Aug 26, 2015
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Pre-Medical
Hi Again!

I have been reading a lot about the financial side of medicine and health careers, and it seems each one went through a "golden era" and then slowly died down and currently has market oversaturation.

For example, in the 80s, dentists could be making six figures right out of dental school, and could earn plenty more if they expanded. Now, dental grads are lucky to get part time work right out of school, and even after entry level dentistry, job prospects are no where near in the 80s.

In Pharmacy, it's just a joke. I was watching a video of a pharmacist who said he submitted 200 job applications and only got 2 interviews and no job offers.

Even nursing is starting to go under. You can't even drive along the highway without seeing "Get your RN in as little as 2 years!". I've had some nursing friends have difficulty finding work because hospitals prefer experienced nurses.

So...is medicine next? I understand that the AAMC has lots of lobbying power to control the number of residencies, but, what do you think?

How long will medicine be a guaranteed six-figure job?
 

Maruko

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Jul 14, 2007
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dentistry is still a very lucrative career.
pharmacy is saturated in the north, but in the south (eg, Florida), pharmacists are still making $120k right out of school.

i would still want to be a doctor even if income were capped at $100k.
for income to be acceptably capped, though, the tuition must be lowered significantly.
http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2014/05/pay-french-doctor.html

bobiest said:
Among all kinds of loans, student loans carry the highest or near highest interest rates - it is one of the few areas that the fed government actually makes money from. The policies towards students in the US are pretty hostile compared to other developed countries.

For example, the fed student loan in Canada is interest free, and the general tuition costs in colleges are ridiculously low compared to what US colleges charge. In Europe, most college educations are simply free for their own citizens.

Only in the US, students are under greatest pressure of debt that lasts the majority of their working life.
 
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May 4, 2015
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dentistry is still a very lucrative career.
pharmacy is saturated in the north, but in the south (eg, Florida), pharmacists are still making $120k right out of school.

i would still want to be a doctor even if income were capped at $100k.
for income to be acceptably capped, though, the tuition must be lowered significantly.
http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2014/05/pay-french-doctor.html
capped at 100k? I would be realistic and say that in those circumstances, work hours and training better become shorter for any person to dive into such extensive work and family sacrifice. Compare this with grad school and while they work long hours the people there have great flexibility. Family is always seen on a daily basis enough so that you can come home not tired. Anyways, I hardly think any economist or business person would hear about the concerns of whiney pre-meds.