Status
Not open for further replies.

takeeacy

7+ Year Member
May 26, 2010
48
14
Status
Resident [Any Field]
The May 15th deadline is coming up and I'm super confused. I'd greatly appreciate any comments on Mt. Sinai or UChicago. I'm not super familiar with both areas/climates since I am a Cali kid, and while I did get to make it out to Sinai's 2nd look, I couldn't go to UChicago's.

One thing I am really looking for is to find a home for my interest in the humanities, esp. philosophy. I know that Mt. Sinai has its HuMed program and thus draws a lot of humanities kids. I hear that U Chicago has really academic intellectual types of students (esp. in undergrad) and that they may be interested in discussing the humanities. I'd also love to hear thoughts on this as well.
 

pooghe

10+ Year Member
Jan 8, 2009
236
1
Midwest
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Go to UChicago if you're interested at all in merging social science with medicine. They've got great established infrastructure for that as well as medical school faculty who are engaged in that kind of work right now. It's an amazing school and you won't have any regrets going there. What kind of financial aid did you get from them?
 

ResIpsaLoquitur

7+ Year Member
Feb 26, 2010
132
0
Status
Resident [Any Field], Post Doc
Go to UChicago if you're interested at all in merging social science with medicine. They've got great established infrastructure for that as well as medical school faculty who are engaged in that kind of work right now. It's an amazing school and you won't have any regrets going there. What kind of financial aid did you get from them?
I second this! I got into Pritzker but chose to go elsewhere because of significant financial aid differences. If I had the money, this school would have been a top 3 contender for me. I would prefer Chicago over New York for personal reasons but in my opinion, the two cities are essentially the same. Housing might be slightly cheaper in Chicago, and you'd have many more cheaper suburb options in Chicago than you would NY. All else being equal, you can hardly go wrong picking either one! Good luck.
 
About the Ads
Aug 29, 2010
40
0
Status
Pre-Medical
ha as a uchicago undergrad, I can tell you that coming here is a mistake. more on topic though, if you're interested in hum/med, I'd go to the school where there is an established hum/med program where you'll actually be integrating the two. let's be honest, you aren't going to be striking up too many convos with undergrads about the social sciences. I'd also choose nyc over chicago personally. good luck
 
Sep 20, 2011
96
43
Status
Medical Student
Full disclosure: I'm a MS1 at Mount Sinai.

I hope you enjoyed Second Look! Yeah, like you said, we draw a lot of liberal art types - it's pretty interesting to see how talented our classmates are at coffeehouse when people sing, recite poetry, and do standup.

I honestly think you should take cost into consideration - see which school is cheaper. As you probably know, Mount Sinai is a great deal for NYC, since East Harlem/96th St. is not that expensive, and rent at Aron can be only $551/mo. Other than that, I can just say that the lifestyle is great here - I'm taking my Path final over this weekend and I'm in California at the moment, so... :)

Good luck choosing! Feel free to PM me if you have specific questions :D
 

NickNaylor

Thank You for Smoking
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
May 22, 2008
17,166
8,431
Deep in the heart of Texas
Status
Attending Physician
ha as a uchicago undergrad, I can tell you that coming here is a mistake. more on topic though, if you're interested in hum/med, I'd go to the school where there is an established hum/med program where you'll actually be integrating the two. let's be honest, you aren't going to be striking up too many convos with undergrads about the social sciences. I'd also choose nyc over chicago personally. good luck
I imagine as an undergrad you know very little about life as a med student here.

I know nothing about Mt. Sinai, but here are the strengths of Pritzker based on my experiences:

-Strong emphasis on interdisciplinary study - a huge plus if you have interests in other areas outsise of medicine and science

-Strong graduate programs across the board if you're interested in dual degree programs

-COL will be more affordable than in NYC

-Traditional curriculum (could be good or bad depending on your preferences)

-Fantastic summer research program after first year with guaranteed funding. There are also well established community service and global health summer programs with ample funding if you're not interested in research.

-Part of a larger university campus

-Significant emphasis on the social aspects of medicine in the curriculum. Even if you're not interested in underserved populations or social justice (like me), the information is important and I'm glad to have been exposed to it.

-Plenty of free time due to flexibility in the curriculum

-The administration values student feedback in all aspects of the medical school experience and encourages student involvement in how the school operates.

