Dismiss Notice
Check out the new Application Assistant, where you can calculate your LizzyM score, see how you rank compared to other applicants, and see a list of schools where similar students were accepted.

Has anyone been fired from a Scribe Position Immediately After Training?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical Allopathic [ MD ]' started by sg808, 09.22.14.

  1. SDN is made possible through sponsorships and our volunteers. Learn about SDN's nonprofit mission.
  1. sg808

    sg808 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    04.04.14
    Messages:
    173
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    This may not be the right place to post this thread, and if so I apologize in advance.

    I was wondering if anyone who applied for a scribe position in the past got fired immediately after training and if so why and what did you do afterwards, such as apply to another company etc? Does anyone know if this would look bad when applying to medical school.

    I got fired after the last day of training b/c of the poor training I received by my trainers, their lack of professionalism, and their inability to teach. They complained to the chief scribe that I wasn't improving and then my chief scribe sent me a email firing me. There's no second chance or anything.
     
    Sardinia likes this.
  2. SDN Members don't see this ad. About the ads.
  3. Fedekz

    Fedekz 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.25.08
    Messages:
    668
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    hSDN
    Alumni
    Simply don't put it on your resume. Think of it as a dream (nightmare) that never happened ...
     
  4. tiedyeddog

    tiedyeddog 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    03.17.08
    Messages:
    7,927
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Verified
    Physician
    Yeah leave it off the resume, pretend like it never occurred.
     
    sg808 and Planes2Doc like this.
  5. MeatTornado

    MeatTornado 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    12.01.08
    Messages:
    3,614
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    Verified
    Physician
    I'm loving the unhealthy mix of narcissism and entitlement you've got there. How about instead of automatically blaming others you try to think about what YOU did wrong and how you can improve on it.
     
  6. theseeker4

    theseeker4 PGY 1 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    04.20.11
    Messages:
    3,426
    Location:
    Suburban Detroit, MI
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Verified
    Physician
    Interesting that a scribe company that presumably has successfully trained multiple scribes before, is at fault for you being fired..... Sounds like the real reason is you either had a run in with someone above you that you handled poorly, or you were simply incompetent and were not improving. The fact that you are blaming them instead of showing even a shred of introspection is more harmful to your chances than getting fired in the first place.
     
  7. ndafife

    ndafife 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    06.16.14
    Messages:
    728
    Status:
    Medical Student
    As everyone mentioned, just don't put it on a resume... But the bigger issue is your attitude. I don't think many people get to far in life or medicine by blaming people.
     
  8. IamLeTired

    IamLeTired 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    11.30.11
    Messages:
    32
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    Where I work, only 1/2-3/4 of the scribes that get trained actually become scribes. It's a tough job with a steep learning curve, and there's a lot more to it than just memorizing terms. I wouldn't take it personally. Food for thought though: a big reason people don't make it through is their attitude and personality. I'm with seeker4 on this one, that attitude may have been why you got canned.
     
    Strudel19, Promethean and Goro like this.
  9. Planes2Doc

    Planes2Doc 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.23.12
    Messages:
    2,153
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    Status:
    Medical Student
    As others have said, if it's not on your resume, then it doesn't exist. The application doesn't ask you to list your full employment history, so you should leave it off. Make sure there are no traces of it online, such as Facebook, Linkedin, Google, etc...

    You should also reflect on why you lost this job. Learn from it, and make sure it doesn't happen again in the future. It could have been worse...
     
  10. zzxxzz

    zzxxzz 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    01.13.12
    Messages:
    639
    To people wondering, scribes get fired during/immediately after training all the time. It's nearly always due to incompetence. If you cannot properly document on your first shift, you're done.

    Scribe training is on you. It's not supposed to be an easy job, and there is high turnover. But you need to think about why you got fired. It's probably not the trainer's fault...
     
    mcatjelly, Promethean and Goro like this.
  11. tymont12

    tymont12 But it can't be two illnesses! 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    06.28.11
    Messages:
    295
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I'm the Operations Manager for a scribe company and while we attempt to only train people we think will 'work out,' that is not always the case. I feel bad for most scribes because it is a demanding job with dirt pay, but most people treat it as a stepping stone to their future career and therefore work their butt off to do well. It's a launching point, not an end point. I do agree with the OP however, that the quality of training can be highly variable but the individual trainee can be highly variable too. Scribe training is not uniform or standardized like becoming a phlebotomist or MA.

