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Going to US from UK

Mossmoon

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    I am sure this is on here a lot, but I can't find it, so please let me know if you have an answer or a link to a previous answer. Thank you!

    I am studying medicine in the UK but I have dual-citizenship to the USA. I really, really want to move back to the USA as soon as I possibly can. I know I will have to study a lot of other subjects in order to pass the USMLE, but apart from that, I don't know much.

    I am almost positive I want to be a neonatologist, so lets assume that is definitely what I will do. When should I take each step of the USMLE? Also, is it better to go to the US straight out of med school, or should I do F1 and F2 or more here? I am kind of afraid to ask a mentor as they don't know this is my plan! :scared:
     

    JediBookworm

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      Well, with US citizenship you wouldn't need a visa, that helps a bit with timing. You should probably go back right after you graduate... Wait for further advice.

      Just curious, why is it that you "really, really want to move back to the USA as soon as [you] possibly can"? Any non-personal reasons?
       

      Mossmoon

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        Honestly? I have been here for eight years. I first moved to London and then up to Edinburgh. I do like it here, but I just feel like it's time to go back. There are a lot of things that drive me crazy about living in Edinburgh, and I miss my family. It's very strange to move to a different country. It's complicated. I feel conflicted, like I have two homes and wish I could push them together so I could drive to see my family and then go home to my pretty city. Also, I don't think I have very much in common at all with the Scottish!
         
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        VeerTheTIGuy

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          i'm also from the US, studying in the UK, in a 6 year program; and i plan to go back to the US for specialization too.

          my plan is to take the USMLE step 1 after my 3rd year, which is the end of my preclinical studies. if you're in a 5 year program, either take it after your 2nd or 3rd year, depending on how many pre-clinical years you have (either 2 or 2.5). i've heard that having a bit of clinical practice under your belt may help for the USMLE step 1 for people coming from the UK, because the types of material that are stressed are a little bit different.

          also, don't be afraid of your mentor. just ask them, they can't kick you out of med school for planning your future! the worst that can happen is that they don't know anything that could help you:thumbup:
           

          Scottish Chap

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            Honestly? I have been here for eight years. I first moved to London and then up to Edinburgh. I do like it here, but I just feel like it's time to go back. There are a lot of things that drive me crazy about living in Edinburgh, and I miss my family. It's very strange to move to a different country. It's complicated. I feel conflicted, like I have two homes and wish I could push them together so I could drive to see my family and then go home to my pretty city. Also, I don't think I have very much in common at all with the Scottish!
            I'm from Edinburgh (U of E graduate, too, though not MBChB) but I'm a medical student in the U.S. now. It is hard living in a different culture, I know. You do not need clinical experience to do well on step 1. The major issue you will face is that a lot of the material on this test (especially the detailed biochemisty, pharmacology, and unusual pathogens that the U.S. has) are not taught by Edinburgh University's medical school.

            To score well, you will almost definitely need 2-3 months to prepare for step 1 compared to the 4-5 weeks that we get. I suggest getting hold of BRS physiology and BRS pathology and working your way through those problems as you take those courses at Edinburgh. They have USMLE-style questions that are quite representative. It will be especially useful given that pathophysiology and pathology are weighed most heavily on step 1. Definitely purchase the KAPLAN Q-bank and work through all of those questions. If you can pick up the Kaplan review books second-hand somewhere (Ebay etc.), even better. Try to take step 1 at the end of 3rd year in your MBChB curriculum. Unlike American medical students, you must also take step 2 and get your ECFMG certificate before applying for U.S. residencies.

            I would try to use elective time in 5th year to do at least one clinical rotation in the U.S. so that you can get at least one letter of recommendation that is stateside and try to get that elective coincident with the time when you must present for the step 2 clinical skills exam in the U.S. - this way you'll killl two birds with one stone. As for the written component of Step 2....I have friends who have taken it before and after the clinical exam of step 2 and either seems to work well as long as you have completed your clinical attachments in medicine, surgery, p(a)eds, general practice, and obs and gynae.

            The good news is that Edinburgh's med school is well-known and respected in the U.S. Even with an 'okay' showing on the USMLE's, there are not a lot of doors that will close on you - especially with your U.S. citizenship. I hope that helps - at least a wee bit.
             

            Mossmoon

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              Thank you to all of you, that was very helpful. The website is now a reference for me! I will definitely ask a mentor soon. Ha... (I am a little bit of a wimp.)

              Scottish Guy: May I ask how long it took from between the time you graduated here to getting a residency and moving there? I know it will be a little less complicated for me, but I am still worried about travelling for interviews, how many places I will need to apply, etc.
               
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