picksix

2+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2016
33
3
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Pre-Dental
I've been lurking on these dental forums for a while now and the perception I am getting (again help me see the light if I am wrong) is that it is almost "A ok" for general dentists to encroach on the specialists scope of practice, but the moment a specialist want to practice some general dentistry (which they went through) by not falsely advertising then everyone gets upset and it's frowned upon...? I mean at least the specialist (you would argue maybe rusty) went through the education as a general dentist rather than taking CE courses (not very practical training I assume) to gain some kind of "specialization." Idk, I am not trying to offend any practicing professional but it just seems unfair that you would do things to people of your same profession that you would not want them to do to you. I know a man's/woman's gotta eat and has other mouths to feed...so please help me correct my confusion if there is one, may be apple to oranges, but to me it seems like one sacrificed 4-6yrs doing extra training so they should rightfully have the edge. If not then maybe general dentists shouldn't encroach in their scope.....no?
 

knife

10+ Year Member
Nov 17, 2008
121
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Houston, TX
www.instagram.com
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long story short.... yup
 

ktran17

7+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2011
1,196
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It's just the requirement of exclusive advertising rights of calling yourself a specialist in lieu of that, you forfeit your right to do GD which for almost all specialist would be far less profitable.

If you stopped advertising yourself as a specialist, nothing is stopping your from doing GD and doing advance cases you went to school for, like a prosthodontist practicing as a GP
 
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Awarara

2+ Year Member
May 9, 2016
84
54
It's because the GP has all the power. No one is going to refer to a specialist that can potentially take away patients. It's just how it is. If you want to be a specialist and do GP procedures, you better start finding your own patients.
 
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Jul 25, 2016
2
1
Elk Grove, CA
www.lagunavistadental.com
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Dentist
Unfortunately, that is how the professionals are regulated. In order to balance the business, specialists are now bound to focus on their specializations and those that did not will take care of the general services that people require. I believe it could be tough to be a specialist that they really need the focus to perfect their practice, that's why only a few would reach to that level. I hope this helps.
 
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ktran17

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Apr 12, 2011
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Also, the only specialties in dentistry requiring 4-6 of training is OMFS. Most require only 2-3 years. There are dual trained specialty programs, but they're more of an exception.
 
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Aug 29, 2006
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First, it is not just dentistry, this happens in medicine as well. Second, GP's are not encroaching on the specialties. Some will do more than others, so you must look at the big picture. Look at it like this...plenty of internists treat diabetes although it is the area of the endocrinologist. But not all. Look at the big picture.
 
Jan 28, 2013
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To qualify and advertise as a specialist, I believe something like 80% of your billed codes need to be within your specialty. So there is some wiggle room if you want to do the occasional anything. You just can't build your practice around it.
 
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To qualify and advertise as a specialist, I believe something like 80% of your billed codes need to be within your specialty. So there is some wiggle room if you want to do the occasional anything. You just can't build your practice around it.
This is really interesting. Do u know where I can read more about these kind of regulations?
 
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Jan 28, 2013
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This is really interesting. Do u know where I can read more about these kind of regulations?
Hmm I don't actually. I heard that from an endodontist a few years ago regarding doing the occasional crown, ext, or implant for patients in certain situations. I have no actual sources for my claim. I would think it varies from state to state. I would contact your state dental board and ask about the rules regarding licensing and advertising as a specialist.
 

hahadino2771

7+ Year Member
Aug 26, 2009
83
20
San Francisco, CA
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I know many periodontists who do not advertise themselves as perio but as gp who does both implant placement and restoration. For some reason, they think perio is a dying specialty and they are board certified periodontists...
 
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picksix

2+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2016
33
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It's just the requirement of exclusive advertising rights of calling yourself a specialist in lieu of that, you forfeit your right to do GD which for almost all specialist would be far less profitable.