Good luck.
 

penguinism

5+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2011
512
57
Status
Medical Student
hah gotta love that pritzker hospitality right there. def listen to him about campus life though, he's been there less than a year
I would trust a medical student more than an undergraduate...

Did you get any scholarship money at Pritzker?

Also think about location - do you want to be halfway across the US or all the way across the US? :p The only difference that might make is shorter (any maybe cheaper?) plane flights.

Pritzker is top 10 and Sinai is top 20, but that's probably a negligible difference.

*shrug* You can't really go wrong!
 

MilkIsGood

10+ Year Member
Nov 14, 2008
1,052
126
Status
Resident [Any Field]
hah gotta love that pritzker hospitality right there. def listen to him about campus life though, he's been there less than a year
life of a grad student at uchicago is different from that of an undergrad.
 

thlaxer

Passable Paperweight
Feb 19, 2011
531
5
NJ
Status
Medical Student
life of a grad student at uchicago is different from that of an undergrad.
Yup. Several UChicago undergrads I met on the interview trail all talked about the competitiveness of the premeds there. Pritzker students did not give off this vibe at all, they were incredibly friendly and laid back.
 

takeeacy

7+ Year Member
May 26, 2010
48
14
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Thank you all for your input! I got a decent amount of scholarship money from both schools. According to the listed Costs of Attendance, Mt. SInai is ~17k cheaper total after 4 years of med school. I hear that UChicago's costs are slightly inflated, and I personally feel that Mt. Sinai's are slightly an underestimate. Thus, I imagine that the difference in cost is probably a bit less ~5k after 4 years of med school. In short, I think the difference in finances is neglible.

A lot of what Nick said is how I felt about Mt. Sinai. Please correct me if I'm wrong. They're a strong interdiscplinary feel for the medical research - that's its strongly influenced by the humanities & that it focuses on social/humane aspects of medicine. Personally, I'm really interested in medical ethics, and I think Sinai has a lot of that. At both places, I can tell that there's a lot of attention to the students. Curriculums are both P/F, flexible (although I think Sinai's seems more flexible), and traditional.

I imagine as an undergrad you know very little about life as a med student here.

I know nothing about Mt. Sinai, but here are the strengths of Pritzker based on my experiences:

-Strong emphasis on interdisciplinary study - a huge plus if you have interests in other areas outsise of medicine and science

-Strong graduate programs across the board if you're interested in dual degree programs

-COL will be more affordable than in NYC

-Traditional curriculum (could be good or bad depending on your preferences)

-Fantastic summer research program after first year with guaranteed funding. There are also well established community service and global health summer programs with ample funding if you're not interested in research.

-Part of a larger university campus

-Significant emphasis on the social aspects of medicine in the curriculum. Even if you're not interested in underserved populations or social justice (like me), the information is important and I'm glad to have been exposed to it.

-Plenty of free time due to flexibility in the curriculum

-The administration values student feedback in all aspects of the medical school experience and encourages student involvement in how the school operates.

Good luck.
 

NickNaylor

Thank You for Smoking
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
May 22, 2008
17,166
8,431
Deep in the heart of Texas
Status
Attending Physician
hah gotta love that pritzker hospitality right there. def listen to him about campus life though, he's been there less than a year
It's a true statement. Sorry, but just because the medical school is on campus and because you might have some "friends" that go to Pritzker doesn't mean you're an authority about anything related to med school life or the quality of the education here. It's pretty well known that life at the undergrad and life at Pritzker are COMPLETELY different. I interact with undergrads here regularly and think it's entirely true. And the fact is that you really don't know what it's like until you get into it.

I'm not trying to be an ass, but your comments should be qualified because "as an undergrad" you don't know much of anything about being a medical student.

Thank you all for your input! I got a decent amount of scholarship money from both schools. According to the listed Costs of Attendance, Mt. SInai is ~17k cheaper total after 4 years of med school. I hear that UChicago's costs are slightly inflated, and I personally feel that Mt. Sinai's are slightly an underestimate. Thus, I imagine that the difference in cost is probably a bit less ~5k after 4 years of med school. In short, I think the difference in finances is neglible.

A lot of what Nick said is how I felt about Mt. Sinai. Please correct me if I'm wrong. They're a strong interdiscplinary feel for the medical research - that's its strongly influenced by the humanities & that it focuses on social/humane aspects of medicine. Personally, I'm really interested in medical ethics, and I think Sinai has a lot of that. At both places, I can tell that there's a lot of attention to the students. Curriculums are both P/F, flexible (although I think Sinai's seems more flexible), and traditional.
Pritzker's budget is pretty inflated. Depending on your situation and lifestyle preferences, it's entirely feasible to return a fairly significant amount of your loans each quarter.

