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Health Professions Scholarship

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by Cameron, Nov 8, 1999.

  1. Cameron

    Cameron Senior Member
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    I have some questions concerning the Health Professions Scholarships offered by the Air Force/Army/Navy. I know a bit about the program but am looking for people who have first hand experience with the program.
    Some of the questions I have are:

    How much control does the military have over your selection of residency/specialty, if any?

    What do you wish you'd known before signing the contract?

    Some other, less difficult questions are:
    When would I need to apply? What are the deadlines (I'd be applying next summer).

    I know this topic has been discussed here before, but I still have questions and would appreciate your comments. Thanks.

    - Cameron
     
  2. Roderick

    Roderick New Member

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    The military doesn't have any say in what specialty you go into beyond the selection board that does the "match" for military residencies. You need to realize, however, that failing to match doesn't mean you'll necessarily be turned loose to do a civilian residency. The number of those slots has gone down in recent years with the reduction in how many scholarships are given out. If you're interested in a particularly competitive specialty you should plan on having to do a utilization tour as a GMO, flight surgeon, or undersea medical officer (navy only). You won't be forced into a specialty you don't want but you may have to accept that with some competitive specialties, you may never get selected.

    If you want to avoid surprises, do your own research about the branch you want to get accepted by- where their bases are, where their hospitals are, training opportunities, what types of operational platforms they have. The recruiters will not give you the full story because they have a job to bring live bodies into the program. If you just listen to the recruiter, you're setting yourself up for disappointment later.

    To find out how to apply, call an officer programs recruiter.
     
  3. Cameron

    Cameron Senior Member
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    Do you know how military residencies compare to civilian ones? I fear that I'll be closing the door to some good opportunities if all I can choose from are military residencies. However, I imagine there are training opportunities that military residencies can provide that aren't available elsewhere -- it can go both ways.
    Does the match process for the military residencies pretty much resemeble the normal residency matching?
    Do you have any recommendations as to where I could begin my research to find out some of the things you mentioned? I agree that the recruiters are only moderately helpful -- they're good salesmen. [​IMG]

    Does anyone on the board know some of the major differences between the Army/Air Force/Navy medical programs? From what I've heard, I'm more likely to be assigned somewhere where my family can't come along if I'm in the Navy (I guess some Naval bases don't accomidate families of the officers?).

    Sorry for all of the questions - it's just hard to find answers to some of these questions. Everyone points me to the recruiters and, as has been mentioned, they're not the most objective source of information.

    [This message has been edited by Cameron (edited 11-11-1999).]
     
  4. strive

    strive Junior Member
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    I am currently applying for HPSP scholarships. The best advice I can give is that you request the recruiter put you in contact with current, active duty physicians in the military who can give you a realistic perspective. As in everything else in your past experiences, nothing is really free. There are certain sacrifices that you must accept if you are chosen and accept an HPSP scholarship. In my case, I am very willing to become a military officer and I look forward to those challenges along with those of being a physician.
    I have freinds who are physicians in the military and the most common response they have when answering questions re:HPSP is that you should NOT choose this if you are only interested in the money. Overall, they are happy with their experiences but remember, you are an officer in the military and that does become an important factor in the next 10 years of your life.
    Regarding the differences between the programs, they are not really all that subsantial. I am choosing Army for a few reasons. They pay the entire tuition and fees no matter what the cost of the school.(There are some limitations with the other services, but not that substantial.) They offer more residency slots each year for specialties that I am interested in. (Very important in my opion. You definitely want to do your residency in the military if possible.)I have family currently serving as officers in the Army. Finally, since I am married I dislike the possibility of a billet at sea if I am in the Navy. (Yes, I realize that there are unaccompanied tours in the Army)
    Finally, remember that the recruiter has a mission to recruit qualified applicants. However, I have had a good experience so far and have found my recruiter to be very willing to research information for me and he has passed me up the chain of command when he has been unable to satisfy me with his answers.
     
  5. doatc

    doatc Senior Member
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