    My $0.02 to all potential scribes is to treat your opportunity to scribe as 'do or die,' where you really need to prove yourself. At least at my company, that means you will be in a good position to be offered a traveling trainer and/or higher paying position.

    I personally think this is a result of bad staffing and company recruiting, not the job itself. We do not have a high turnover rate and I believe it is because we invest a lot of time into our people.
     
    wholeheartedly likes this.
  12. zzxxzz

    zzxxzz 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    01.13.12
    Messages:
    639
    For the company/hospital network at which I work, the turnover rate is mostly due to shift inflexibility (someone quit because the chief scribe wouldn't let them take a day off for a med school interview) and the working conditions (usually no lunch/any breaks, clinic sometimes goes 3-4+ hrs over and there's no overtime pay). Also, the job can be very do-or-die, as you say. For most jobs, you might expect to have a rough first day/first few days. At my company, a "rough first day" can get your fired; one of the scribes in the class before me had this exact thing happen to her. It's not an ideal working environment. Some of the chief scribes (one for each dept) can be very difficult to work with, as they're mostly failed premeds in charge of probably-successful ones. I know the rewards for success are nice - my company will sometimes offer a 200% pay raise after 1 year if you'll commit to another year, which almost no one does - but many people don't make it that long. We basically get 8 hours of classroom training + 12 hours of floor training and then are thrown to the wolves, working with impatient physicians who expect immediate perfection. The company is trying to improve things - several of the most malcontent chief scribes were let go recently and they're increasing the amount of training - but overall, it's basically paid shadowing, and there will be premeds lining up for that forever.

    This kinda stuff is definitely present in other entry-level clinical jobs I've worked, though. As a CNA, we were paid zero for overtime (only get paid for 8 hours even if you have to stay an extra 90+ min, etc), often got no lunch break, and couldn't take a single day off under any circumstances (not even if you could get it covered) until we had 1 year of experience. On the other hand, if you fail your CNA exam, you can retake it, and CNAs have significantly more responsibilities than scribes...
     
    Planes2Doc likes this.
  13. tymont12

    tymont12 But it can't be two illnesses! 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    06.28.11
    Messages:
    295
    Status:
    Medical Student
    My god, it is hearing this sort of stuff that makes me foam at the mouth. It is amazing how poor (I.E., illegal) some employers threat their employees and get away with it.

    As a staffing company, random shift coverage is the most tedious and difficult thing to do. However, that's what staffing companies are supposed to do. Most scribe companies exist to simply siphon as much money as possible from their services. the EMR tutoring gigs companies offer are even worse.
     
    Promethean likes this.
  14. sg808

    sg808 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    04.04.14
    Messages:
    173
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    To all the posters above who responded thanks!

    To those of you who are blaming me about my attitude being the problem, my attitude did not have anything to due with it.

    Before I became a scribe, I was a supervisor at my old job and I trained people and saw other people train. You can tell who is a good trainer from the start and who sucks. If trainers cannot probably communicate, offer sufficient feedback, give you an opportunity to practice, or is on Google chat/texting the entire shift while training you....then I'm sorry I don't think these individuals should be trainers.

    I am not solely blaming the company or trainers that I worked with. I will admit I did make a few mistakes. But at the same time, I don't believe that I should be receiving the feedback regarding my mistakes in the firing email, without being offered the chance to improve.

    I learned the hard way that working for a scribe company is cut throat and appreciate the experience I had.
     
    Sardinia likes this.
  15. zzxxzz

    zzxxzz 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    01.13.12
    Messages:
    639
    Yep, when I told people about the overtime thing in particular they told me to report it to the govt...and also, it breeds ill will among the employees and can potentially negatively impact their performance. There were other horrible things - you had to ask for sick days 48 hours in advance (that makes sense...) and if you were more than 30 minutes late you were fired and potentially blacklisted. If you didn't know, being blacklisted means you'll never work as a CNA in that state for any institution again. Car broke down and the head nurse was having a bad day? Say goodbye to your career.