If you stopped advertising yourself as a specialist, nothing is stopping your from doing GD and doing advance cases you went to school for, like a prosthodontist practicing as a GP
Question.... can then specialists receive a bigger reimbursement amount from the insurances for procedures performed that are in their specialty-realm vs. what a GP would receive for the same procedure? If so, are these procedures very well outlined for reimbursements differences between the specialist and GP? Thanks again for your feedback.
 

Lane138

7+ Year Member
Jun 1, 2010
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Specialists performing a procedure in their specialty get reimbursed more than a GP doing that procedure.

The ADA has a comprehensive survey report with information on what specialists vs GPs charge for each procedure across the different regions in the US. You have to be an ADA member (which if you're in ASDA, you are) you can download it and check it out.
 
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picksix

2+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2016
33
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Pre-Dental
Specialists performing a procedure in their specialty get reimbursed more than a GP doing that procedure.

The ADA has a comprehensive survey report with information on what specialists vs GPs charge for each procedure across the different regions in the US. You have to be an ADA member (which if you're in ASDA, you are) you can download it and check it out.
Is the bigger reimbursement amount linked to how much a specialist charges a patient vs. how much a GP would charge a patient for the same procedure? If so, it seems like the GP could have the upper hand in a hurting economy if he/she is competent with speciality procedures.

I am currently not an ASDA member.
 
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picksix

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Jul 23, 2016
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There is a specialist code on the billing form.
Only specialty-related procedures have this specialist code on the billing form? Or regardless of what procedure you perform you code as a specialist on the billing form? I'm asking because of the overlap between one specialty and another and also a specialist that does not advertise as such and therefore also performs general dentistry...
 
Aug 29, 2006
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New York
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Generally, specialist only bill for procedures within their specialty. The specialist code allows them to receive more third party compensation, if it is available. Only specialists use this code, and you must generally prove to the third party that you are indeed a board eligible specialist by documentation; you cannot just bill out under that code. The advertising thing is a local society issue that comes up when someone gets annoyed, or at least that is what I have seen over the last 32 years in my area.
 
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picksix

2+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2016
33
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Pre-Dental
Ok so If I were only a certified and licensed general dentist and advertised as the following:

Dr. Picksix DDS - Dentistry:
- Orthodontics
- Pediatrics
- Prosthodontics
- Oral Surgery

Would that be permissible/legal? or per ADA ethical so long I am not using the words "limited to" "specializing/specialist" in any of the examples given? Thanks.
 
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picksix

2+ Year Member
Jul 23, 2016
33
3
Status
Pre-Dental
Ok so If I were only a certified and licensed general dentist and advertised as the following:

Dr. Picksix DDS - Dentistry:
- Orthodontics
- Pediatrics
- Prosthodontics
- Oral Surgery

Would that be permissible/legal? or per ADA ethical so long I am not using the words "limited to" "specializing/specialist" in any of the examples given? Thanks.
anyone? I'm really curious, recently every time I am out and spot a dental office I wonder if only a general dentist(s) works there or they have specialists cause it appears they advertise everything! heck it could be a dental therapist in there by him-herself.... OK, bad joke sorry :nono:. But seriously, anyone? :whistle:
 

Lane138

7+ Year Member
Jun 1, 2010
490
89
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If you're a GP you cannot advertise yourself as having any specialty skills in pediatrics, ortho, etc. To be on the safe side you should just use general terms that the public (your advertising target) actually understands, like "cosmetic dentistry," "crowns and dentures," and extractions
 

InspiredDDS

5+ Year Member
Jan 26, 2013
81
16
Status
Dental Student
Ok so If I were only a certified and licensed general dentist and advertised as the following:

Dr. Picksix DDS - Dentistry:
- Orthodontics
- Pediatrics
- Prosthodontics
- Oral Surgery

Would that be permissible/legal? or per ADA ethical so long I am not using the words "limited to" "specializing/specialist" in any of the examples given? Thanks.
Yes that is permissible!