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Good price for Netter's book?

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by edgar, Apr 16, 1999.

  1. edgar

    edgar Senior Member
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    To all you medical students:

    I was on the amazon.com website and I saw a hardbook edition of Atlas of Human Anatomy by Frank Netter/Sharon Colacino for $89.95. Is this a good book, and is this a good price? I'm also interested in buying a paperback edition of Gray's anatomy for $14.99. I'd like to know if you guys know of another website that has possibly even better prices.

    Thanks,

    EDGAR
     
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  3. jdaasbo

    jdaasbo Senior Member
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    You will definately need Netter, there is no doubt. At the price you quoted, that had better be a hard cover edition. Get the hard-cover, the soft falls apart quickly (no you don't take your copy of Netter into lab, though).

    Forget the paper back edition of Grays for 14.95. There are many many "Gray's" books. Some recommended ones are: Clemente, Gray's Anatomy, 31st American edition., 1985; Williams et al., Gray's Anatomy, 38th British edition., 1995 (expect to pay close to or over $200 for this one, but it is very nice).

    Other good books are: Rohen, Yokochi and Lutjen-Drecoll, Color Atlas of Human Anatomy, 4th ed., 1998 (nice photographic atlas, could not live without it before the practicals); McMinn et al., Color Atlas of Human Anatomy, 3rd ed., 1991; Agur, Grant's Atlas of Anatomy, 9th ed., 1991; Moore, Clinically Oriented Anatomy, 3rd ed., 1992 ( has many of the figures from the afforementioned Agur book, and I liked this one a lot); Clemente, Anatomy, A Regional Atlas of the Human Body, 4th ed., 1997.


    That's a start. Usually Amazon has fair prices. Go to a medical bookstore to check these out. Actually, apart from buying a Netter to ease your itch, I would wait untill school starts.

    Johan Aasbo
    MS-1 CCOM
     
  4. mevannorden

    mevannorden Member
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    Advice to all incoming medical students: Don't buy any text books until you talk to other students and go to class. I would guess that I've bought less than half the required texts, simply because the professors' notes are sufficient. Books I have used are Netter's (it never hurts to buy Netter's, although don't start studying too soon. You might regret it.), Mosby's Physical Diagnosis, a Histology text book, a neuroanatomy and a neuroscience book, and that's about all. If I need an additional source I buy the board review book. I've found them helpful. Of course which books you'll need depend on your school and the quality of the instructors. For me, neuroanatomy was taught VERY poorly at UOMHS, so I had to read through the assigned chapters over, and over, and over again before I truly understood what I was reading.

    [This message has been edited by mevannorden (edited April 17, 1999).]
     
  5. OldManDave

    OldManDave Fossil Bouncer Emeritus
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    What neuroscience and neuroanatomy texts were required/recommended? I have many NS [the Bible-->Kandel & Scwartz] and NS anatomy [Netter's and Martin's] books from Ugrad world. I'm not weird, just grad with a BS in NS is all...


    [​IMG]



    ------------------
    'Old Man Dave'
    KCOM, Class of '03
     
  6. HeatherR

    HeatherR Member
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    Kandel's principles (not the essentials book) and a good atlas is probably all you need. I used Haines Neuroanatomy atlas and liked it, but netter is probably just as good. If you've done a NS major you probably already know all the neuroanatomy and neurophys that you'll ever need, and you'll just have to learn the clinical neurology to put it all together. You'll be able to snooze right through neuro class - lucky you!
     
  7. mevannorden

    mevannorden Member
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    For neuroanatomy we used Young and Young, which is authored by a father/son (neurosurgeon/neuroscientist, I think)team. It was a pretty good book, although certain sections weren't totally lucid. For Neurophys. I used Kingsley. It was an ok book. I used Netter for the atlas, although Young and Young has a partial atlas in it.
     
  8. Diane E

    Diane E Member
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    Edgar-
    $90.00 is the going rate for the text. You may consider paying $145 and
    getting the CD plus paperback. I've found the CD helps test my knowledge.
    [​IMG] Diane

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  9. JamesonStokes

    JamesonStokes Junior Member

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    If possible find a used Netter. I wouldnt waste my time on any CD versions (will you have time?). Clemente is a thicker atlas with more defined pictures (in my opinion) but is not as distinctly oulined as Netter. But clarity has its advantages when trying to determine the route of different arteries over body structures. Netter is still an excellent choice which I've found at several medical schools in the USED book sections...
     

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