program is as publication intensive as a PhD program or MSTP;). I still stand by my statement that abstracts are still publications considering many are published in peer-reviewed journals, however I don't think an adcom is going to give a rat's behind about if you put an abstract or a 1st/2nd/3rd author publication. What will happen is they might ask you that during interviews, but beyond that, it probably won't play a huge role for primary applications compared to
    GPA/MCAT and personal statement. Like every other extracurricular you put on the primary its taken as a grain of salt.

    Just do what you like, put your extracurriculars in a logical and reasonable place on your AMCAS application, but obviously be truthful, and be ready to answer questions in detail during interviews. :)
     
  21. dr.z

    Physician

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2004
    Messages:
    4,095
    Likes Received:
    4
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    If it is at a scientific meeting it definitely counts. It's not publication, but something people put on their C.V.
     
  22. ADeadLois

    ADeadLois Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2005
    Messages:
    3,162
    Likes Received:
    5
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Get over yourself. An abstract is a publication; I'm a co-author on several and they appeared in peer-review journals. I was not involved on the presentation, so I'm listing it as a publication.
     
  23. Compass

    Compass Squishy
    Moderator Emeritus

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    Messages:
    3,363
    Likes Received:
    3
    So... what about my capstone presentation?
     
  24. That's all I wanted to know. Thank you. :)
     

Share This Page