give up cardiac as hospital employed for a private practice fee for service opportunity, thoughts??

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RU2003

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future is always uncertain either way? but what reasons? would cardiac skills being better for future pay or marketability or risk giving up cardiac skills and do do general private priactice?
 
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aneftp

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As long as u have cardiac fellowship and echo boarded. U will be fine giving up cardiac aneshesia.

While many hospitals require 50 hearts experience within 2 years for credendialing. Many can fudge it if u decide to jump
Back and u can be proctored for 5-10 cases and will be fine.
 
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AdmiralChz

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I've had several friends and acquaintances transition back and forth between cardiac and non-cardiac jobs based on local market changes, most are fellowship trained but some not (most of the latter are a bit older before fellowships were widespread).

For those looking to go in reverse (have a fellowship, but weren't doing cardiac in a while for whatever reason), if there is some concern about TEE skills you could go to a dedicated echo conference as an intensive refresher (SCA Echo Week is probably best, but I believe there are other more regional conferences out there).
 

SaltyDog

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Dude, you really have to provide more details. Not all FFS PP set-ups are all peaches and sunshine. Payer mix is gonna be a uuuuuuge factor, and scheduling shenanigans are sure to be at play as well. Could be an awesome financial opportunity, or you could be kicking yourself - hard.

Tell us more.
 
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RU2003

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Dude, you really have to provide more details. Not all FFS PP set-ups are all peaches and sunshine. Payer mix is gonna be a uuuuuuge factor, and scheduling shenanigans are sure to be at play as well. Could be an awesome financial opportunity, or you could be kicking yourself - hard.

Tell us more.
Payer mix is very good, not much out of network, 43% Medicare, pretty fair for choosing rooms/cases, make as much as you want to work, take extra calls, group is mix of young and old, but good reputation, well liked by administration etc

Have to probably move and give up cardiac
 

sleepallday

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Payer mix is very good, not much out of network, 43% Medicare, pretty fair for choosing rooms/cases, make as much as you want to work, take extra calls, group is mix of young and old, but good reputation, well liked by administration etc

Have to probably move and give up cardiac
yikes.

Is 43% medicare considered good payor mix these days??
 
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Scotty_G

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43% medicare eh... That is almost 50% :/ I guess it's better than 43% medicaid! Out of network is different now. The days when you could bill everything out of network and get paid 300/unit are gone. Are you compensating by working more?
 
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nimbus

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Payer mix is very good, not much out of network, 43% Medicare, pretty fair for choosing rooms/cases, make as much as you want to work, take extra calls, group is mix of young and old, but good reputation, well liked by administration etc

Have to probably move and give up cardiac
43% Mcare is terrible. Are they subsidized?
 
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RU2003

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Yes important question to ask/know.
i have to ask about that part, i know they work hard but nothing bad at all especially for private practice and they do well. Other than medicare and payer mix, assuming they are good, is a fee for service model where you pay for your own health insurance and malpractice after partnership stable for future for long term to come assuming hospital administration loves group and seeks no change of course long term
 

SaltyDog

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is a fee for service model where you pay for your own health insurance and malpractice after partnership stable for future for long term to come
Being FFS has absolutely nothing to do with stability. The group could decide tomorrow they wanted to switch to a blended unit, or salary plus dividend, or whatever the hell reimbursement scheme they choose to pay themselves. In a true PP, whether you pay for expenses like malpractice/health/licensing or the group does just changes which line it goes in on the books. It's the same pot of money. If your concern is stability, then you need to know things like hospital subsidy, prevalence of AMC's in the area, relationships with hospital admin (no good way to know without some insider info), etc.
 
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