Have you become obsessively lazy and nearing a case of chronic obesity?

Zakaqel

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2008
159
0
Status
Ever since I started college, I’ve become increasing lazy and gained more pounds than I would have liked to. During high school I used to play sports daily, now I drive to the neighborhood drug store (1 minute walk) to buy various types of chocolate bars. I ask people to get me glasses of water, turn on the TV and other things that require minimal amounts of energy. My day has just become random combinations of going to the library, sleeping, going to class, working at lab, going to the bathroom, driving, messing around on the computer, studying, etc. My diet isn’t healthy at all; it’s mostly composed of cup noodles (staple) and burgers from various fast food restaurants on campus. I’m expecting to hit the 200 pound mark (I’m 6’1”) a couple of weeks from now.

I tried changing my habits and worked out the whole of last semester. Sadly, I stopped doing it because of all the work and stress levels (I don’t feel like going to the gym after bombing exams/other painful experiences). Currently, body movement includes waling to class and typing on the computer. I’ve come to believe that the current educational system is very unhealthy.

I fear that I’ll be obese when I get my first interview. How will I explain my lack of interest in my health when I want to become a doctor?

Anyone in the same situation?
 

Cegar

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Feb 17, 2008
1,053
2
Status
I do not exercise much anymore but I also eat a lot less.

I've lost weight since high school. Not much though, so that's good.

You should probably stop eating ****ty food. You can still buy rice, cabbage, potatoes, and other cheap vegetables for less than the cost of burgers.

Although it's hard to pass up 10 cents/bag of ramen.
 

emcee

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Feb 2, 2008
31
1
Status
You gotta have Self-Discipline! Talk to yourself! Instead of driving to the neighborhood drug store, try to force yourself to walk there somehow.
 
About the Ads

135892

Guest
10+ Year Member
Feb 5, 2007
1,367
4
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Whats the point of this thread?

You either care to lose weight and become healthy, and go about accomplishing this. Or, you don't care about losing weight, in which case you continue doing what you're doing...
 

zenlike

I'll see you in health.
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Feb 13, 2008
418
1
Status
Medical Student
Sadly, I stopped doing it because of all the work and stress levels (I don’t feel like going to the gym after bombing exams/other painful experiences).
Exercise is a good stress management tool. Going to the gym is exactly what you should do if you're feeling stressed.
 

ChubbyChaser

Yummmy
10+ Year Member
Apr 14, 2007
13,168
6
Status
Medical Student
haha
 

HumidBeing

In Memory of Riley Jane
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
Jun 19, 2007
18,699
7
Keeping Warm
Status
Nope, I don't have that problem at all. I don't get as much exercise as I used to, but I do eat well.

Your excuse for not exercising is a really bad one. Exercise is a stress RELIEVER.

You could start by getting up and getting your own darned glass of water, and instead of asking others to change the channel, get up and push the OFF button and go for a brisk walk without stopping for fast food.
 

surfstarj

10+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2007
558
2
Status
Medical Student
6'1" 200 doesn't seem fat to me...but i'm used to being around athletes. Are you being serious?
 

MattD

Curmudgeon
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Oct 9, 2003
1,444
2
www.yellow5.com
Status
Resident [Any Field]
6'1" 200 doesn't seem fat to me...but i'm used to being around athletes. Are you being serious?
6'1 @ 200 is a BMI of about 26.5, which is strictly overweight (25-29.9), although not by a ton. A weight of 140-190 lb falls in the 'normal weight' range of BMI (18.5-24.9). Obviously, that's a wide range, and gender, build, etc. should be taken into account when trying to figure out a 'healthy' weight to be. Athletes often have a higher BMI than non-athletes simply due to the density of all the muscle they're carrying around, which is why BMI should be used as a guide only, and should be coupled with a body-fat measurement for full information.