    I realize the difficulty in scheduling, and how important it is to have a full shift, but still, scheduling has been a major aggravator for all my clinical work. As a CNA, senior CNAs could bump junior CNAs off the schedule whenever the wanted some extra cash. This generally happened the day of the shift; you'd come in and get sent home 20 minutes later because someone showed up and took your shift. I wanted to go out of town with my family over christmas week, but couldn't because I was scheduled to work christmas eve/day and another day. I got bumped from all 3 days. I didn't work for a week and my family had already left without me. I sat at home alone over the holidays, livid. It's just little things like that that really decrease morale.


    EDIT: despite all my complaints, I loved the job and am extremely thankful for the opportunity. I learned a TON.
     
  16. ThisCouldBeYou

    ThisCouldBeYou

    Joined:
    10.27.13
    Messages:
    528
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    It's amazing to hear about yet another entry level job that is low pay and high stress. I don't want to judge the OP because I don't know him/her but these stories makes this economy just sucky. New graduates are happy to get any kind of job, but the opportunity to learn and grow is just not there. A friend of mine got a tutoring job and he was fired after working with this kid after three days because the kid got a B for making silly mistakes and the parents are holding the tutor responsible.
     
  17. IslandStyle808

    IslandStyle808 Akuma residency or bust! 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    08.05.12
    Messages:
    4,348
    I am guessing you are from the same state I am from considering the 808. Which hospital was this? I myself was considering being a scribe and so is a friend of mine. You can PM me if you feel comfortable saying this.

    Sorry to hear about the experience.
     
  18. Planes2Doc

    Planes2Doc 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.23.12
    Messages:
    2,153
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Based on what @zzxxzz and others have said, it comes to show that clinical jobs sometimes aren't all they are claimed to be... The horrors of scribing in this thread are a far cry from the clinical volunteering environment many on this site experience. When you volunteer, you can sit on your butt and study, and have no problem getting away with it because the staff won't care.

    So if your goal is to get into medical school, then what would you rather do? Scribe and have to deal with all of this aforementioned crap which can negatively impact your grades because of the schedule inflexibility and huge time commitment... OR... Volunteer in a hospital once a week where you can probably do whatever you want. Both will get you into medical school, so, the choice is yours.
     
    IslandStyle808 likes this.
  19. TXhopeful

    TXhopeful 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    10.10.13
    Messages:
    400
    Location:
    Texas
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I've trained 15+ scribes in my 3.5 years as an ER scribe.
    Scribing isn't for everyone. Training scribes isn't for everyone, or the most fun thing either. The ER is an awful place to try and train someone, keeping track of every word of your doctor's yelling in a trauma room, let alone keeping a legal document legible, coherent and professional. Our hospital did not offer extra training pay to give us any other incentive besides the goodness of our hearts to train new scribes. Some might call it a burden. Those might be some excuses to offer for your poor training, as you say it was.
    In my experience, training was not a confirmation of any sorts that your position was sealed. We considered it more of a "getting used to" period for the trainees, and so many of them gracefully walked away after a few shifts, shook my hand, smiled and admitted it wasn't what was expected.
    I wouldn't recommend putting it on a resume/application, but instead find some other clinical experience that you do enjoy, and with people that you enjoy as well.
     
    Sardinia and celts5 like this.
  20. HinduHammer

    HinduHammer We Do Not Sow 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    08.06.13
    Messages:
    634
    Location:
    Starfall
    Status:
    Medical Student
    As a former chief ED Scribe, in short: scribing is great for 3-6 months - you learn a lot, you see really cool things, you get to talk to physicians, learn the healthcare system, etc. After 6 months, it really starts to suck. For me, overnight shifts while working 2 other job and classes = SUCK. Scribe drama, them blaming each other, them blaming you (the trainer/chief scribe) = SUCK. Having to cover shifts for scribes who sleep through their shift or have a car whatever = SUCK. 12 hour shifts with no break = SUCK. Seeing one cool patient for every 20 people that are drug seekers, not really sick, or just old = SUCK.

