Whyamionhere

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This is so neurotic so I apologize but is it looked down upon to ask if it is possible to leave your interview day around a half hour early to catch a flight? Particularly if it's a school across the country from you.

It seems like schools are understanding, but has anyone heard that they might feel like you don't give a crap about their school if you have to leave a little early? Yeah I know this question might be ridiculous.

Also, I would let them know by email far in advance, not like tell them the day of "oh hey I'm leaving now peace out".

Thanks so much.
 

ridethecliche

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Depends on what they have scheduled then. If it's part of the planned program, you should plan to be there the entire time.

Pay the extra 50-100 bucks for a later flight.
 
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ndafife

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I'm not sure the exact breakdown of the day, so I'll just pay that extra $$$$$, not worth a big REJECT
Either way, whether it is something important or not. The people in charge of admissions planned out a day for you and all the other interviewees. Not sticking around for the whole thing looks like you don't really care.
 
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Goro

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ridethecliche

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That's ridiculous. Some people actually have a legit reason to want to leave early: family obligations, work obligations, etc. I had to take stupid transport methods (aka long ass train/bus/car rides) to save money and took things back at stupid hours so I didn't lose vacation days so I could go to other interviews.

There's a difference between showing up to your interview and then peacing right away, but if you legit have places to be admissions isn't awful about it if you explain the situation. Maybe they're stuck up, but in that case I wouldn't want to be at that institution anyway if that's the culture they have.
 
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Goro

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It says a lot about a candidate who, on perhaps the most important interview day of their life, wouldn't make the effort to devote their full time to the day.

As to your bolded comment, pretty easy to say when you're already in med school.

There's a difference between showing up to your interview and then peacing right away, but if you legit have places to be admissions isn't awful about it if you explain the situation. Maybe they're stuck up, but in that case I wouldn't want to be at that institution anyway if that's the culture they have.
 
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Whyamionhere

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I am of course going to make the effort. I'm taking an extra day off work and paying much more for a flight so I can be there the entire time. There weren't a plethora of flights to choose from, and I wanted to try to be there the whole day, but I just asked a simple question just to see if it was even a usual situation, which clearly it is not. I'm not sure where in this thread I suddenly became some entitled, bratty and unappreciative candidate.

Anyways, can we let this thread pass on now? Thanks.
 
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walloobi

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I am of course going to make the effort. I'm taking an extra day off work and paying much more for a flight so I can be there the entire time. There weren't a plethora of flights to choose from, and I wanted to try to be there the whole day, but I just asked a simple question just to see if it was even a usual situation, which clearly it is not. I'm not sure where in this thread I suddenly became some entitled, bratty and unappreciative candidate.

Anyways, can we let this thread pass on now? Thanks.
Eh, some people get off on being condescending, even though you instantly took their advice and admitted to the flaw in your initial plan.
 

ridethecliche

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It says a lot about a candidate who, on perhaps the most important interview day of their life, wouldn't make the effort to devote their full time to the day.

As to your bolded comment, pretty easy to say when you're already in med school.
And my top choices were based a lot on what the culture of the school was like, in addition to the cost. I walked out of one of my interviews hating how I was treated. Pretty sure I wouldn't have gone there.
 

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I left a couple interview days early, not before my interviews were done of course but before a tour or extra talk etc. Didn't seem to have any effect. I needed to catch the last flight of the day because I had a job and needed to be there the next day.
 
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Another example of how SDN exaggerates.

Should you try and schedule another flight, yes. If God forbid you can't and explain it to the admissions committee sincerely and they okay it, I don't see a problem. In one of my interviews they asked us at the beginning of the day if anyone needed to leave by a certain time to catch flights, buses, etc.

Does it suck having to leave early and should you avoid that? of course. But if you have a great interview, the entire day goes well, and you already recieved an okay from admissions to leave 30 mins early to catch a flight, I can't imagine that resulting in a rejection.

Just calm down everyone. Calm down.
 

Matthew9Thirtyfive

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Not sure how having to leave early to catch a flight because you have obligations makes someone entitled. If it's just because you don't want to pay for a later flight (and can afford it), AND you feel like they shouldn't give you **** for it, then I can understand. But that doesn't seem to be the case.
 

ridethecliche

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Good luck with residency.
You realize places have different culture right? And not all of them add more crap to their day than the hours and lifestyle already dictate.

But okay. You're going to bring a quip about residency in when we're talking about med school interviews. kewl.

Edit: Comparing the process for getting into med school and residency is asinine. Residency interviews are basically job interviews. There's really no comparison. Oh and there's that little match thing too.
 
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FutureOncologist

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You realize places have different culture right? And not all of them add more crap to their day than the hours and lifestyle already dictate.