I'm assuming that the OP is not carrying around a lot of muscle, and therefore could stand to lose a few pounds. Hey, me too :) You sound like you just started college. Keep working on developing better time management skills, so that you can find a little more time to exercise. Assuming your tube time isn't the same time you're spending studying (ie. background noise), substitute a 30 min jog for your least favorite tv show every day or every other day. Or, go work out at the gym to pack on some muscle. More active muscle = higher BMR. Eating well can be hard if you don't know how to do it. Find someone to teach you. Does your student health center employ a nutritionist?

Good luck to you, I hope you can find a good balance that will allow you to stay healthy. It takes a little effort, but you'll feel so much better!
 

surfstarj

10+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2007
558
2
Status
Medical Student
6'1 @ 200 is a BMI of about 26.5, which is strictly overweight (25-29.9), although not by a ton. A weight of 140-190 lb falls in the 'normal weight' range of BMI (18.5-24.9). Obviously, that's a wide range, and gender, build, etc. should be taken into account when trying to figure out a 'healthy' weight to be. Athletes often have a higher BMI than non-athletes simply due to the density of all the muscle they're carrying around, which is why BMI should be used as a guide only, and should be coupled with a body-fat measurement for full information.

I'm assuming that the OP is not carrying around a lot of muscle, and therefore could stand to lose a few pounds. Hey, me too :) You sound like you just started college. Keep working on developing better time management skills, so that you can find a little more time to exercise. Assuming your tube time isn't the same time you're spending studying (ie. background noise), substitute a 30 min jog for your least favorite tv show every day or every other day. Or, go work out at the gym to pack on some muscle. More active muscle = higher BMR. Eating well can be hard if you don't know how to do it. Find someone to teach you. Does your student health center employ a nutritionist?

Good luck to you, I hope you can find a good balance that will allow you to stay healthy. It takes a little effort, but you'll feel so much better!

Sure, but the basic BMI calculation doesn't exactly work like a charm.

I'm an athlete in heavy training at the moment: 5'8" 150 lbs so by the standard calc I'm 23.6. I'm actually between 15.8 and 16.2% by a 7-site skinfold and hydrostatic measure. My point being, the OP should try to be healthy rather than worry about the number so much. Move around a little, do some weight bearing activity and clean up your diet, even if you don't lose weight, you'd still be healthier. I know you know that much, you wouldn't have started a thread if you did not. Cliche as it is, the hardest part is getting started. I think the key to getting over the laziness factor is to just do *something* even if it's not strictly considered working out, just moving around would start you off. Be mindful of the amount of time you spend just sitting down, try to break it up with some activity. Hopefully you'll feel better.
 

Hurricane95

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jun 18, 2005
910
4
Miami, FL
Status
Resident [Any Field]
What are you going to tell them if they ask...? um, I don't think there's much to say besides the truth..you yourself have said you've gotten lazy and don't seem to care so...I don't know what to tell you. Get up and start exercising man...the fat doesn't burn itself off. Most people in this country can't really blame their obesity on anything but their laziness and bad habits (very few people actually have a leptin insensitivity/deficiency or some kind of true metabolic problem).

Eat better and less, and exercise. I don't mean to be harsh, but...it's that simple. If you think your apathy has some kind of psychological component (eating extra because you're depressed, etc.) then seek help. Otherwise, just get to it and start taking care of yourself before your body decides to make insulin it's red-headed stepchild for good.
 
About the Ads

RySerr21

i aint kinda hot Im sauna
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2007
5,931
27
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Sure, but the basic BMI calculation doesn't exactly work like a charm.

I'm an athlete in heavy training at the moment: 5'8" 150 lbs so by the standard calc I'm 23.6. I'm actually between 15.8 and 16.2% by a 7-site skinfold and hydrostatic measure. My point being, the OP should try to be healthy rather than worry about the number so much. Move around a little, do some weight bearing activity and clean up your diet, even if you don't lose weight, you'd still be healthier. I know you know that much, you wouldn't have started a thread if you did not. Cliche as it is, the hardest part is getting started. I think the key to getting over the laziness factor is to just do *something* even if it's not strictly considered working out, just moving around would start you off. Be mindful of the amount of time you spend just sitting down, try to break it up with some activity. Hopefully you'll feel better.
BMI doenst work like a charm for athletes like yourself b/c it doesn't take into consideration body composition. obviously if you are a NFL player and weigh a lot due to large muscle mass, you are not obese...despite what the BMI tells you

the OP has told us that he has virtually no exercise so certainly doesnt compete in athletics. for his/her situation, and a sedentary population in genreal, the BMI is more accurate.
 