    However, it has opened a lot of doors for me. I left to become the chief scribe and other responsibilities in a free clinic, which has just been great.

    Anyway to the OP, as a trainer and former chief scribe -- it is not uncommon for this to happen. Frankly, be grateful that you got cut early in a way, because it sounds like the program was malignant and would have been difficult. Plus, scribing nowadays is a dime a dozen. Better to do some clinical and non clinical volunteering and do medically related things you really love.
     
    Sardinia and cjfarrell21 like this.
  21. zzxxzz

    zzxxzz 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    01.13.12
    Messages:
    639
    Tutoring is a whole different story. You'd be shocked at how little work people expect to do for the grade/score they want. For my MCAT company, we get tutoring candidates who expect 9+ increases in their score after ~15 hours of work, and who'll downrate you if they don't get it.

    That being said, I have hundreds of hours of independent, un-supervised direct patient care from being a CNA. Basically show up, talk to the nurse for 5 minutes, then for the next 8 hours the well-being of 10 people is entirely in your hands. I've seen things that would make most people puke, I've dealt with a huge variety of patients, many with dementia, I've had to talk to families about the grim outlook of their loved ones and with completely unrealistic situations. I've had patients die, been in difficult ethical medical situations, diffused conflicts/dangerous situations with combative patients, and have awesome bedside manner from interacting with angry, confused, and scared patients on an hourly basis. You can't get that from volunteering.

    Also, working as a CNA is great exercise! And it all depends on your background. As someone who worked very strenuous manual labor/blue-collar jobs throughout life, working as a CNA wasn't close to my toughest job.
     
    lumpyduster likes this.
  22. dabake

    dabake 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    06.20.13
    Messages:
    33
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    It wasn't a "rough" first shift, but more a "rough" shift in general that had me let go with my scribe job. It was my second to last shift of my 10 shift training period and it was during finals week so I was naturally sleep-deprived. I was scheduled with the chief scribe and it was my first shift in the full ER. Before then, every shift I had was working the Fast Track, a glorified Urgent Care dealing with ear infections and rhinitis. Then I was immediately thrown into a full ER with the cheif scribe with two levels 2 to start the shift. I was behind from the beginning and was playing catch-up the entire shift. After my "training review", I was let go. At first, I was really mad at them for forcing me into that situation but I understand that medicine can be a sink or swim atmosphere and it was up to me to survive that pressure. Scribing takes a certain kind of individual and personality to succeed and I didn't make the cut.
     
  23. usmleq

    usmleq 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    05.04.12
    Messages:
    39
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    And you think you're going to make it through a residency?
     
  24. mehc012

    mehc012 Big Damn Hero 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.09.12
    Messages:
    8,312
    Location:
    The Black
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Lol, scribe, because nothing makes me feel as ****ty as patting myself on the back for doing something absolutely useless to the point where no one cares. If no one cares whether I do my job, shoot me in the face, because it means that when I do work, I'm just a hamster on a wheel, running in circles for my own self-delusion that I'm doing anything.

    I want a job where I can be passionate enough about it to work around the clock. Hell, I just volunteered for an 8hr overnight shift against company policy because I enjoyed working and it would benefit the doc a lot on his last day. No one asked me to, I just did it...and it was actually really helpful. Give me that kind of job, where people actually appreciate it, and I enjoy it enough to do it for free (which is essentially what scribing's crap wage works out to once I pay for the gas to get there and the food I buy on a 12hr shift).
     
