Good post-bac program

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by genius322, Dec 5, 2002.

  1. I am a senior in a decent university. My major is Biology. I had no aspirations of going to medical school because i wanted to go into pharm industry, possibly sales. After careful considerations, insight from my parents, and a personal experience i decided to pursue my recent medical aspirations. I find my self at setback, my gpa is not so hot, 2.7, and was advised to either pursue either a post-bac program or a possible masters program. The hitch is that i have already completed the reqiurements since they are all requirements for a Biology. I find myself in need of assistance, whether to pursue a masters in anatomy or physio, or a post-bac program. For those students who are in post-bac programs can you please give me some insight on your program, location, stats for admissions, length, and acceptrance rate into medical shool after "successful" completion of the post-bac program
    thanks :confused:
     
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  3. coolwaters

    coolwaters Member

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    Genius322,

    One thing to consider is that the overall undergrad GPA matters, and you will not be able to raise yours if you are in a masters program. Taking post-bacc couses would allow you to raise your undergrad GPA to above a 3.0 if you work hard - this seems to be a bit of a magic number in the eyes of many - having a GPA below a 3.0 will make acceptance difficult. I would opt for the post-bac program.

    good luck to you.
     
  4. LoneCoyote

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    I would say go post-bac also to bring up the GPA. There have been several threads about the pros and cons of formal post-bac programs v. state schools recently. Try running a search for them. I think they would be pretty informative. I'm doing post-bac myself, at a state school, and I have several friends doing it at formal programs. Feel free to PM me if you want more info. :)
    Good luck.
     
  5. The Hulk

    The Hulk Official Green Monster

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    with a GPA that low, you may actually have trouble getting into a masters program and one of the more well-known formal post-bac programs (Harvard, columbia, Upenn, smith, goucher, Tufts, Uconn are the big ones). As a post-bac myself I would suggest looking at a less-structured programs, one connected to your local state school. The most important thing is that you retake your prereqs or do graduate-level health science coursework and get A's, as well as doing as best as you can on the MCAT (above 30). If you can get into a masters program I say do it. Good luck, and feel free to PM me if you have any questions.

    TH
     
  6. jms2002

    jms2002 Member

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    One think to keep in mind, you need a pstbac "enrichment" program. I think UCONN has a good one. Many postbac programs that arent "enrichment" wont let you in if you already took sciences. Check out the aamc.org website - there is a section on postbacs
     
  7. conure

    conure Master Distiller

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    harvard post bac is not competetive. Anyone who wants to do it can. If your GPA is below 3.0 you must complete 32 credits above 3.0 and get 30 on the MCAT thats all for the requirements.
     
  8. The Hulk

    The Hulk Official Green Monster

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    Well, I can't completely agree with you there. You can sign up to take the same courses that the HCP people do, but in order to be considered in the program and get a comp letter from Dr. Fixsen you have to be admitted; beyond your GPA there is an essay and I remember a LOR as well. Also, while I would agree that it is more difficult to get into a program like Bryn Mawr or Tufts, it is more difficult to stay in Harvard's program. You need to keep a 3.0 minimum GPA in all classes you take, and the over-all attrition rate winds up being almost 50% because of this.

    TH
     
  9. gringotuno

    gringotuno Member

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    Really, I didn't think that an attrition rate of 50% of the Harvard Extension Post-bac was that high. Even if it is that high, I suggest that it is due to other reasons rather than the fact that the program is really that challenging. Having had a full-time job, a part time job and taking Harvard Extension School classes as part of the Health Careers Progarm, the real challenges of the post-bad are usually the other things happening in your life while you are participating. Everyone I knew taking classes there had a job... and 90% had full time jobs. You are essentially taking night classes. I do believe that the program is wonderful and helped me out plenty. The program was supremely wonderful in the sense that I actually COULD work durring that year... and that was the most important factor that directed me to Harvard. Unless you have a sugar daddy that can fork out 30K or more for tuition and living expenses to take a year off to slightly improve your overall GPA, Harvard is the answer.

    Conclusion: Harvard Health Careers Program = Da Bomb

    P.S. Enrolling in the extension school is not competitive... but being part of the Health Careers Program is. And, this is such a wonderful thing... i.e. you have random people taking the science classes with you. I like that type of competition.
     
  10. conure

    conure Master Distiller

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    I just finished the program in May and I did not submit any LORs but I did write and essay. The essay was pertty much a weak personal statement and most likely had little barring o acceptance. Really if you provide a check they are happy to cash it and have you in the program. This may have changed, but bottom line is I felt no competition other then with myself to be sponsored by the HCP.

    There are cut offs for a composite letter, one of which I already mentioned. If you have a higher undergrad GPA then the cut offs are reduced.

    The attrition rate is not only due to the difficulty of the classes and what Gringo wrote is correct. Also a lot of people simply use their undergrad inst. for a letter (which is an option for the OP), and a ton drop out because they aren't happy with it. That maybe grade related but its not because of the difficulty of the classes. If I learned one thing in the program its that you and you alone are responsible for your performance.
     
  11. jalfredprufrock

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    Speaking from my own experience, a place like Harvard Extension sounds like it will be the best for you. It's very affordable and flexible. Unfortunately, Tufts is not an option, as they do not accept people looking to improve their grades in prerequisite courses that they've already taken. There's also Metropolitan College at BU. Otherwise, outside of boston, Johns Hopkins, Goucher, Columbia, and Hunter College all have good programs. Columbia is a bit pricey, I think.
     

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