OP
Zakaqel

Zakaqel

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2008
159
0
Status
Start by cleaning up your diet to include mostly whole(unchanged/unprocessed) fruits and vegetables, and use every opportunity to be physically active. Walk to class/the store, take the steps, etc. This won't interfere with your schoolwork. Once you start making progress I guarantee that you will become more and more passionate about becoming physically fit, and when you care about something you'll be able to find the time. Don't pay attention to the numbers. If you eat cleanly and work in more and more physical activity into your daily life everything will fall into place. No one wants to be out of shape but unfortunately the US creates an environment in which it's very easy to fall into the category of obesity/poor health. Never tell yourself that there's nothing you can do to change it, possibly because you have "bad genes" or something equally as ridiculous, like I've seen many overweight individuals do. People want good news about their bad habits and telling themselves that it isn't their fault is an easy out. Fortunately, it is their fault, thus they can change it. If you follow this pattern of laziness and an unclean diet, you will become another statistic when you find yourself in a doctors office being told that you have Type 2 Diabetes or Heart Disease.

Good luck, and don't give up!

Dr. Kelso: Nothing in this world that's worth having comes easy.

[youtube]uAeuChXAMKk[/youtube]
LOL...nice video
 

Omyss

Member
10+ Year Member
Jul 25, 2006
375
0
Status
Ever since I started college, I’ve become increasing lazy and gained more pounds than I would have liked to. During high school I used to play sports daily, now I drive to the neighborhood drug store (1 minute walk) to buy various types of chocolate bars. I ask people to get me glasses of water, turn on the TV and other things that require minimal amounts of energy. My day has just become random combinations of going to the library, sleeping, going to class, working at lab, going to the bathroom, driving, messing around on the computer, studying, etc. My diet isn’t healthy at all; it’s mostly composed of cup noodles (staple) and burgers from various fast food restaurants on campus. I’m expecting to hit the 200 pound mark (I’m 6’1”) a couple of weeks from now.

I tried changing my habits and worked out the whole of last semester. Sadly, I stopped doing it because of all the work and stress levels (I don’t feel like going to the gym after bombing exams/other painful experiences). Currently, body movement includes waling to class and typing on the computer. I’ve come to believe that the current educational system is very unhealthy.

I fear that I’ll be obese when I get my first interview. How will I explain my lack of interest in my health when I want to become a doctor?

Anyone in the same situation?
no
 

MossPoh

Textures intrigue me
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Apr 24, 2006
7,990
45
Tally/Willkillya County
psu.facebook.com
Status
Medical Student
The BMI calculations are crap, especially when people are taller. I'm 6'5" and the LIGHTEST I've been since 8th grade is 220. If I were to start serious cardio and dieting I might hit 215...but I'd be skinny. My normal healthy non-exercising weight is 230 and when I was lifting I was peaking at 255. BMI would say I was way overweight, but I was around 9% body fat, so that wasn't the case. Right now my BMI is 27.9. During my football training/powerlifting days I would've been at a 30.1, which is considered obsese. If you saw me you'd think I was anything but obese.

But yea, even when I don't get to go to the gym I make the effort to walk everywhere on campus. I take the stairs always, regardless of how many floors. I eat fairly unhealthy, but I keep the proportions on the lower side and do little things like skip in the sides. I haven't been in the gym since last October or so, but I haven't packed on any weight. So, just pay attention to the little things.
 

pride4jc727

10+ Year Member
Aug 23, 2007
730
1
Status
Medical Student
No, I have been trying to do whatever I can to get off the waitlists at two med schools and am still waiting on another school to make its decision. Thus, I have been doing school work and going to the gym. When my roommate is around, I take night runs with him so I try to stay on top everything, literally.
 