  25. IL Pre Med

    IL Pre Med 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    10.11.12
    Messages:
    684
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    +1 you sound like a whiny little kid, maybe medicine isn't for you
     
  26. tymont12

    tymont12 But it can't be two illnesses! 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    06.28.11
    Messages:
    295
    Status:
    Medical Student
    ?? Residency is inherently difficult and is way different than an employer taking advantage of (Read: illegally exploiting) workers like CNA's who are capped at sub-$11/hr and most likely without benefits.
     
    blueharbor likes this.
  27. gtbROX

    gtbROX 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    04.08.11
    Messages:
    287
    Location:
    Bay Area
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)


    I have not gotten fired by my scribe company, but even if I did, I'd simply apply for another one. I don't know what your location is like, but there are 2-3 Scribe companies that have locations near or at a commutable distance to me. Your old scribe company does not have access to your med app so just don't mention this rejection anywhere. Chin up and move on.

    I can't speak to your situation because I wasn't there to see if you were being lazy or if your instructors sucked. That being said, I went through a Scribe program that provides intense online education prior to the bedside training sessions, but I became a proficient scribe through being thrown into the ED. If you make mistakes, find out the nature of your mistake and don't make the same mistake. Know how to google or at least act like you already tried google before asking questions. When you ask doctors questions, ask them sincerely and give off a vibe that you're genuinely curious. These are just my tips whether you already know this or not.

    Main Point: Apply to a different company. If no other companies exist, shadow nearby doctors and ask them if you can act as a volunteer scribe for them. Email/Call your local EDs and see if they have or are willing to take on a medical scribe.
     
    sg808 and IslandStyle808 like this.
  28. zzxxzz

    zzxxzz 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    01.13.12
    Messages:
    639
    You realize most CNAs are doing this for their career, right? This isn't medical school. CNAs aren't getting huge pay raises or promotions, or benefits, or future respect. Just letting people know the sometimes bleak reality of a pretty essential - and pretty overlooked - medical field.
     
    blueharbor, Gurby and lumpyduster like this.
  29. Strudel19

    Strudel19 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.14.11
    Messages:
    513
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    hSDN
    Member
    hSDN
    Alumni
    I was a scribe. It's a tough job with a steep learning curve. My training was terrible, so I understand what OP is saying about him being fired because their lack of training. Many hospitals have their own internal scribe program rather than a hired company. On top of that, because hospitals are slowly becoming more accustomed to the idea of training their own scribes, the programs are new and training/structure hasn't been perfected
     
    Sardinia likes this.
  30. swolebrah

    swolebrah Misc Brah. Hugh Myron? 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    10.30.13
    Messages:
    560
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    Bro your mad at trainers? Wait till you get those doctors who treat their scribes like medical student interns .

    Brb if your not 15 min early your late
    Brb 2 minute for bathroom and lunch break in a 10 hour shift .
    Brb how do you not know the (ddx)differentials for some very specific abdominal pain disposition .
    Brb you work your best and you forget that one comma ...you suck at scribing lemme insult you in front of all of staff + patients
    Brb keep trying to out "man " you cause your 225 6'3 10% bf and physically intimidate the doosh/bro fresh out of residency doctor

    Besides from that steep learning curve period (~3-4 months ) , it's good experience . Realize it's just a stepping stone . Pay sucks and hours suck even more :) I'm just waiting on MCAT results to come in , ask for my LOR, and get the **** out of scribing.

    For the record my trainers didn't really help, it was more of learn from your mistake or keep getting harassed by trainers .
     
    Last edited: 09.23.14
    Sardinia likes this.
  31. jl lin

    jl lin 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    10.09.09
    Messages:
    5,051

    Seriously, as a RN that has worked in pretty intense areas, well, you get both the suckage of being a scribe, as well as that of CNA, and as well as that of being, well a nurse (meaning being responsible and wearing many hats and trying to keep everyone happy--really not often possible--and killing yourself with defensive charting and lab f/u's and doctor verbal orders and all sorts of f/u stuff.) The good news is there were/are positive sides to the role as well.

    Healthcare in general is just a total trip to work in. . .seriously. There are some that have it a little nicer. They get paid less, but they go home on time, work days, no holidays or weekends, etc. Like I said, a lot of healthcare in general is just a wild area in which to work.

    Sorry to OP about the scribe position not working out. I also agree with tymont in that often enough what you invest in people is what you will get out of them. Trouble that I've seen in healthcare and nursing is that many folks really don't have a clue how to teach, direct, and mentor people. Seriously. I have seen it as a HUGE issue in nursing. It's kind of sad.
     