But okay. You're going to bring a quip about residency in when we're talking about med school interviews. kewl.

Edit: Comparing the process for getting into med school and residency is asinine. Residency interviews are basically job interviews. There's really no comparison. Oh and there's that little match thing too.
What I was trying to drive home is, unless you're being discriminated against in any way during the med school interview, not every interviewer is going to hold your hand and ask you "so why do you like medicine sweetheart?" Some are going to be harsh. JHU rode me hard because of my low sGPA. Another school, in which I was accepted, grilled me on more than that. They questioned just about everything. So I wouldn't be surprised if an adcom treats interviewees that way.

I said "residency," not "residency interviews." Yeah, it's pretty much a job interview. I know that. But during residency, especially 1st year/internship, you're at the bottom of the totem pole. You'll be mistreated a lot by the hospital, attendings, and patients. Occasionally, the nurse who's been there "way longer than you" too. The administration of the hospital won't care about you or your patients, only about his/her pockets. Want a patient to stay overnight pro bono in the ER? Too bad, either treat the emergent issues and kick him out or somehow find the erroneous amount of money s/he needs to pay for the bed and the room.

Patients, no matter what, will hear what they wanna hear. Give them anything else? They'll ask for another doctor or just leave you all together (and I mean this in a general sense, not something like the flu or sinus infection.) Oh yeah, if you're 26 by the time you graduate, and if you work in a big hospital seeing a lot of older patients, get used to being called "young," "medical student," or "not a real doctor." It happens, and it won't stop until you bald or your skin wrinkles. Attendings want things their way, done in the manner they want, or else you're dead weight. They teach you how they were taught and some won't accept another way to do it.

But I guess n=1. Another point I was trying to drive home is: you don't get to walk out like that in the real world just because someone was harsh. I constantly get yelled at, even if I was right. Nature of the game.
 
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Matthew9Thirtyfive

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What I was trying to drive home is, unless you're being discriminated against in any way during the med school interview, not every interviewer is going to hold your hand and ask you "so why do you like medicine sweetheart?" Some are going to be harsh. JHU rode me hard because of my low sGPA. Another school, in which I was accepted, grilled me on more than that. They questions just about everything. So I wouldn't be surprised if an adcom treats interviewees that way.

I said "residency," not "residency interviews." Yeah, it's pretty much a job interview. I know that. But during residency, especially 1st year/internship, you're at the bottom of the totem pole. You'll be mistreated a lot by the hospital, attendings, and patients. Occasionally, the nurse who's been there "way longer than you" too. The administration of the hospital won't care about you or your patients, only about his/her pockets. Want a patient to stay overnight pro bono in the ER? Too bad, either treat the emergent issues and kick him out or somehow find the erroneous amount of money s/he needs to pay for the bed and the room.

Patients, no matter what, will hear what they wanna hear. Give them anything else? They'll ask for another doctor or just leave you all together (and I mean this in a general sense, not something like the flu or sinus infection.) Oh yeah, if you're 26 by the time you graduate, and if you work in a big hospital seeing a lot of older patients, get used to being called "young," "medical student," or "not a real doctor." It happens, and it wont' stop until you bald or your skin wrinkles. Attendings want things their way, done in the manner they want, or else you're dead weight. They teach you how they were taught and some won't accept another way to do it.

But I guess n=1. Another point I was trying to drive home is: you don't get to walk out like that in the real world just because someone was harsh. I constantly get yelled at, even if I was right. Nature of the game.
Another reason I support compulsory military service.
 
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Just completed an interview where the school was extremely accommodating for someone who needed to leave early (for a flight as well). Definitely can't hurt to see what their policy is on it.
 

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I'm always amazed with preallo's ability to turn an innocuous question into an extreme and merciless criticism. I realize this is a stressful time but what's wrong in answering simply and honestly without adding snide and condescension?

But OP, glad to hear you adjusted your plans. Good luck with your interviews! :luck::luck:
 

ridethecliche

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What I was trying to drive home is, unless you're being discriminated against in any way during the med school interview, not every interviewer is going to hold your hand and ask you "so why do you like medicine sweetheart?" Some are going to be harsh. JHU rode me hard because of my low sGPA. Another school, in which I was accepted, grilled me on more than that. They questioned just about everything. So I wouldn't be surprised if an adcom treats interviewees that way.

I said "residency," not "residency interviews." Yeah, it's pretty much a job interview. I know that. But during residency, especially 1st year/internship, you're at the bottom of the totem pole. You'll be mistreated a lot by the hospital, attendings, and patients. Occasionally, the nurse who's been there "way longer than you" too. The administration of the hospital won't care about you or your patients, only about his/her pockets. Want a patient to stay overnight pro bono in the ER? Too bad, either treat the emergent issues and kick him out or somehow find the erroneous amount of money s/he needs to pay for the bed and the room.