MattD

Curmudgeon
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Oct 9, 2003
1,444
2
www.yellow5.com
Status
Resident [Any Field]
The BMI calculations are crap, especially when people are taller. I'm 6'5" and the LIGHTEST I've been since 8th grade is 220. If I were to start serious cardio and dieting I might hit 215...but I'd be skinny. My normal healthy non-exercising weight is 230 and when I was lifting I was peaking at 255. BMI would say I was way overweight, but I was around 9% body fat, so that wasn't the case. Right now my BMI is 27.9. During my football training/powerlifting days I would've been at a 30.1, which is considered obsese. If you saw me you'd think I was anything but obese.
The OP isn't an outlier height-wise, and the BMI calcs are fine for someone 5'10. Especially a sedentary 5'10. Remember, the dividing lines set up for BMI are based on statistics and averages, and the average person for that given height and weight will be overweight. Athletes aren't average.

Sure, but the basic BMI calculation doesn't exactly work like a charm.

I'm an athlete in heavy training at the moment: 5'8" 150 lbs so by the standard calc I'm 23.6. I'm actually between 15.8 and 16.2% by a 7-site skinfold and hydrostatic measure. My point being, the OP should try to be healthy rather than worry about the number so much.
Did you actually read my post before responding to it, or were you skimming between sets? I basically gave the exact same disclaimer. At any rate, someone who's that height and weight, who's gained 10-20 lb in a short time while eating poorly and exercising sparingly, probably isn't packing on muscle. More likely a gut. But feel free to pick nits.
 

ChubbyChaser

Yummmy
10+ Year Member
Apr 14, 2007
13,168
6
Status
Medical Student
No
 

SaveThisLabRat

$700 Billion Dollar Woman
10+ Year Member
Mar 27, 2007
1,095
1
California *\o/*
Status
Pre-Pharmacy
I recommend you continue to gain weight until you can no longer get out of bed to go to class, are expelled from school and leave an open space for the rest of us.
 
About the Ads

StayFocused

10+ Year Member
Feb 12, 2008
28
0
Status
Pre-Medical
whey protein, creatine, multivitamin, weight room 45 minutes a day, 4 days a week.

problem solved.
 
OP
Zakaqel

Zakaqel

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2008
159
0
Status
I recommend you continue to gain weight until you can no longer get out of bed to go to class, are expelled from school and leave an open space for the rest of us.
YEAH..good Idea..then I can worry about finding out where you live so I can sit on you and make you cry...
 

surfstarj

10+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2007
558
2
Status
Medical Student
whey protein, creatine, multivitamin, weight room 45 minutes a day, 4 days a week.

problem solved.

Mmm creatine. That's such a good idea. If you don't mind liver failure and water-swollen muscles.
 

surfstarj

10+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2007
558
2
Status
Medical Student
Did you actually read my post before responding to it, or were you skimming between sets? I basically gave the exact same disclaimer. At any rate, someone who's that height and weight, who's gained 10-20 lb in a short time while eating poorly and exercising sparingly, probably isn't packing on muscle. More likely a gut. But feel free to pick nits.
My only point was that the OP shouldn't worry about numbers. Just getting healthier.
 

coldweatherblue

10+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2007
1,085
8
Status
Medical Student
lol, after taking biochem whenever I exercise I always think "now my latent ATP stores are gone, I'm starting to use phosphocreatine, ugh, go kreb's cycle go!!!"

exercise because it makes you feel awesome and it's good for your health. Just get out and do it. You know what you want, make yourself do the work to obtain it... it all boils down to self-discipline.
 