  32. mehc012

    mehc012 Big Damn Hero 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.09.12
    Messages:
    8,312
    Location:
    The Black
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Yes yes, your life is harder than everyone else's. Seriously, the one thing I've learned in healthcare thus far is that you have to bow down to everyone and profess your utter admiration for how their job is the hardest...and then do the same thing with the next person, and the next one, and the next one. Doctors, nurses, CNAs, surgeons, hospitalists, you name it, you will at some point have to sit through a convo about how they have it hardest. It's probably my least favorite aspect of the industry, even beyond the crazy rules and the paperwork.
     
    Mr Roboto likes this.
  33. Hospitalized

    Hospitalized Caspase Cascade 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    09.08.14
    Messages:
    1,786
    Location:
    Cytoplasm
    MDApps:
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Considering medical school is a huge time commitment, wouldn't scribing be the optimal thing to do in order to get accustomed to future lifestyle?

    Taking on medical school is an enormous responsibility, as is being a physician. Sitting and studying while "volunteering" isn't the most proactive preparation. Premeds should be exploring the field and getting simulated to the lifestyle before it's too late. Scribing may have its downfalls but the experience is invaluable. I've trained with scribes who are now wishing they pursued a different path. The ultimate goal of a job like scribing is to inform and help the individual find their niche, why would you discourage that?
     
  34. jl lin

    jl lin 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    10.09.09
    Messages:
    5,051

    In spite of your toxic, negative, and condescending tone, your comment actually helps make my point re: this generally crappy phenomena in healthcare. Unlike you, however, I haven't let it make me bitter,resentful, or negative. You don't even know what beat up is yet. Sadly, I hate say it, but you will learn...either the easier way or the harder way. Step 1 is maybe checking your attitude. Let's see where that goes.

    Personally, I wish I could wave a wand and make miserable people happy, but life doesn't work like that. Regardless, I wish you well in your endeavors...sincerely.
     
  35. mehc012

    mehc012 Big Damn Hero 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.09.12
    Messages:
    8,312
    Location:
    The Black
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I'm not miserable...I love my job and I love my coworkers. I'm also not beat up...I just pulled an overnight shift after my day shift with no pay because I am young and I can, and because it was fun, and I wanted to help my doc out. My comment had nothing to do with my experience, how much I work, etc...it was a reaction to your post bitching about how you had it the hardest of all. You may dislike my attitude and that's fine, but I see yours not only as incredibly annoying, but as a pervasive plague in the healthcare community in general. Everyone seems to talk constantly about how their job is the most onerous of all. And yes, I am being negative here - your comment pissed me off. That doesn't mean that I am angry at EVERYthing, just at you, so how about we not turn this into 'mehc012 is a miserable resentful person overall' when in fact I was only miserable and resentful while reading your whiny, self-absorbed post.

    In other words: get over yourself, your life isn't the hardest thing ever just because you're a nurse. That is all I was trying to say in my initial post.
     
    Aerus likes this.
  36. Aerus

    Aerus Elemental Alchemist 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    04.20.12
    Messages:
    2,992
    Location:
    Pool of Memories
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    hSDN
    Member
    hSDN
    Alumni
    I'm not sure if it's your reading comprehension, your attempt at a strawman, or a bit of both but your post literally contained nothing relevant to the post you quoted.


    Sent from The World Tree using SDN Mobile
     
    mehc012 likes this.
  37. jl lin

    jl lin 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    10.09.09
    Messages:
    5,051

    Nope. Never said had it hardest of all. That's you reading into that, and frankly, it was rude and unnecessary. It's not about one particular job per se. It's the strain of the HC environment. And as much as residents can get dumped on, nurses get dumped on a lot too. You just have to accept it and roll with it. Hasn't made me bitter in many years of practice. I accept it for what it is. It's unfortunate that you are making personal assumptions about others instead of just listening to their perspective openly. BTW, my life was hard way before becoming a RN, trust me. If you want to interpret it as whiny and self-absorbed, that's your prerogative. You are wrong, and that's OK also.

