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Given this situation, will I be a good medical school applicant?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by twentyquestions, Aug 6, 2011.

  1. twentyquestions

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    I'm sorry, I tried posting this in the questions section, but for some reason it would not let me. I am new to the site, so I apologize in advance if I'm doing something wrong.

    I graduated this June of 2011 from UC Davis with a 3.3 GPA and my major was in Neurobio, Physiology, and Behavior (a kind of integrative bio major). I have taken the MCAT twice and got 29 both times. I have worked in the wet lab for a few summers, absolutely hated it, and even then I was only a lowly assistant with the research around me too advanced for me to even understand back then. I have practically no experience working with patients. A primary concern of mine is that at the moment, I am worried if medicine is even my passion, since I feel l lack the knowledge that comes from experience to make a good decision on whether I want to be a doctor. I hope I'm not committing premed blasphemy by saying that, I am only trying to be honest with myself. Right now, I am thinking about taking EMT classes this fall and working as an EMT-B for two years, while hopefully also volunteering at some clinics. My question is, by the time I apply in possibly 2013, will I be able to get in to medical school, assuming I do not retake the MCAT, or even if I do? Any help is tremendously appreciated!
     
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  3. JazzyJMD

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    With your GPA and MCAT I'd say you have a so-so chance of getting in. Med schools generally accept people with GPAs at 3.5 and greater and around 30 or greater MCATs, so you're hovering near the desired numbers, maybe a little bit low. I would think you would get interviews at least in your home state, and if you dazzle them who knows. I had a little bit higher GPA and same MCATs and didn't get in so I went to the caribbean. It's definitely worth checking out if you really want to be a doctor. I'm in residency in the US at a university program so it can be done.

    The most important thing is you have to be confident that's what you want to do. Obviously with little clinical experience it will be tough to know. As a resident I still am not sure the field I'm in will make me happy, but you have to make a leap of faith. It's a ton of work and your personal life will suffer. You have to ask yourself why you want to go into medicine, and if that reason will be enough to sustain you through long hours and hard work. The best thing I could say is try to find a doctor to shadow or volunteer in a hospital and see if it excites you being there. Good luck.
     
  4. Pietrantonio

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    If you don't apply, then the answer is always NO. If you do apply, you have a chance of getting into medical school - even if it's a NO decision when you apply, at least you know. BUT that doesn't mean it is the end. Use it to your advantage and ask the adcom your weaknesses in your application, and build from that.

    What has attracted you to EMT-B?
     
  5. twentyquestions

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    I was figuring it would be a good way to gain some experience actually performing some kind of treatment on people, instead of just doing paperwork or pipetting at a lab bench, which seem to be the only things available right now to fresh BS graduates. However, I'm hearing that the job market for EMT-Bs in California is not very good right now, so I'm a little lost as to what to do. I haven't been doing much since graduating in June and at the moment I am pretty worried and feeling lost.
     
  6. the duck

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    You'll need the clinical experience, so I'd definitely go the EMT route. Also, please don't rush into medicine if your not sure about it, you don't wanna spend the rest of your life doing something you don't like just because you were in a rush to done with school, and didn't take the time off to decide whether or not its truly your passion.

    The person above who advices you to just apply is a moron. First off, being a re-applicant hurts your chances, and secondly you don't want to rush into medical school. Becoming a CNA is another option that allows for real hands-on clinical experience with little training. I hear the job market is a lot better than it is for EMT. However the work is a lot less "sexy"

    PS. Go Aggies!
     
  7. Pietrantonio

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    Give it a shot. You might find that this is for you! It's relatively inexpensive and can be done in a short amount of time. You'll get a lot of hands on experience with patients of all situations. I have a lot of friends in the pre-hospital profession - both ground and air ambulance services. If you ever need anything just PM me.
     
  8. Pietrantonio

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    Where are you evidence based facts to back up this claim?
     
  9. Healer of Ills

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    I agree with this. The negative stigma associated with reapplying is only mere speculation. I have even heard others say that reapplying actually increases your chances due to the fact that it makes you appear to be more passionate and hungry to enter medicine.
     
  10. Pietrantonio

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    Before you call me a moron, maybe you can re-read the OP post in which the OP states: "Right now, I am thinking about taking EMT classes this fall and working as an EMT-B for two years, while hopefully also volunteering at some clinics. My question is, by the time I apply in possibly 2013, will I be able to get in to medical school, assuming I do not retake the MCAT, or even if I do? Any help is tremendously appreciated!"
     
  11. the duck

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    I have no evidence, merely what I have heard from several med students here in SDN. While I agree it might very well not put someone at a disadvantage, there is no doubt the application process is expensive, and for someone with borderline/ bellow average stats to begin with, it seems that applying with no clinical experience nor any other major EC (unless OP has something they aren't telling us) applying seems like a bit of a waste.

    however, my main reasoning why I believe the OP should wait, is that they expressed that they aren't sure about whether they are really passionate about medicine.


    They also clearly state that they aren't sure about medical school, and that they want to do the EMT to decide whether or not it is really the path they want to pursue.
     
  12. artsciencelove

    artsciencelove Class of 2016
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    Volunteer in a hospital. One of your duties will be transporting discharged patients, which gives you a chance to interact with them a little. I enjoy trying to brighten their day with a bit of humor or just being a friendly person who will listen to them. If you're a people person, you may make some friends with the hospital staff, which may translate to a paid position.
     
  13. Pietrantonio

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    Now remember, this is my advice. Do what you want with it.

    But, work on building both a

    1. Doctor - Patient relationship (shadowing, etc)

    2. Patient - Doctor relationship (Healthcare, taking care of the homeless at non-clincal facilities, etc)

    MY opinion is that if you are going to practice medicine (if you decide to go that route) do have a well rounded viewpoint of medicine and how it impacts your patients and how your patients impact medicine.

    If you have any questions, PM me. I will be glad to help answer any questions regarding EMS, etc.
     
  14. Propylene

    Propylene Class of 2017
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    Always nice to see a fellow Aggie (and an aspiring EMT at that)! The job market for EMT is tough but if you're diligent about applying it's definitely possible. If you're staying in davis you can work for Onsite medical, Davis fire, or AMR.

    Being an EMT is great but also try to get a chance to see doctors practicing medicine. Shadowing, volunteering, etc. I know there are several free clinics in sacramento that will take volunteers if you tell them you want to help out. Like other people have said your goal now is to look and see if medicine is for you, so spend some time in those environments.

    If you get good vibes from medical care, then go for it! I think that you could get in somewhere. With the time off you could even work on raising your MCAT. Good luck!
     
  15. TheMightySmiter

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    I volunteered as an EMT for two years and then used my certification to get a CNA job in a hospital. I can tell you right now that you'll get far better clinical experience as a CNA than as an EMT--at least, I did. It's also easier to find jobs as a CNA. So I'd recommend that route for clinical experience. Or, you can just volunteer at a free clinic doing patient intakes or something.

    For the rest of your application, you'll need to improve either your GPA or your MCAT to maximize your chances. I'd say MCAT unless your GPA has a downward trend. It doesn't look all that great to take the MXAT twice and not improve your score at all, but if you retake and your score goes up significantly, you'll be in a better position. It's also a lot cheaper than trying to improve your grades. Don't worry about the bench research, I tried it and hated it too. But I also did a summer of health policy research which I loved. See if you can't find a non-lab research position that you find interesting.
     

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