HELLLPPPP!!!!

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by Scarlet, Apr 30, 2001.

  1. Scarlet

    Scarlet Junior Member

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    Hi everyone, here is yet another "what are my chances" question. I am currently about to graduate from college with a Premed/Psychology major and a Spanish & Biopsychology minor. Unfortunately, I'm afraid my GPA will not be any higher than a 3.0 at best. I REALLY desire to go to Osteopathic school but I am afraid I don't have a chance. I will be working as a nurse in the Army for four years and I plan on going to med school afterwards. If I make a decent grade on the MCAT, in your opinion, would I have a chance? Any suggestions? Thanks for you time! ;)
     
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  3. David511

    David511 Ponch's Illegitimate Son

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    Scarlet,

    The great thing about Osteopathic schools is that they tend to take a closer look at non-traditional students. The experience you will gain as an Army RN should garner the attention of the AdComs; what you need to do is back up that experience with the following:

    1) A decent performance on the MCAT. While a 27+ is competitive for DO school, if possible put the time studying for the test and kick some serious butt (i.e. 30+). Such a score will show the schools that you are able to master the information and will <hopefully> overshadow your 'sub-par' performance in school. It's normally beneficial to take the MCAT when you can still remember some of the info from your pre-med classes, however since you plan a 4-year stint in the military you will probably have to wait at least a year (since some schools only accept test results less than 3 years old).

    2) Make sure you really understand the tenets of the Osteopathic philosophy. A great (and relatively easy) way to do this is to read up on the subject. Norman Gevitz's book [The DO's; Osteopathic Medicine in America is a great start. You should also try and shadow as many DO's as possible, and obtain letters of recommendation as well. Not only will the first-hand experience you gain give you insight into the field, a good recommendation from a DO will go far with the AdComs.

    Hope this helps. Feel free to email me if you have any questions.
     
  4. Scarlet

    Scarlet Junior Member

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    Thank you David511 for the reply, it was very helpful. I have been researching Osteopathic schools for a little over a year now and really prefer their degree. I just hope I don't encounter much discrimination from ignorant individuals. Thanks for the encouragement. I plan on taking some classes to boost my GPA, and then we'll see what happens. By the way, are you from Boston? I'm from Boston myself and will be returning there in a few days. Thanks again! ;)
     
  5. David511

    David511 Ponch's Illegitimate Son

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    Scarlet,

    It sounds like you have your sh!t together, I have no doubt you'll be able to find success.

    As for your reference to discrimination and ignorance (in relation to the DO degree, I assume), its unfortunate but things are changing.

    Oh, and while I'm not originally from Boston (LA, actually), I have lived here for the last few years (and absolutely love the city). It's gonna be extremely hard to leave come August.

    Take care.
     

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