    Your reply, "Get over yourself" is really an act of projective, I feel. It came out of nowhere, was extreme and closed, and completely unnecessary. BTW, that you would be, lol, 'angry at me,' as you say above-- a totally anonymous person on a boar-- for posting one person's perspective, well, meh, that says tons about you. Good luck to you.
     
  38. jl lin

    jl lin 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    10.09.09
    Messages:
    5,051

    I don't have time to teach you reading comprehension. If you read the person's reply, it further demonstrates a silly, personal attack on an anonymous person online. Pretty silly. There was no wish for some p!ssing contest about who has it the worst. :) Sadly, there is just too much toxicity in healthcare in general. Personally, I think some folks get resentful when they begin to see that it's not what they thought it would be, and then they just attack or insult or become generally difficult with others. It's like that whole crap runs downhill thing in healthcare too. Reality bites at times, but it is your friend.
     
  39. mehc012

    mehc012 Big Damn Hero 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.09.12
    Messages:
    8,312
    Location:
    The Black
    Status:
    Medical Student
    "You get the suckage of a scribe AND a CNA AND a nurse" aka your position is the worst out of all of the above.
    That is what I was responding to, and yes, that does indicate that you think your job is harder than the other positions.
    I don't know why you keep talking about residents, that was never a part of the conversation.
    You're not bitter, but you're whining. OK, that's not much of an improvement.
    I'm not making assumptions, I am reacting to a specific statement. Your statement was whiny and self-absorbed. I, however, am according to your posts a miserable person who feels beaten up by their job and is bitter, despite that I never said any of those things. So, yeah, let's go with me making the assumptions here :rolleyes:
    Also, not sure why it's relevant that your life used to be hard.
    I will and I do. Thanks for the permission (even given as an act of condescension.) :vomit:
    I've explained what prompted my posts...if you still feel that it 'came out of nowhere' you may want to reread.
    This sentence is nigh impossible to read, but I'll take a stab at a response: yes, one post can be enough to anger me, just as one conversation in real life can be enough to irritate almost anyone, depending on content.[/quote][/QUOTE]
     
  40. mehc012

    mehc012 Big Damn Hero 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.09.12
    Messages:
    8,312
    Location:
    The Black
    Status:
    Medical Student
    You WERE the one pissing on people about who has it worst.
    That IS the toxicity that bothers me. I was annoyed because YOU were a straight-up example of healthcare toxicity.


    I am not resentful, I love my job and my life, and I am in no way disappointed by healthcare. Please stop pretending that I have posted complaints about my job in this thread when I have not. And please stop condescending to me by making up some psychobabble BS that's not even based on things I've said.
     
  41. jl lin

    jl lin 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    10.09.09
    Messages:
    5,051


    Seriously your responses are quite reactionary. I see why you have Billy Goat Gruff under your moniker. Wow. Here's a hint. Try to avoid being so easily irritated by other people's POVs or what they share. And FYI, nurses do a lot of scribe-type work among a ton of other stuff. They have it great in some ways and not so great in others, depending on where they work and other factors. Why the polarization? It's extreme. And regardless of what you may believe, no. You cannot kill me or another else with your brain. ;) Chill out before you pop an aneurism.
     
  42. Mr Roboto

    Mr Roboto 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.31.13
    Messages:
    747
    Location:
    A galaxy far, far away...
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I wasn't fired immediately after training, but that's because I did a kick ass job and had a good attitude.

    I have, however, fired people immediately after training while working as a chief scribe. Mostly for incompetence and ****ty attitudes ;)
     
    ndafife and jl lin like this.
  43. mehc012

    mehc012 Big Damn Hero 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.09.12
    Messages:
    8,312
    Location:
    The Black
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Actually, I'm Billy Goat Gruff because I'm not bothered by trolls :laugh: I think they instigate interesting discussions despite their own best efforts and should be responded to, not ignored.