It seems like both schools are pretty neck and neck based on your description. Frankly $17k isn't all that much in big scheme of things, so I wouldn't let that factor into your decision. Where do you think you would rather be? That's probably the most important factor at this point.
 

CopaceticOne

Stayin' outta trouble
7+ Year Member
Jun 11, 2011
1,132
420
Status
Resident [Any Field]
It seems like both schools are pretty neck and neck based on your description. Frankly $17k isn't all that much in big scheme of things, so I wouldn't let that factor into your decision. Where do you think you would rather be? That's probably the most important factor at this point.
+1 OP based on what you've said, go to the school where you feel you will be most comfortable.
 
About the Ads

NickNaylor

Thank You for Smoking
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
May 22, 2008
17,166
8,431
Deep in the heart of Texas
Status
Attending Physician
Also, if money is a concern and you weren't awarded a full tuition scholarship at Pritzker, you might want to send the admissions office an e-mail and let them know about your situation. There's a good chance that they might throw some more money at you (if that would matter at all).
 

takeeacy

7+ Year Member
May 26, 2010
48
14
Status
Resident [Any Field]
yeah, unfortunately, UChicago was unable to give me more money.

My last question - is prestige comparable between these two schools? And, will it make much of a difference for applying to residencies and jobs later on?
 

darkhope

10+ Year Member
Dec 29, 2006
287
3
Status
Caution, aggregate data:

U Chicago:
Peer assessement score: 4.0
Residency director assessment: 4.3

Mount Sinai:
Peer assessement score: 3.8
Residency director assessment: 3.9
 
Sep 20, 2011
96
43
Status
Medical Student
takeeacy:

I'm just going to respond to Nick's points one by one, but for Sinai.

1. We have a lot of interdisciplinary research too - like you mentioned bioethics, but also I hope you got a sense of how much work we do with East Harlem (and by extension, research into health of the urban underserved). I feel like Mount Sinai really took the community under its wings and it's something that no medical school in NYC can really claim (maaaybe Columbia with Washington Heights), but it's quite cool the number of initiatives that we run in East Harlem (which has the highest rate of preventable hospitalizations in NYC). EHHOP is amazingly well run, and I can see how Sinai won the AAMC Community Service Award in 2009 for that clinic.

This is just among one of the many things they do here...I was recently involved in a research that looked at reducing obesity by partnering with local Spanish and Chinese takeout restaurants, and I thought that was very interesting as a public health project.

2. I'm in the 4-year MD/MPH, and it's pretty cool because Sinai is one of the few schools that has MPH classes after MD classes end, so you can get your MPH degree in the same amount of time as your MD with ~1.5 extra hours of class each day during your first year (I'll be done with the MPH save the thesis by the end of this year). There's also an MS in medical research if you're interested. They're still expanding (I think a MD/MBA with some business school in NYC is in the works), but I thought being public-health minded, the 4-year MD/MPH was an awesome option.

3. I think the area around Mount Sinai is pretty cheap. Yes, if you go downtown it's NYC pricing, but $551/mo is less rent than many cities I've lived in, including Boston and San Francisco.

4. We have a traditional curriculum too, but more importantly, I LOVE our remote testing.

5. We have guaranteed funding too and a robust global health program as well - I just want to note that Sinai kids are pretty research heavy - I would say well over 85% of my class is doing some form of funded research this summer.

6. Sinai is stand-alone, but we are very integrated into the hospital (we share the same building with medical departments from the hospital). Also, there's grad PhD and masters programs here and we do mixers/activities with them as well.

7. See comments about East Harlem - also google our Visiting Doctors program if you haven't heard about it yet. That program really embodies the philosophy of Sinai medicine.

8. For most of first year, you have the bulk of your classes only during the three days in the middle of the week. Monday is generally non-mandatory lecture, and we almost always get Friday afternoons off. Since Sinai has a traditional, lecture-heavy curriculum, if you only go to the mandatory activities (like I do), it's really only 6-7 hours a week in the classroom, which works out great for me since I'm also doing a MPH that has all attendance-mandatory classes. Also, given the fact that we have remote exams, you have a lot of flexibility to make your weekends as busy or as relaxed as you want.