Patients, no matter what, will hear what they wanna hear. Give them anything else? They'll ask for another doctor or just leave you all together (and I mean this in a general sense, not something like the flu or sinus infection.) Oh yeah, if you're 26 by the time you graduate, and if you work in a big hospital seeing a lot of older patients, get used to being called "young," "medical student," or "not a real doctor." It happens, and it won't stop until you bald or your skin wrinkles. Attendings want things their way, done in the manner they want, or else you're dead weight. They teach you how they were taught and some won't accept another way to do it.

But I guess n=1. Another point I was trying to drive home is: you don't get to walk out like that in the real world just because someone was harsh. I constantly get yelled at, even if I was right. Nature of the game.
You're still comparing apples and oranges. I had the luxury of choice when I made my decision and based it on a variety of factors.

If the only school I'd gotten into was the one where the interviewer was a dick, I would have gone. So goes life.

Intern year and residency are well known for being hellish at times. I've worked in a hospital long enough to know whose ass I have to kiss and who can save my ass when I'm in need. The general principle of not being a dick is again accurate. That really bad interview I had was an awesome learning experience and did prepare me better for future ones. Plus, I missed a snowstorm back home and got to chill on the beach instead. It all worked out.

Another reason I support compulsory military service.
So much for any concept of 'freedom'.
 

Matthew9Thirtyfive

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So much for any concept of 'freedom'.
Honestly, I'd be okay with any sort of public service. And if you think compulsory service would take away your freedoms, well it might for the one or two years you'd serve. But I can tell you from experience that it would make you appreciate them much more when you're done and give you great perspective (you in general, not you specifically).
 
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ridethecliche

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Honestly, I'd be okay with any sort of public service. And if you think compulsory service would take away your freedoms, well it might for the one or two years you'd serve. But I can tell you from experience that it would make you appreciate them much more when you're done and give you great perspective (you in general, not you specifically).
In our society, as it's currently set up, I do think it would take away freedoms. Whether one appreciates it or not is totally different. We definitely don't do enough for the average citizen to require them to put in 1-2 years of their life of service.

I fully support programs like city year and others that help students pay off debt etc in exchange for service. The luxury of being an American citizen is accompanied by the right to make such choices by yourself. Countries that have service requirements like the ones you're suggesting have vastly different social support programs.
 

Matthew9Thirtyfive

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In our society, as it's currently set up, I do think it would take away freedoms. Whether one appreciates it or not is totally different. We definitely don't do enough for the average citizen to require them to put in 1-2 years of their life of service.
Obviously not going to assume anything about you, but simply speaking from the perspective of someone who has been places where freedom is an abstract concept experienced only by some, I disagree.

I fully support programs like city year and others that help students pay off debt etc in exchange for service. The luxury of being an American citizen is accompanied by the right to make such choices by yourself. Countries that have service requirements like the ones you're suggesting have vastly different social support programs.
Part of what drew me to the military was the opportunity to do things others can't or do want to, as naive as that may sound. So I'm proud to be part of an all volunteer force. I just think public service (of any kind, really) would do a lot for this country. I've seen what it can do for people, myself included.
 

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Obviously not going to assume anything about you, but simply speaking from the perspective of someone who has been places where freedom is an abstract concept experienced only by some, I disagree.

Part of what drew me to the military was the opportunity to do things others can't or do want to, as naive as that may sound. So I'm proud to be part of an all volunteer force. I just think public service (of any kind, really) would do a lot for this country. I've seen what it can do for people, myself included.
As a former military person myself, I never agreed with the draft or compulsory military service. I don't want to serve with soldiers or other personnel who don't want to be there.
 
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tvb

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Most of mine asked at the beginning of the day if anyone had a flight to catch or any time constraints and seemed to be pretty cool about it.
 

ridethecliche

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Obviously not going to assume anything about you, but simply speaking from the perspective of someone who has been places where freedom is an abstract concept experienced only by some, I disagree.

Part of what drew me to the military was the opportunity to do things others can't or do want to, as naive as that may sound. So I'm proud to be part of an all volunteer force. I just think public service (of any kind, really) would do a lot for this country. I've seen what it can do for people, myself included.
I immigrated here. The american export of freedom is idealistic and narcissistic at best and disastrous at worst. We haven't really had a just war since WWII, perhaps Korea excepted.

I have family and friends that serve or have served.

And yeah, I guess shooting at people is something most civilians can't do, but then again this is America so plenty have done it with few repercussions.

