Zuckman

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Hey guys,
Can anyone enlighten me on how easy it is to come back to do a US residency after doing Meds in Australia? I know certain residencies are more difficult to get into than others but what about the less competitive ones such as FP? Is FP relatively easy to get into even if one does med in Aus? Thanks in advance.

Zuck
 

Dr.Millisevert

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Hey guys,
Can anyone enlighten me on how easy it is to come back to do a US residency after doing Meds in Australia? I know certain residencies are more difficult to get into than others but what about the less competitive ones such as FP? Is FP relatively easy to get into even if one does med in Aus? Thanks in advance.

Zuck

If you're interested in Family practice.. you could just stay here and train and still return later if you want since the programs here are recognised in the US.

Reciprocity agreements

(The GP programs in Australia are second to none).


Physicians who are fellows of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners may apply to sit for the American Board of Family Medicine Certification Examination if they:

are members in good standing of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners;
have completed the Royal Australian College of General Practice Training Program;
reside in the United States;
hold a valid and unrestricted license to practice medicine in the United States; and,
are actively involved in Family Medicine in the United States.

Goodluck
 

driedcaribou

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hold a valid and unrestricted license to practice medicine in the United States;

You may require the USMLE to be ECFMG certified for obtaining a valid and unrestricted license to practice medicine... though it might be possible to get contracts with specific hospitals or health networks. I do know of some situations where Canadian FPs have managed to go to the US without writing the USMLE and I imagine this process to be identical for Australians.


The US is a merit based system and has a large number of unfilled residencies every year. With a lot of hard work, good financial support, and the right motivation, you can match into some of the competitive residencies in the US from Australia. That being said, you have to be realistic with yourself. If you were not a strong student before, you will not likely change much while you are in Australia.

Skim the forum for the information you need and then ask specific questions as your develop them.

There is no need to stay in Australia for 4 years after you graduate to finish your GP training unless you want more clinical exposure and/or want to spend time down under. You will need to get permanent residency before you can even enter a training program. You would save yourself time and paperwork to just go back to the US and do your 3 years of family practice. You need to learn medicine under the US system so that you are able to navigate it on your own.
Residency is not just about medical knowledge - but even then - protocol differs from country to country.

I can't agree that the Australian GP training program is second to none as the scope of practice for GPs in Australia, Canada (FPs), and the US are slightly different and thus the training programs are as well. The training programs are also managed by different entities as well.

I would like to say that if one works hard and is in medicine for the 'right reasons', you will be able to learn what you need to for your patients.
One who needs hand-holding to learn medicine will make a poor doctor in the long term.
 
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Zuckman

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Thanks a lot guys...great informative posts. So it seems that if I wanted to do FP there would be very little problem in going to the states...even if I'm a Canadian. I really think that I would want to live in North America since my family would be much closer.

I'm not looking to compete for a very competitive residency but I'm not sure if FP is what I want either. All I really want to have as an Australian med grad (if I become one) would be somewhat of a choice towards specialties in case FP is not what I want. I've heard internal med is not that competitive as well.

But by no means would I try to compete for any type of surgery, radiology, or dermatology...even if I went to Canada/US for Med. It's simply too competitive for me...and I'm absolutely sure I can be very happy in many other medical fields.

Zuck
 

driedcaribou

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If your goal is to go to Canada, do not think about the US then.

You do realize that if you finish your specialty in Australia you can just go back to Canada as a specialist right?

It will just take a long time and you would be subject to employment availability.

Training availability in Canada is changing all the time... you could very easily land a FP spot... as for other specialties, you never know until you try.
 

Zuckman

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Ya, I've heard of a 10yr moratorium ...but I don't know much about it. I'll do some research on it. Where are you studying DriedCaribou? Do you like the medschool? I've interviewed at several Canadian schools but I've had no luck...I really only want to go to a Canadian med school for the practicality of it (financially easier)...but it's also a bit of a boring route as well...I see going to Oz as an adventure sort of...I'm excited just thinking about the prospect of going to Australia. Thanks for the help.

Zuck
 
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