AUD

10+ Year Member
Mar 10, 2008
115
0
Delaware
Status
Medical Student
I agree with the above posters. Making a thread on a pre-med forum isn't going to change anything. Get out there and do something; if you don't like going to the gym and think running is mindless, then swim, or play a sport. To quote Gatorade, "Is IT in you?"
 

kansaskid

too school for cool
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Apr 20, 2008
695
0
the Djougs
Status
Pre-Medical
Ever since I started college, I’ve become increasing lazy and gained more pounds than I would have liked to. During high school I used to play sports daily, now I drive to the neighborhood drug store (1 minute walk) to buy various types of chocolate bars. I ask people to get me glasses of water, turn on the TV and other things that require minimal amounts of energy. My day has just become random combinations of going to the library, sleeping, going to class, working at lab, going to the bathroom, driving, messing around on the computer, studying, etc. My diet isn’t healthy at all; it’s mostly composed of cup noodles (staple) and burgers from various fast food restaurants on campus. I’m expecting to hit the 200 pound mark (I’m 6’1”) a couple of weeks from now.

I tried changing my habits and worked out the whole of last semester. Sadly, I stopped doing it because of all the work and stress levels (I don’t feel like going to the gym after bombing exams/other painful experiences). Currently, body movement includes waling to class and typing on the computer. I’ve come to believe that the current educational system is very unhealthy.

I fear that I’ll be obese when I get my first interview. How will I explain my lack of interest in my health when I want to become a doctor?

Anyone in the same situation?
Not anymore! I just recently started running again (used to run 5mi/day in high school) and I'm up to three miles every other day or so. I'm also working on the ole dietary habits and doing pretty good! I feel so much better than I used to, happier, stronger, healthier...staying in shape is super important for me, too. I tend to get depressed out here on the east coast (so much rainy weather, no sun!) and exercising keeps those endorphins flowing. I am definitely going to keep it up, and maybe run a 5K this summer. I have this long term goal of running the Boston marathon before I graduate and having the specific goal keeps me active.
Good luck!
 

Zyvox

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Mar 27, 2007
94
0
Status
Pre-Pharmacy
I've converted to a strict vegetarian lately. My face has a healthy glow to it, and I feel so much better. You guys should try it. It's hard but so worth it. :)
 

kansaskid

too school for cool
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Apr 20, 2008
695
0
the Djougs
Status
Pre-Medical
I've converted to a strict vegetarian lately. My face has a healthy glow to it, and I feel so much better. You guys should try it. It's hard but so worth it. :)
I've been a vegetarian for about 5 years and while I think it's definitely a healthy way to eat, it's pretty easy to be a junk food veg..."Hmmm, this ho-ho doesn't have any meat in it!":p
 

Zyvox

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Mar 27, 2007
94
0
Status
Pre-Pharmacy
I've been a vegetarian for about 5 years and while I think it's definitely a healthy way to eat, it's pretty easy to be a junk food veg..."Hmmm, this ho-ho doesn't have any meat in it!":p
Yeah I've cut out all sugars and processed foods. Definitely no junk food. Sucks sometimes, but the benefits greatly outweigh the taste of Doritos and Cherry Cheesecake and donuts glazed with powdered sugar and filled with Bavarian cream...lol
 
About the Ads

kansaskid

too school for cool
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Apr 20, 2008
695
0
the Djougs
Status
Pre-Medical
Yeah I've cut out all sugars and processed foods. Definitely no junk food. Sucks sometimes, but the benefits greatly outweigh the taste of Doritos and Cherry Cheesecake and donuts glazed with powdered sugar and filled with Bavarian cream...lol
I totally agree...hard to pass up the occasional dessert, though. I let myself indulge every now and then, but I'm pretty hardcore most of the time.:)
 

TexanGirl

runs away from trees
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Sep 18, 2007
1,798
1
somewhere in between hot and frigid
Status
Pre-Medical
Ever since I started college, I’ve become increasing lazy and gained more pounds than I would have liked to. During high school I used to play sports daily, now I drive to the neighborhood drug store (1 minute walk) to buy various types of chocolate bars. I ask people to get me glasses of water, turn on the TV and other things that require minimal amounts of energy. My day has just become random combinations of going to the library, sleeping, going to class, working at lab, going to the bathroom, driving, messing around on the computer, studying, etc. My diet isn’t healthy at all; it’s mostly composed of cup noodles (staple) and burgers from various fast food restaurants on campus. I’m expecting to hit the 200 pound mark (I’m 6’1”) a couple of weeks from now.