    And nope, I'm not going to stop being irritated by someone who feels the need to point out that their job is harder than all of the other jobs. It's unnecessary and rude, and decreases camaraderie in the workplace. I get along wonderfully with my nurses, because we try to make each other's jobs easier without worrying about who has it worse. We always have each other's backs and will point out errors in each other's work (constructively) so it can be fixed before it is finalized, as well as giving each other encouragement and general head's-ups. Trust me, I do know and understand what the nurses' duties entail, and I have nothing but respect for the profession. That does not, however, mean that I respect whining. There are a few who make comments like your initial one, and I hate working with them. Even if I agree with them (depends on the day), it's unnecessary and rude. It essentially says 'shut up, your difficulties do not matter because I have difficulties of my own.'

    The killing with the brain is a quote from an awesome show. You should watch it.

    Anyway, you are going on the Ignore list now because this is not the first illogical, unrepentant, rude convo I have witnessed or participated in with you and I feel that you are unlikely to contribute a useful perspective for me in the future. I don't mind people who disagree with me (in fact I encourage it as it leads to educational discussions), but to make it personal so quickly, and to persist in poor logic and condescension...nope, time to ignore.
     
    Last edited: 09.24.14
  44. jl lin

    jl lin 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    10.09.09
    Messages:
    5,051
    Regarding the reference, I know what it is.

    Your irritation is your issue and yours alone (the individual's). This may not help you, b/c you have to be open to receive things in order to learn and grow and be truly happy, but here goes:

    “The greatest day in your life and mine is when we take total responsibility for our attitudes. That's the day we truly grow up.”
    ― John C. Maxwell

    Conversation over.
     
  45. Mx300

    Mx300 New Member 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.14.05
    Messages:
    138
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I feel your pain, I had a ****ty experiance with a scribe company. It involved poor trainers and a blatantly obvious discrimination situation. I felt they were gonna fire me so I actually quit before they could. It was such a shame because I loved my job but there was such a mess at corporate that it was ridiculous. Also dont listen to people on here raggin on you. I know what these companies are like, they take advantage of pre-meds and treat them like dirt. I had people from corporate literally yelling at me for a mistake that they made.
     
  46. maxknux

    maxknux Pre-Medical

    Joined:
    07.15.13
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Dearborn Heights, MI
    MDApps:
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    You can add me to the list. Three 8 hour classroom training days. There are 6 training shifts but I was fired on the third day which was today.

    I am not mad at least I had the experience but kind of sad but relieved because I was stressed before each shift trying to practice the HPI and other sections of the Chart.
     
    won'tstop likes this.
  47. MDrocker

    MDrocker

    Joined:
    10.17.15
    Messages:
    75
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I feel you bro. My junior project leader (chief scribe) told me on my 3rd day of training that I wasn't up to their standards. There was no advance warning or an extra couple days for me to show improvement. They just said "we have to let you go because you're not up to our standards". To be fair, I was not capturing the full information in my documentation from the physician to the patient, but I was working super hard and really trying to get the whole multitasking thing down. Too bad I couldn't do anything about it. I just had to accept the decision and leave, but I was there was a second chance or some time for me to prove my worth the scribe company :(
     
    Sardinia likes this.
  48. Matthew9Thirtyfive

    Matthew9Thirtyfive Foxy.

    Joined:
    01.10.16
    Messages:
    1,419
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Verified
    Navy
    You realize this thread is from two years ago, right?
     
  49. MDrocker

    MDrocker

    Joined:
    10.17.15
    Messages:
    75
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    So? I can still reply to it can't I? I just recently got fired like yesterday so I was looking for posts where other people have gotten fired in similar circumstances.
     
    Sardinia and nignogger like this.
  50. Matthew9Thirtyfive

    Matthew9Thirtyfive Foxy.

    Joined:
    01.10.16
    Messages:
    1,419
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Verified
    Navy
    I don't care, but necro posting is sometimes discouraged.
     
  51. nm06003

    nm06003 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    02.06.13
    Messages:
    109


    Reapply to another scribe company. You'll have an upper hand the second time around. Ignore the other guy about posting an old thread.


    Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
     

About the ads

Share This Page