joetro

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 29, 2005
353
3
Status
This question is directed more at people who are currently in clinical programs. I am wondering if some particular labs/schools/professors have inside people already picked out for particular openings? Has anyone run into this during the process of applying, getting an interview but being denied admission, etc. - that you were going up against someone who was already working in that lab? How common a practice is this?

Thanks!
 

BrainBall

New Member
10+ Year Member
Oct 9, 2005
5
0
Status
Other Health Professions Student
joetro said:
This question is directed more at people who are currently in clinical programs. I am wondering if some particular labs/schools/professors have inside people already picked out for particular openings? Has anyone run into this during the process of applying, getting an interview but being denied admission, etc. - that you were going up against someone who was already working in that lab? How common a practice is this?

Thanks!
I don't know how common it is overall- but personally I've seen it happen once in a while. Why wouldn't professors want to admit people already working in their lab to the program? Especially if those people are hard working, intelligent, and competent.
You brought up a good point in this post. If you want to get into a specific program or work with a specific researcher - try to volunteer in that lab - if you can't do this - at least contact the professor and show an interest in his/her research. Also, state in your personal essay that you'd like to work in that person's lab. Instead of competing with those in the lab - become that one in the lab.
Good luck!
 

twiggers

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Aug 5, 2004
353
0
Status
I saw this in one place I applied to....but since the person had been there for 2-3 years they really were only applying there as a backup and didn't take the position. In addition, some people actually prefer getting new people into the lab, since they feel that students need some diversity (to be stuck in one place for 8-9 years is a long time).
 
About the Ads

psy86

Member
10+ Year Member
Nov 15, 2005
153
0
Status
This is very common in my graduate program. Seems that about 1/2 of the people who are admitted worked as undergraduate or post-grad RA's in their advisor's lab prior to being admitted to the graduate program. Personally, I'm not a huge fan of this system since I think it detracts from intellectual and academic (and other forms of) diversity.
 

psych101

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 12, 2005
93
1
Status
Yes, I've known of this happening in several grad programs, including my own. Happens with internship placement as well.
 

joetro

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 29, 2005
353
3
Status
Thanks for the comments so far. It all seems quite frustrating to me ... I have always heard that it is better to go somewhere else other than where you did undergrad for graduate school, yet you can't get there if there are lots of internal hires. I really want to get in straight from undergraduate and not have to work in a lab just to have the pleasure of working in that lab for even longer when finally enrolled in graduate school.
 

JatPenn

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jan 27, 2005
223
1
Status
joetro said:
Thanks for the comments so far. It all seems quite frustrating to me ... I have always heard that it is better to go somewhere else other than where you did undergrad for graduate school, yet you can't get there if there are lots of internal hires. I really want to get in straight from undergraduate and not have to work in a lab just to have the pleasure of working in that lab for even longer when finally enrolled in graduate school.
nothing wrong with taking time to work in a lab after graduation.

don't think of grad school a the same as med school or law school, where you simply want to "finish" so that you can "start your career." clinical psych grad school IS the start of your career. think about it, you'll be doing research, writing papers, attending conferences, have scholarly discussion with faculty, making conncetions...folks, THIS IS YOUR CAREER! people are in such a rush to go to grad school right after graduation because they want to "get it done." you need to get yourself out of that mindset. make sure you REALLY are interested in whatever research your would-be lab is doing, or else you are doing yourself a massive disservice.

sorry about the rant, I'm just perplexed that people in general are turned off by the idea of working in research after graduation to garner invaluable experience for grad school.
 

joetro

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 29, 2005
353
3
Status
I just feel like I have significant experiences and would be ready to go straight through. I hope I wil be able to, but I agree with you that working in a lab can be a great experience. I didn't mean to disparage this, just express frustration at this seeming to be the norm.
 

lazure

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Jan 15, 2004
334
1
Canada
Visit site
Status
joetro said:
Thanks for the comments so far. It all seems quite frustrating to me ... I have always heard that it is better to go somewhere else other than where you did undergrad for graduate school, yet you can't get there if there are lots of internal hires. I really want to get in straight from undergraduate and not have to work in a lab just to have the pleasure of working in that lab for even longer when finally enrolled in graduate school.
Insider hiring is frequent - probably up to half of the graduate class members get in that way. Yet, profs are interested in fresh blood. At this point, instead of worrying so much about politics and so forth, work on your own application - good luck :)
 
About the Ads