M

mas810

Hi,
I was wondering where everyone applied to for their phd in clinical health psychology or clinical psychology with a specialization in health psychology. I'm most interested in this area and I need a wider geographic area to apply to then just Philadelphia and NY.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
 

bmedclinic

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I'm entering the Clinical Health Psychology specialty at University of Kansas and it looks like an amazing program. I also have a friend at University of Missouri at Kansas City in health emphasis.
KU's is indeed very good, from what I have heard.
Also I've heard of UMKC's as well.
Here are some that I was looking at, eons ago
Florida
ETSU
UNT
ASU
UNC charoltte
UMKC
UAB
Alabama
VCU
Kent State
KU
BGSU
Iowa
Whichita State
Louisville
Syracuse
Cincinatti
Detroit Mercy
Jackson State
Missouri St Lous
UNLV
Nevada Reno
K state
UND
Miami (OH)
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee


The above list is one I made back in the day and I'm into bmed/sleep/clinical health/anxiety so not all these are a perfect fit for you, but many are worth looking into.
 

krisrox

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Georgia State and Loyola Chicago have faculty researching health psych, but not official tracks.
 

PsychPhDStudent

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programs that come to mind:

university of florida
ohio state university
university of miami
university of kansas
 
Nov 28, 2009
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programs that come to mind:

university of florida
ohio state university
university of miami
university of kansas

Some of these were mentioned above.

Also check out Health Psychology website (APA Div. 38):

I think most, or all, of these offer a health track; this isn't an exhaustive list:

Univ. of Pittsburgh
Univ. of Miami
SDSU/UCSD (you can also get an MPH)
Ohio State
Drexel
UConn
Univ. of Hawaii (you can do a dual-specialty in health)
BGSU (I think)
Arizona State (??)
Univ. of FL
Univ. of Illinois - Chicago
Univ. of Maryland - Baltimore County
Rutgers Univ.
SUNY-Albany
 
Nov 28, 2009
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also,

IUPUI
Yale
Univ. of South FL
Syracuse Univ.


Some of these were mentioned above.

Also check out Health Psychology website (APA Div. 38):

I think most, or all, of these offer a health track; this isn't an exhaustive list:

Univ. of Pittsburgh
Univ. of Miami
SDSU/UCSD (you can also get an MPH)
Ohio State
Drexel
UConn
Univ. of Hawaii (you can do a dual-specialty in health)
BGSU (I think)
Arizona State (??)
Univ. of FL
Univ. of Illinois - Chicago
Univ. of Maryland - Baltimore County
Rutgers Univ.
SUNY-Albany
 

Enlightened1

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Deleted.
 
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PsychBoxe

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My PsyD program has certain courses that are emphasized for a occupation focus in health psychology. What specific jobs will PsyD's have in the realm of health psychology. I have been researching some options, but would like to know the insight that others have.
 

PsychScience

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My PsyD program has certain courses that are emphasized for a occupation focus in health psychology. What specific jobs will PsyD's have in the realm of health psychology. I have been researching some options, but would like to know the insight that others have.
Some strong programs not mentioned

Clinical Ph.D:
Eastern Michigan (profs that study psych)
Wayne State (Well developed Health minor)
Vanderbilt
 

researchgirl

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these may or may not have formal health tracks, but they all have multiple faculty members doing health psych research

duke
temple
pitt
university of florida
university of south florida
university of miami (fl)
ohio state
ucsd/sdsu
rhode island
uconn
yale
usc (california)
 
Jan 28, 2010
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for the most part, everyone has mentioned the programs I applied to. That Guide to Clinical Programs book everyone uses is extremely helpful. They have a section on the research topics someone in the faculty is working on that I found quite helpful. My main research interest is substance abuse in HIV+ individuals (particularly smoking), so I made an excel sheet of all the schools that had someone working on either of those topics. I found approximately 30 schools. I went to their psyc pages and looked up professors working on those projects. Narrowed it down to about 16 programs in terms of fit and location and applied to 11. And fortunately for me, I'll be starting at UMKC working with HIV+ smokers. :)

If you know what your interest in health psychology is specifically, it will be generally easy to narrow down your list of schools. Never thought I'd end up in the midwest, but it was the best fit for me, so that program book really helps. Health Psychology is becoming a pretty sexy field so you're going in at a good time, but I think you really have to know what you want to work in specifically.

Good luck in your search. I can answer any questions you might have about some programs because I do still have the list of the ones I initially looked at.
 
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does anyone have a little more information on what people who chose a health psych track/concentration do with that? i have interests in the treatment and prevention of eating disorders, and i'm wondering if taking a health psych track at the program im entering in the fall would be useful. any thoughts?? how would a health psych concentration fit into my interests? do health psychologists do psychotherapy?
 
