Quantcast

Happy puppy syndrome

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

Stinger86

Intern year? Ha!
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2003
Messages
828
Reaction score
4
That would be the Happy Puppet Syndrome which is synonymous with Angelman's. Prader-Willi is a different syndrome.
 

LovelyRita

Blade Slinger
15+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2002
Messages
3,617
Reaction score
10
lol...I just saw it in a review book as "Happy PupPET syndrome", which IS Angelman. Aka "cocktail party demeanor".

I think puppies might might have more liveliness than puppets, IMHO. :)
 

Hercules

Son of Zeus
Joined
Jul 26, 2000
Messages
1,354
Reaction score
396
Just as a side-note:

If you're ever dealing with the family of a child with Angelman's, don't use the term Happy Puppet Syndrome. Most of them prefer the former and consider the latter derogatory.
 

Cristagali

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2003
Messages
219
Reaction score
2
Thanks for the post. Just curious, why not HPS associated with Prader-Willis, since the only difference is paternal inheritance? Angelman is maternal, but I thought they were basically the same. Thanks
 

Harrie

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2003
Messages
247
Reaction score
2
Angelman and Prader-Willi are not the same. Yes, they are associated with the same gene on the same chromosome. But, remember this is the big example of genetic imprinting. The presentation depends on which copy is deleted (paternal or maternal).
 

Stinger86

Intern year? Ha!
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2003
Messages
828
Reaction score
4
Originally posted by Hercules
Just as a side-note:

If you're ever dealing with the family of a child with Angelman's, don't use the term Happy Puppet Syndrome. Most of them prefer the former and consider the latter derogatory.


Your post makes me think of a similar situation. I always thought it was amusing that an old synonym for Tay-Sachs is Amaurotic Familial Idiocy. Heh, that's just rude. :D
 

Yosh

Livin' in the WINDY CITY
10+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 25, 1999
Messages
1,395
Reaction score
0
I had just read about this...

Prader Willi comes from the father...
Angelman's/Happy Puppet is the mother...

I used to work with Prader Willi......angelman's is something that just weirds me out....
 

BPKurtz

Heck Of A Guy
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2001
Messages
101
Reaction score
0
I love some of the obsolete medical words, like "consumption" instead of TB, and "French Polio" instead of Guillain-Barre. I think if stroke weren't so common it would be an obsolete term too, replaced by CVA ... I mean, there's no stroking of any kind going on there. Before I started medical school, I thought gout was obsolete too. Far from it! Well, I guess I really didn't know what it was except fat people in 19th century novels always seemed to get it and they couldn't walk. And the cure for every disease in 19th century novels was traveling to the seaside.

Then there are those persistent vernacular terms. Like when the patient tells you, "Doc, I got da sugah real bad."

bpkurtz
 

LovelyRita

Blade Slinger
15+ Year Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2002
Messages
3,617
Reaction score
10
Originally posted by BPKurtz
I mean, there's no stroking of any kind going on there.


Originally posted by BPKurtz
Then there are those persistent vernacular terms. Like when the patient tells you, "Doc, I got da sugah real bad."
bpkurtz

:laugh:

The term "sugar" for diabetes makes me so mad, b/c I really think it downplays the seriousness of the disease. In some circles, I think it's accepted as normal to grow old, get pudgy and get "sugar" or "a little sugar". Maybe if they called it stumpy syndrome, as in the amputations that can ensue, people would take it more seriously.

I like your post.:laugh:
 

the END.

Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2003
Messages
33
Reaction score
0
Just my 2 cents, it is "Happy Puppet" syndrome because those affected have jerky movements, seizures, tend to not talk, and are prone to fits of laughter no matter the situation (cocktail party demeanor). Anyway, these tendencies made those affected appear like their limbs had strings tied to them forcing their movements (marionettes). Thus, they were puppet children or happy puppet syndrome. Angelman himself called it this until the early 1980's when others decided it might be offensive and changed it to Angelman. Angelman's case report from 1965 is titled puppet children.

One last thing:
Originally posted by BPKurtz
I think if stroke weren't so common it would be an obsolete term too, replaced by CVA ... I mean, there's no stroking of any kind going on there.

The neurologists at my home institution feel that Cerbrovascular Accident is an improper term compared to stroke because "it wasn't an accident," and accidents might imply someone was at fault (like car accidents), which is not the case.
 

BPKurtz

Heck Of A Guy
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2001
Messages
101
Reaction score
0
Originally posted by the END.
Just my 2 cents, it is "Happy Puppet" syndrome because those affected have jerky movements, seizures, tend to not talk, and are prone to fits of laughter no matter the situation (cocktail party demeanor). Anyway, these tendencies made those affected appear like their limbs had strings tied to them forcing their movements (marionettes). Thus, they were puppet children or happy puppet syndrome. Angelman himself called it this until the early 1980's when others decided it might be offensive and changed it to Angelman. Angelman's case report from 1965 is titled puppet children.

One last thing:


The neurologists at my home institution feel that Cerbrovascular Accident is an improper term compared to stroke because "it wasn't an accident," and accidents might imply someone was at fault (like car accidents), which is not the case.

Interesting. Are the fits of laughter in Angelman's gelastic seizures or just fits of inappropriate laughter? Probably just the latter, since gelastic seizures are so rare.

I guess that's a good point about the term CVA. But there must be a better term for stroke -- haven't there been studies which showed that some huge proportion of the population can't identify any signs of stroke? Maybe a name which better conveys that the brain is losing its blood supply would help with detection. I don't have a specific name suggestion though.

bpkurtz
 
Top