Hawaii RxP Bil Easily Passess All Committees: Move to Senate

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positivepsych

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Two major limitations:

(7) Is employed or contracted by, and will practice the prescribing authority at:
(A) A federally qualified health center established under title 42 United States Code section 1396;
(B) A licensed health clinic located in a federally designated medically underserved area as defined by title 42 Code of Federal Regulations part 62; or
(C) A licensed health clinic located in a mental health professional shortage area; and

§465-G Exclusionary formulary list.
(1) All narcotics;
(2) All monoamine oxidase inhibitors;
(3) All anti-psychotic medications;
(4) All amphetamines;
(5) All non-psychotropic medications;
(6) Lithium; and
(7) Serzone.

Meaning no private practice, & no treatment of ADHD, Schizophrenia, and Bipolar. I think the exclusionary formulary is fair, but the limitations on where you can work is less so.
 

edieb

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it is meant as a foot-in-the-door
 

docjohng

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I can't help but laugh a little at this list of exclusions... looks like you'd be able to prescribe antidepressants, and that's about it.
 

Hernandez

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I'm not trying to troll, I legitimately have no clue.

What type of training do Psy.D./Ph.D.s get on pharmacology or physiology? and do these bills have any requirements for such training before you obtain prescription rights?
 

Therapist4Chnge

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To keep this thread on track (and answer your question, which seems legitimate), do a search for "RxP Training" and similar words...and you should come up with a plethora of threads. It varies by program, and I think it still needs some work, but at the reputable places...it is quite a bit more than most people realize.

-t
 

heimlichboy

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malpractice
I was just in louisiana which is one of the states that lets psychologists prescribe meds. But this has not had much of an impact because guess what the psychologists cannot find any insurance company that will cover their malpractice if they prescribe meds. It is a bit of a liability. So just because you have the right to prescribe does not mean that you will
 

doctorpsych

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malpractice
I was just in louisiana which is one of the states that lets psychologists prescribe meds. But this has not had much of an impact because guess what the psychologists cannot find any insurance company that will cover their malpractice if they prescribe meds. It is a bit of a liability. So just because you have the right to prescribe does not mean that you will

Hboy, don't need to post your same comment on multiple threads... stop your sad attempts to scare psychologist's interested in rxp.. as noted by psici, apa's insurance covers rxp for psychologist... also, when I renewed my own insurace through another national carrier not too long ago, I asked them about rxp in LA and NM and its effect on the rates... the insurace told me that there was no plan on increasing the rates and that there were many factors involved in the assessment of the premius... not just rxp.
 
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