Fedxup

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I looked at a few schools and none of them have health-law courses taught as a part of medical education. Maybe I am wrong and it is taught under a different course name. I think teaching about the health laws (relating to doctors) should be taught in med school. Or should I assume we learn this during our last 2 years of med school as part of the clinical experience? But what if someone wants to go into private practice? Do med students really know that if they are signed up with medicare they can't see any patient for free? Just a thought that came to my head.
 
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Some school have business of healthcare courses during the first two years, but most of the law stuff will come in years 3 & 4 and generally specific to the state your school is in.
 

vc7777

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...Do med students really know that if they are signed up with medicare they can't see any patient for free? Just a thought that came to my head.
First, several basic legal issues are often covered in medical ethics or humanities courses during your schooling. There are many further opportunities in residency and beyond to cover such topics.

Second, I'll preemptively warn that SDN is not the place to offer or solicit legal advice and speculation should be kept to a minimum, please. Healthcare law is an entire branch legal practice that many veteran lawyers have no or minimal exposure to. As such - how can you expect a physician to understand the finer details? And in law (much like medicine) the devil is in the details.

I've said before and I'll say it again that I take issue with lawyer-bashing: doctors who think they are better than lawyers are the ones who get into trouble. Yes-just like bad physicians there are some bad lawyers, no doubt. But no medical school course will ever replace getting good counsel.

Finally, I just want to throw out there that your statement (and likely the doctor who told you this had a reason to tell you this) is misleading at best.
 
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Fedxup

Fedxup

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First, several basic legal issues are often covered in medical ethics or humanities courses during your schooling. There are many further opportunities in residency and beyond to cover such topics.

Second, I'll preemptively warn that SDN is not the place to offer or solicit legal advice and speculation should be kept to a minimum, please. Healthcare law is an entire branch legal practice that many veteran lawyers have no or minimal exposure to. As such - how can you expect a physician to understand the finer details? And in law (much like medicine) the devil is in the details.

I've said before and I'll say it again that I take issue with lawyer-bashing: doctors who think they are better than lawyers are the ones who get into trouble. Yes-just like bad physicians there are some bad lawyers, no doubt. But no medical school course will ever replace getting good counsel.

Finally, I just want to throw out there that your statement (and likely the doctor who told you this had a reason to tell you this) is misleading at best.
I am bashing lawyers or doctors. I was simply just asking if Medical Schools equip their students with basic knowledge of few laws. I don't expect my physician or any physician to be rehearsed in healthcare law. That should be left up to lawyers because that's there job. Just like I wouldn't want a lawyer prescribing me medicine, I don't expect a physician to be fully aware of ever law. That was not my point at all. Sorry if it came out like that.

"We give discounts to teachers and preachers, and anybody who comes in wearing spurs gets $5 off," said Juliette Madrigal-Dersch, a pediatrician and internist in Marble Falls, Texas. She says she also treats patients who develop cancer free of charge. "I couldn't do that if I took Medicare. It's considered an illegal enticement."

I am not expert so I Have no idea how accurate the above is. But I still think some basics should be taught about healthcare law in med school. You should be taught on the level that you were taught BIO 101 in UG and leave Anatomy 800 to lawyers.
 

vc7777

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I am bashing lawyers or doctors. I was simply just asking if Medical Schools equip their students with basic knowledge of few laws. I don't expect my physician or any physician to be rehearsed in healthcare law. That should be left up to lawyers because that's there job. Just like I wouldn't want a lawyer prescribing me medicine, I don't expect a physician to be fully aware of ever law. That was not my point at all. Sorry if it came out like that.

"We give discounts to teachers and preachers, and anybody who comes in wearing spurs gets $5 off," said Juliette Madrigal-Dersch , a pediatrician and internist in Marble Falls, Texas. She says she also treats patients who develop cancer free of charge. "I couldn't do that if I took Medicare. It's considered an illegal enticement."

I am not expert so I Have no idea how accurate the above is. But I still think some basics should be taught about healthcare law in med school. You should be taught on the level that you were taught BIO 101 in UG and leave Anatomy 800 to lawyers.
NO my bad...you didn't bash lawyers...I was anticipating lawyer bashing to come and posted in haste - so I apologize for my terse response implying you did.

However, physicians can be some of the most politically motivated people out there and you need to be critical in reviewing their statements-especially on healthcare, healthcare reform, etc. Taking a sound bite from some news article as legal opinion is, well, folly!

Again, what was said is partially true and I don't know who she is but it is likely political fodder.

But back to your question and my response: you will get some exposure - hopeful enough to tell you when you are (legally) in over your head - but that's about it.
 
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Fedxup

Fedxup

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NO my bad...you didn't bash lawyers...I was anticipating lawyer bashing to come and posted in haste - so I apologize for my terse response implying you did.

However, physicians can be some of the most politically motivated people out there and you need to be critical in reviewing their statements-especially on healthcare, healthcare reform, etc. Taking a sound bite from some news article as legal opinion is, well, folly!

Again, what was said is partially true and I don't know who she is but it is likely political fodder.

But back to your question and my response: you will get some exposure - hopeful enough to tell you when you are (legally) in over your head - but that's about it.
No need to apologize. I can see where your response would stem from haha.

I guess you can say she is politically motivated. I was just taking an example. I would hope that just from exposure of different case you would be able to form a sense of what is legal and what isn't. Thank you for your thoughts.
 

LizzyM

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At my school there is a "bootcamp" for senior residents to provide them with the information they need to go into practice.... Solo practice is becoming very rare in America; you can expect to be employed coming out of residency/fellowship and your employer will tell you what you can/can't do with regard to billing.

Some legal/ethical stuff is covered in medical school but not under its own banner; you can expect it to be woven into coursework on professionalism, medical ethics and so forth.
 

SouthernSurgeon

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The reality is that medical schools in general do a woefully poor job educating med students about the following:

1. Healthcare/malpractice law
2. Healthcare policy
3. Healthcare and personal finance