Got my MCAT! Puzzle is complete. Now chance me!

virtuoso735

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    I've posted a few chances threads in the past, but now all the pieces have fallen into place and any advice right now would be of most use to me.

    Stats:
    cGPA: 3.42, sGPA: ~3.35
    MCAT: 10 PS, 11 VR, 10 BS; 31S composite

    Background:
    -Low-income and first-generation (neither parent graduated from high school). Family immigrated to US when I was a young child
    -Went to ivy-league school and majored in bio
    -Did not know that I wanted to pursue a career in medicine until senior year, so EC's are a bit lacking

    The last year has been a gap year of sorts so that I could study for the MCAT and put a lot of time into volunteering.

    Extracurriculars:
    -Worked on three different research projects during undergrad (mostly in evo bio); one of them was a summer full-time position, one was a side project, and one was my senior project
    -Tutoring disadvantaged kids and helping with their homework (ongoing)
    -Emergency Department volunteer 6 hours a week (ongoing)
    -Visit hospice patients 4 hours a week (ongoing)
    -Play the piano for hospice patients at nursing homes weekly (ongoing)
    -Worked at several different jobs during undergrad to help with financial aid

    *all the "ongoing" activities I have been doing since last summer/fall

    Am shadowing a DO right now; should have 40 hours by June and should have letter as well.

    My strategy is to apply widely to DO schools, and apply to 14 of the "least selective" MD schools based on GPA/MCAT. Do I have any chance at MD schools? And are my stats competitive enough for the "best" DO schools like DMU and KCUMB?
     
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    Keepitclassy

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      Frky pretty much summed it up for you, you should have no problem landing several prestigious DO acceptances. If you apply broadly enough, you should be able to land some allopathic school interviews depending on the depth of your EC's and strength of your LOR's/PS.

      Make sure you apply ASAP too, the longer you wait, the lower your chances (for allopathic)
       

      virtuoso735

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        As long as it is done before you matriculate, you are solid. Kcumb also requires genetics. Fyi.

        Genetics was required for my major, so that one I have down. :) Wish I had taken biochem though. Will probably end up taking at a community college if I can find one that offers biochem.

        Any more input for my chances?
         
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        virtuoso735

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          virtuoso735

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            If you have any application advice for those in similar shoes, or insights gained based on feedback received during interviews that "made a difference", we'd love to hear it.

            Sure do. I've made sure to do interview feedback reports for each school I've interviewed at so far.

            Also, this may be common knowledge, but I really do think that schools look beyond GPA and MCAT once you get to a certain point. The schools I've interviewed seemed to place a huge emphasis on fit. If you can somehow tailor your background and experiences to fit their philosophy, you are that much closer to an acceptance. My grades and MCAT were really borderline, so I think my interview was very important in sealing the deal.

            Personally, I started late on the premed route (end of senior year) but I dove head first into it for an entire year. I couldn't find a job, so all I did was volunteer (both community and clinical) and study for the MCAT. I had lots of moments of doubt thinking that it would never work out since I only had one year of clinical activities, but schools are looking for what you learned throughout the process. Before writing your AMCAS and going into interviews, make sure to really reflect on your experiences. Write down things you learned, experiences that moved you. Talk to your friends and family about your experiences, and make sure you know what you want to say about them. Only then can you write and speak convincingly.

            If you have something unique in your background, make sure you write about in your application and talk about it in your interview. I come from a low-income background, and I'm a first-generation college student. My family was on Medicaid and welfare throughout my childhood. My interviewers were impressed that I did well enough to get into an ivy league school. I had to work throughout college to contribute to my financial aid. I made sure these points were clear. I connected my background to my desire to want to work with underserved communities. I worked my activities into my future goals. I feel like there was an overarching theme in my application, something that tied it together. Find something that stands out about you and make it clear that it'll help you be a compassionate physician.

            Anyways, I've started rambling, but I'm just really grateful for the opportunity to become a physician. I'd never thought I'd make it this far, but I realize it's only the beginning of a long journey. :)
             
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            Goro

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              You're fine for any DO school, and I think for MD schools your best chances will be at the low-tier ones like Rosy Franklin or NYMC, but you may have some luck with your state schools.

              My strategy is to apply widely to DO schools, and apply to 14 of the "least selective" MD schools based on GPA/MCAT. Do I have any chance at MD schools? And are my stats competitive enough for the "best" DO schools like DMU and KCUMB?
               

              Docility

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                Sure do. I've made sure to do interview feedback reports for each school I've interviewed at so far.

                Also, this may be common knowledge, but I really do think that schools look beyond GPA and MCAT once you get to a certain point. The schools I've interviewed seemed to place a huge emphasis on fit. If you can somehow tailor your background and experiences to fit their philosophy, you are that much closer to an acceptance. My grades and MCAT were really borderline, so I think my interview was very important in sealing the deal.

                Personally, I started late on the premed route (end of senior year) but I dove head first into it for an entire year. I couldn't find a job, so all I did was volunteer (both community and clinical) and study for the MCAT. I had lots of moments of doubt thinking that it would never work out since I only had one year of clinical activities, but schools are looking for what you learned throughout the process. Before writing your AMCAS and going into interviews, make sure to really reflect on your experiences. Write down things you learned, experiences that moved you. Talk to your friends and family about your experiences, and make sure you know what you want to say about them. Only then can you write and speak convincingly.

                If you have something unique in your background, make sure you write about in your application and talk about it in your interview. I come from a low-income background, and I'm a first-generation college student. My family was on Medicaid and welfare throughout my childhood. My interviewers were impressed that I did well enough to get into an ivy league school. I had to work throughout college to contribute to my financial aid. I made sure these points were clear. I connected my background to my desire to want to work with underserved communities. I worked my activities into my future goals. I feel like there was an overarching theme in my application, something that tied it together. Find something that stands out about you and make it clear that it'll help you be a compassionate physician.

                Anyways, I've started rambling, but I'm just really grateful for the opportunity to become a physician. I'd never thought I'd make it this far, but I realize it's only the beginning of a long journey. :)

                Congrats and thanks for the advice! :thumbup: Best of luck on your journey to becoming a physician. :)

                Just out of curiosity, are you an URM?
                 
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