I'm being pretty flippant here, but I completely agree with what xxfan said. I can't imagine placing people that are dead serious about the military alongside those that are doing it because they couldn't figure out how to dodge the requirement. It's a recipe for disaster and it selects for the poor.

Anyway, this is wicked off topic now so I'm going to digress...
 

Matthew9Thirtyfive

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I immigrated here. The american export of freedom is idealistic and narcissistic at best and disastrous at worst. We haven't really had a just war since WWII, perhaps Korea excepted.

I have family and friends that serve or have served.

And yeah, I guess shooting at people is something most civilians can't do, but then again this is America so plenty have done it with few repercussions.

I'm being pretty flippant here, but I completely agree with what xxfan said. I can't imagine placing people that are dead serious about the military alongside those that are doing it because they couldn't figure out how to dodge the requirement. It's a recipe for disaster and it selects for the poor.

Anyway, this is wicked off topic now so I'm going to digress...
Not going to argue politics, but your ridiculous oversimplification of the military is insulting. I have been in the military for 5 years, and while I carry a gun a few times a week and have been on boardings, I have yet to kill anyone (nor do I want to).

I have, however, rescued a lone boater floating in a raft whose small boat sank a few days prior. I've fished the bodies of dead Marines out of the ocean so their families could bury them. Took part in a humanitarian mission to deliver supplies after the tsunami in Japan. Protected unarmed shipping vessels from pirates. Many other things.

To do that stuff, I missed most of my oldest daughter's first year of life. I left 4 days after my wedding and almost didn't come home because of an explosion that almost took out our whole ship. I've moved my family 6 times in 5 years. Pulled my wife away from a job she loves to an island where she knew no one a month before she was due with our second daughter.

Both of the commands I've been to (not to mention the training commands) are full of people who have done more to help Americans and anyone else who needed it than to kill or harm anyone.

So, I apologize if I don't find your flippant response amusing. I also apologize for continuing to derail the thread. I'll just unsubscribe from it.
 
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Frogger27

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Not going to argue politics, but your ridiculous oversimplification of the military is insulting. I have been in the military for 5 years, and while I carry a gun a few times a week and have been on boardings, I have yet to kill anyone (nor do I want to).

I have, however, rescued a lone boater floating in a raft whose small boat sank a few days prior. I've fished the bodies of dead Marines out of the ocean so their families could bury them. Took part in a humanitarian mission to deliver supplies after the tsunami in Japan. Protected unarmed shipping vessels from pirates. Many other things.

To do that stuff, I missed most of my oldest daughter's first year of life. I left 4 days after my wedding and almost didn't come home because of an explosion that almost took out our whole ship. I've moved my family 6 times in 5 years. Pulled my wife away from a job she loves to an island where she knew no one a month before she was due with our second daughter.

Both of the commands I've been to (not to mention the training commands) are full of people who have done more to help Americans and anyone else who needed it than to kill or harm anyone.

So, I apologize if I don't find your flippant response amusing. I also apologize for continuing to derail the thread. I'll just unsubscribe from it.
you're the man, thank you for your sacrifice to this country.
 
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ridethecliche

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Not going to argue politics, but your ridiculous oversimplification of the military is insulting. I have been in the military for 5 years, and while I carry a gun a few times a week and have been on boardings, I have yet to kill anyone (nor do I want to).

I have, however, rescued a lone boater floating in a raft whose small boat sank a few days prior. I've fished the bodies of dead Marines out of the ocean so their families could bury them. Took part in a humanitarian mission to deliver supplies after the tsunami in Japan. Protected unarmed shipping vessels from pirates. Many other things.

To do that stuff, I missed most of my oldest daughter's first year of life. I left 4 days after my wedding and almost didn't come home because of an explosion that almost took out our whole ship. I've moved my family 6 times in 5 years. Pulled my wife away from a job she loves to an island where she knew no one a month before she was due with our second daughter.

Both of the commands I've been to (not to mention the training commands) are full of people who have done more to help Americans and anyone else who needed it than to kill or harm anyone.

So, I apologize if I don't find your flippant response amusing. I also apologize for continuing to derail the thread. I'll just unsubscribe from it.
Like I said, agree to disagree. My issue is much more with the use of the military than those that serve in it. They are two totally different arguments, even though they're somewhat related at times. You made your choice and you should let others do the same. Just because the human spirit/experience lets us learn and grow from all experiences, doesn't mean that others should be forced into it.

For every example you gave, there exist tons of counter examples of innocent families and civilians, hell, even american soldiers, that died for no good reason.

You made your choice and are living with the consequences. That said, your experience seems to have steeled your will and given you more perspective than many can hope to have. It'll serve you well in your medical career. Good luck!