I tried changing my habits and worked out the whole of last semester. Sadly, I stopped doing it because of all the work and stress levels (I don’t feel like going to the gym after bombing exams/other painful experiences). Currently, body movement includes waling to class and typing on the computer. I’ve come to believe that the current educational system is very unhealthy.

I fear that I’ll be obese when I get my first interview. How will I explain my lack of interest in my health when I want to become a doctor?

Anyone in the same situation?
Get off your bum and be more active. Not only will you be healthier, but you'll feel happier. Forget your car, walk. (You'll save on gas!) Or, I guess if you must insist on driving, park the car a little further than you usually do, so you can walk a portion of the way at least. Use the stairs instead of the elevator. Take breaks from studying to go for leisurely walks. Get yourself lost somewhere so you can amble around random places and still get physically fit. If you want to be indoors, take a break from studying, blast some music, and just break out into dance. Great de-stressor, and an excellent way to get some much-need exercise. If there's someone you need to contact on campus, GO TO THEM in person. If you find that you speak on the phone while sitting a lot, start pacing while on the phone. You'll find that there are a lot of simple ways to get exercise without even putting forth much effort. Just stay in motion, don't be sedentary.
 

TexanGirl

runs away from trees
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Sep 18, 2007
1,798
1
somewhere in between hot and frigid
Status
Pre-Medical
Oh, and to answer your original question, no, I have not become obsessively lazy and nearing a case of chronic obesity.
 

TheXc

10+ Year Member
Jan 13, 2008
43
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I have a gained a lot of weight also over the pas few years (but I am prepairing for my first bodybuilding comp :p )
 

MattD

Curmudgeon
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Oct 9, 2003
1,444
2
www.yellow5.com
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Mmm creatine. That's such a good idea. If you don't mind liver failure and water-swollen muscles.
My thoughts exactly.. why recommend a bulking regimen to someone who wants to slim down? Especially a bulking regimen of questionable safety.

People who get big tend to increase their body fat in the process, which is why they have to crash diet to get cut right before their competitions. I've never seen an ironhead who was actively bulking and looked even remotely thin or cut. Aerobic exercise will get the fat off. Increased muscle mass / muscle activity will help ramp up the metabolism and keep it off, but dosing with protein (calories) and creatine isn't going to take the fat off...
 

Aynsl156

10+ Year Member
Apr 1, 2007
632
1
Status
Medical Student
whey protein, creatine, multivitamin, weight room 45 minutes a day, 4 days a week.

problem solved.
I just don't get the random fat dudes at the gym who are lifting weights four days a week when they OBVIOUSLY need to get on a treadmill and stay on for an hour a day or so. I mean, come on, you don't need to bulk further.
 

surfstarj

10+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2007
558
2
Status
Medical Student
I just don't get the random fat dudes at the gym who are lifting weights four days a week when they OBVIOUSLY need to get on a treadmill and stay on for an hour a day or so. I mean, come on, you don't need to bulk further.
I know! I'm always surprised what people do in gyms. The random fat dudes probably just can't run on a treadmill but you can keep your heart rate relatively low during a lift, if you want. It's better than nothing, I guess, but everyone needs some cardio! Equally funny are the women who won't touch weights because they're afraid of getting "big." Most women simply do not possess the physical makeup to bulk up. It's really sad because weight bearing activity is really good for preventing bone loss and muscle increases BMR! Sigh...
 
OP
Zakaqel

Zakaqel

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2008
159
0
Status
I just don't get the random fat dudes at the gym who are lifting weights four days a week when they OBVIOUSLY need to get on a treadmill and stay on for an hour a day or so. I mean, come on, you don't need to bulk further.
I've seen really strong/healthy "fat dudes" who work out at the gym. Maybe they're fat on the outside but healthy on the inside? Is that even possible? That's sort of the opposite of me, I look like I'm average on the outside but I feel like I'm 300 pounds on the inside....
 

