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Help an MD/PhD'er that is returning to the wards and remembers nada

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by ned, Nov 11, 2005.

  1. ned

    ned Member
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    Hi everyone,

    I'm an MD/PhD'er that's planning on returning to the wards shortly, and unfortunately, I remember only general concepts, no specifics.

    So I was wondering: Which review texts would you recommend??? I would like to especially avoid those texts that use alot of acronyms or assume a significant baseline of knowledge.

    Also since the classmates I will be joining know mostly Step one stuff, do you think I should review Step one stuff primarily, or should I focus on more M3 rotation-leaning books?

    These are the guys I was thinking of using:

    First Aid for Step One
    First Aid for the Wards
    Boards and Wards

    Any and all opions are welcome -- Thanks!!!
     
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  3. ears

    ears Senior Member
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    My advice as someone who went through that a couple of years ago (and I was in the lab a long time; almost certainly longer than you).
    1. You're going to be fine.
    2. Forget the Step 1 stuff; it doesn't matter. You can pick that up as you go along, and it's much more interesting this time.
    3. Your classmates are probably much less prepared than you are for the wards; you're already in the mode of "come to work every day, be prepared to do whatever is needed, and go home late." And that matters a lot more than which ribosomal subunit the quinolone antibiotics bind to.
    4. I wouldn't try to review everything at once. Instead, figure out what book you're going to read for each given rotation. (E.g., Lawrence for surgery, Blueprints in Ob/Gyn for Ob/Gyn, etc. Ask 3rd years, or search here.) Then, get ready for each rotation by trying to read that book a couple of weeks before the rotation. It can be hard to get going with each different field, but you can do it.
    5. The one thing from before I did need to review was H&Ps. I was just out of practice, so I refreshed my memory on all the possible history questions, and practiced my physical exam skills a couple of times.
    6. I don't know the books you describe above, but I do recommend Samir Desai's 101 Biggest Mistakes 3rd Year Medical Students Make And How To Avoid Them. The list of things to figure out on your first day alone is worth the price.
    7. But most importantly, relax; you're going to be fine.
     
  4. ned

    ned Member
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    Thanks very much for the advice. Anyone else want to weigh in? :)
     
  5. Uncus

    Uncus Junior Member
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    I'm in the same situation and have found the return from the lab pretty challenging. I remember all the general concepts and hear things that sound vaguely familiar but cannot recall any details from the first two years. For general internal medicine/family medicine knowledge I would recommend the "Step up to Medicine" book. It's a fairly new book and has more text than the blueprints and first aid for medicine books which I find useless for me. Step Up to medicine is a nice compromise between Cecil's Essentials and First Aid. Good luck.
     
  6. beary

    beary Pancytopenic
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    Hi ned,

    I came back to the wards after my Ph.D. a few months ago. I was very anxious about it as well but it really wasn't as bad as I feared. One thing I recommend is to be sure to tell your residents (and attendings and course director, depending on how much contact you have with them) your situation and that you are just coming back. Everyone helped me out a lot and I feel like I got caught up pretty quickly.
     
  7. PickyBicky

    PickyBicky Senior Member
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    I'll tell you what not to do. Don't brag about your research, how much more mature you are compared to the other M3s, how much you think your PhD is going to net you when it comes time to interview for residency, etc, etc.

    There are exceptions to every rule, but some of the re-entering MD/PhDs at my school were some of the nastiest, most arrogant, non-team players I had to work with. Be proud of what you've done and how far you've come, but resist the temptation to compensate for your clinical insecurities (which everyone entering their 3rd year will have) with being overbearing with just what a fantastic molecular biologist you are. Your new classmates will appreciate it greatly.

    -PB
     
  8. ears

    ears Senior Member
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    Oh, yeah, let me add a second to PB's advice: Don't be an ass.
     
  9. ned

    ned Member
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    Ummmm... yeah. I agree that there are lots of dual-degree bastards out there. You guys seem like you've been traumatized or something. :)

    So... anyone read the books I talked about?

    boards and wards
    first aid for the wards

    ???
     
  10. beary

    beary Pancytopenic
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    About "arrogant" MD/PhD students returning to the wards - I am sure this happens and obviously can't speak to your specific school. On the flip side, I cannot tell you how sick I am of hearing from classmates how it must have been so nice to have a "four year break."

    About the books you mentioned ned - I bought both of those but honestly never really used them. I would second what someone else on this thread said about just focusing on each specific rotation. Whatever you are going back on, try and refresh yourself a bit about that specific specialty and don't worry about the others until they come.

    Good luck! :luck:
     
  11. njbmd

    njbmd Guest
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    Hi there,
    Make sure that you remember how to do a good history and physical. Degowin's Diagnostic Examination is a good book to have around (easy and quick read). You do not need the Step I stuff. Figure out what books you are going to read for which rotation and ask your classmates for help with things that you do not remember. Offer to help them when things get overloaded. Be a team player and enjoy yourself.

    njbmd :)
     

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