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does anyone have a little more information on what people who chose a health psych track/concentration do with that? i have strong interests in the treatment and prevention of eating disorders (AN, BN, BED, and also obesity--altho that's obviously not a disorder :)), and i'm wondering if taking a health psych track at the program im entering in the fall would be useful. any thoughts?? how would a health psych concentration fit into my interests? i also should mention my goals are primarily in clinical work/psychotherapy, but i do have research interests as well (i'm going to a psyd program). do health psychologists do psychotherapy?

Although I'm for the most part 80-20 research/clinical, I can tell you that there is quite a bit you can do. As an example, while I was in Houston, I worked in the behavioral science department at one of the cancer centers there and worked with a number of psychologists who focused on health issues (mainly treatment adherence) in cancer patients. Because the place I worked at was a research school, all psychologists there did research so I'm not sure if you'd be interested in any of that. Body image issues were of big concern and we had a great psychologist there that focused on that. I worked on treatment utilization for smoking cessation treatments in HIV+ patients. Our treatment was MI based so there was a nice balance of psychotherapy and research there.

I know from my own experience at this lab and being a smoking cessation counselor in the lab I'm currently in, weight gain is a concern that comes up a lot with women in particular. You get to see how various health issues affect health behaviors and how you need to address them all in order to promote healthy behavior. If a cancer patient smokes, are they more likely to have practice unhealthy behaviors. Will they have a poor diet, will they have trouble adhering to their cancer treatment regimen? Do they have any psychosocial problems? Do they have a poorer quality of life. Does their poor eating behavior, smoking, etc, decrease the effectiveness of their treatment? How do you treat? If you implement a treatment program that focuses on adhering to their cancer treatment, will those that succeed also be more likely to quit smoking, eat healthier? Lots of fun questions to answer.

So at the end of the day, if it's something of interest to you, I wouldn't see the harm in doing it. Would this require any additional work on your part other than the obvious increase in classes needed, etc? Would this keep you from doing something else?

I'm not aware of a 'health psychologist' doing just therapy, but one of the things I would mention is that even if you do go into private practice, you might run into issues regarding a person's healthy behaviors and their quality of life. If it's being offered by your program and the costs are minimal (a few extra classes) why not?

Sorry for ranting... I'm really not motivated to do any work today. :)
 

Therapist4Chnge

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"Health Psychology" is an umbrella term that can apply to many different settings. Generally a health psychologist engages in work (therapy, research, assessment, etc) that focuses on a condition/issue (DM, smoking, HIV) with a goal of education about the condition/improvement of the condition /management of the condition/etc. That probably wasn't the clearest definition, but I was trying to do it in one sentence.

I know HPs that do mostly research and education/training around a specific condition (Type-II Diabetes for example), while other HPs may do assessments related to medical procedures (gastric by-pass, organ transplant, etc).

Someone mentioned eating disorders, which is one area where there is a lot of clinical work. I've formerly worked in the area, and it can be very challenging work, but incredibly interesting. There are definitely opportunities for clinical work in the area, though there is more and more competition with MA/MS level practitioners.

There is quite a learning curve working with EDs, moreso than I have found with most other Dx's. I would strongly recommend receiving solid generalist training and experience before dipping your toe in that pond, because I have yet to see a case that didn't have multiple other co-morbid things going on.
 
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thanks!! texas--i appreciate your thoughts. i guess the extra classes couldnt hurt, as you said! it might be helpful to inform the work i hope to do. something to think about :)

so i get the feel that health psychologists work in medical settings/hospitals most often?
 
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Pragma

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Most people I know who did formal health psych training ended up working in AMCs doing something specific clinically (e.g., organ transplant evals, gastric bypass assessment, etc). However, you can do a lot of other things and I know there are some folks doing more community work or research.
 
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Kent State has a health track for their clinical program and also a separate health psychology program.

Also, if you are interested in medical psych (which I think overlaps with health), UA-Birmingham has a good clinical program.
 

paramour

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Hi...:)
Health psychology is concerned with understanding how biological, psychological, environmental, and cultural factors are involved in physical health and illness. Health psychologists work alongside other medical professionals in clinical settings, work on behavior change in public health promotion, teach at universities, and conduct research. Although its early beginnings can be traced to the kindred field of clinical psychology, four different divisions within health psychology and one allied field have developed over time. The four divisions include clinical health psychology, public health psychology, community health psychology, and critical health psychology.
Hi...

Link.

Are you just going to search the topic of the thread, cut and paste everything, without citations, without adding any additional words of your own (other than Hi...), regardless of whether the information you're posting is relevant to actually answering the OP's actual inquiry? On every single thread?

Just curious. :cool:
 
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You will hear a thousand and one story, but in the end, none of them really matters, if u don't appriciate the opportunity to exeperince some of your own predictions