Aynsl156

10+ Year Member
Apr 1, 2007
632
1
Status
Medical Student
I've seen really strong/healthy "fat dudes" who work out at the gym. Maybe they're fat on the outside but healthy on the inside? Is that even possible? That's sort of the opposite of me, I look like I'm average on the outside but I feel like I'm 300 pounds on the inside....
Strong, okay, I'll give you that. You can train yourself to lift a lot o weight if you're consistent about it. But healthy? That extra fat can't be making their cardiovascular system any healthier. I know the whole BMR argument for doing weight bearing activities, but I think these guys have more immediate issues to tackle here (ie, beer gut) before they should worry about bulking up.
 
OP
Zakaqel

Zakaqel

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2008
159
0
Status
I know! I'm always surprised what people do in gyms. The random fat dudes probably just can't run on a treadmill but you can keep your heart rate relatively low during a lift, if you want. It's better than nothing, I guess, but everyone needs some cardio! Equally funny are the women who won't touch weights because they're afraid of getting "big." Most women simply do not possess the physical makeup to bulk up. It's really sad because weight bearing activity is really good for preventing bone loss and muscle increases BMR! Sigh...
LOL...that just reminded me of someone at the gym who I used to see last semester. This girl had been working out for about 3 years(Every day of the week) and she would go hardcore on the bench-press and would be pumping iron like crazy! I still see her walking around campus and she hasn't grown one inch....it's amazing how hormones can affect your potential...
 

MattD

Curmudgeon
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Oct 9, 2003
1,444
2
www.yellow5.com
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I've seen really strong/healthy "fat dudes" who work out at the gym. Maybe they're fat on the outside but healthy on the inside? Is that even possible? That's sort of the opposite of me, I look like I'm average on the outside but I feel like I'm 300 pounds on the inside....
Being able to pick up large rocks does not make you healthy. The added muscle mass is somewhat protective, but hauling around a bunch of fat is setting them up for lipid problems, insulin resistance problems, cardiovascular problems, etc. Adipose tissue isn't just a cushiony fuel storage reservoir, it's metabolic and endocrine organ that affects all the systems of the body. When you add in the fact that these guys are likely eating the crappiest possible diets (check out the cholesterol per serving of whey protein sometime y'all), they really aren't making themselves healthier than, for instance, the guy who runs on the treadmill or elliptical or swims or bikes for the same amount of time each day.
 
OP
Zakaqel

Zakaqel

Membership Revoked
Removed
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2008
159
0
Status
Strong, okay, I'll give you that. You can train yourself to lift a lot o weight if you're consistent about it. But healthy? That extra fat can't be making their cardiovascular system any healthier. I know the whole BMR argument for doing weight bearing activities, but I think these guys have more immediate issues to tackle here (ie, beer gut) before they should worry about bulking up.
I understand your point..but some of them don't care about the beer gut..they just want to lift crazy weights. Have you ever seen the crazy olympic lifters who look like they eat 3000 burgers a day but manage to lift huge amount of weight? My question is, is having a "belly" or looking fat on the outside an immediate sign of bad health?
 

Aynsl156

10+ Year Member
Apr 1, 2007
632
1
Status
Medical Student
Being able to pick up large rocks does not make you healthy. The added muscle mass is somewhat protective, but hauling around a bunch of fat is setting them up for lipid problems, insulin resistance problems, cardiovascular problems, etc. Adipose tissue isn't just a cushiony fuel storage reservoir, it's metabolic and endocrine organ that affects all the systems of the body. When you add in the fact that these guys are likely eating the crappiest possible diets (check out the cholesterol per serving of whey protein sometime y'all), they really aren't making themselves healthier than, for instance, the guy who runs on the treadmill or elliptical or swims or bikes for the same amount of time each day.
Bingo!
 

Aynsl156

10+ Year Member
Apr 1, 2007
632
1
Status
Medical Student
You've been reading Michael Pollan, eh? Love his stuff.
 
About the Ads