9. The administration has been shockingly accommodating to us (esp compared to my bureaucratic college) - for example, we suggested that we should be able to review our exams online since we take them online anyway, and they allowed us to do so after like 2 weeks (before we had to go into the education office for exam viewing). Also, these few weeks we've been having a Micro quiz and another final in the same weekend, so we emailed the Micro course director and he was willing to push the exam closing time for Micro by 24 hours so we can finish the final first. Bottom line, the faculty and admins here are great :)

---

I know our peer review scores on US News is low for the Top 20, but I really don't know enough about their methodology to know why. You can look at our match list (I think we match pretty well), but we have a surprising number of people staying every year - I think Sinai programs really favor their own students (to an extent I think that is more than many med schools), so you can take that into consideration as well. Our Step 1 average is 235 if you really care about that.
 
Last edited:

NickNaylor

Thank You for Smoking
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
May 22, 2008
17,166
8,431
Deep in the heart of Texas
Status
Attending Physician
To be clear, I wasn't trying to "one-up" Sinai - as I said, I know absolutely nothing the program. I was only meaning to share the benefits of being a Pritzker student from my (limited) perspective without knowing whether or not Sinai has similar programs. I apologize if I came across that way.
 

NickNaylor

Thank You for Smoking
Lifetime Donor
10+ Year Member
May 22, 2008
17,166
8,431
Deep in the heart of Texas
Status
Attending Physician
yeah, unfortunately, UChicago was unable to give me more money.

My last question - is prestige comparable between these two schools? And, will it make much of a difference for applying to residencies and jobs later on?
If you're interested in going to NYC for residency/long-term, Sinai would likely be a better fit for you. NYC is particularly competitive as it's a "highly desirable" area and going to school there with the opportunity to meet local faculty will be helpful. That said, Pritzker certainly won't limit your opportunities (plenty of people match in competitive areas annually), and it would probably be helpful to go to Pritzker if you know that you want to be in the midwest for residency or in the long-term (but, again, Sinai won't necessarily limit your opportunities in that regard). I would hazard a guess and say that Pritzker is more "prestigious" nationally simply because the University of Chicago has a pretty well-known reputation, but prestige/reputation matters very little when it comes to residency applications.
 
Sep 20, 2011
96
43
Status
Medical Student
Yeah, also to be clear, my lengthy response was just to conveniently expand on the points already raised by Nick, but for Sinai, since takeeacy said that he felt much of the same things about Sinai. Definitely no wrong choice either way - sorry I'm so verbose!
 

drizzt3117

chick magnet
10+ Year Member
Oct 29, 2006
14,647
31
Status
Resident [Any Field]
If you're interested in returning to CA for residency, I'd choose uchicago.
 

takeeacy

7+ Year Member
May 26, 2010
48
14
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Thank you all for your helpful advice! Shoutout to NickNaylor - thank you for taking the effort to moderate and help out those considering Pritzker; your advice and comments have been invaluable for me throughout the entire application season. To mistoffelees (mephistopheles?), thank you for the in-depth view and thoughts on Mt. Sinai. I thought the discussion was incredibly civil, and the thoughtful comments helped me a lot in making a decision.

That said, I'm coming to Mt. Sinai!

OH and I looked at the residency director ratings for the US World News Report methodology. My conjecture is that residency directors are making a gut judgment about MSSM graduates who entered/are entering residency in recent years (around 2011). This would mean that the directors are considering MSSM students who entered year of 2007 and years prior. If we take into account that MSSM's leap in the rankings (from 33 to 22 I think) in 2009, I'm guessing that the academic caliber of students, not to put down previous graduates, coming into MSSM probably became more competitive (a guess based of the general trend that higher rankings tend to mean that schools are more selective). Thus, I would expect Residency Director ratings in the US World News Report for MSSM to move up significantly over the next few years as students post-2009 come under the residency director's scrutiny/considerations. This would suggest that ratings would change most significantly after the US World News Report 2014-15 (after post-2009 students enter residency).Given that MSSM's rankings have been moving up since 2009, I think residency director ratings for MSSM will have some significant upward movement for some time.
 
Last edited:

catzzz88

Purrrrrr!?!11??
7+ Year Member
Mar 28, 2011
618
205
Los Angeles
Status
Medical Student
takeeacy:

4. We have a traditional curriculum too, but more importantly, I LOVE our remote testing.
Que?!? What is remote testing? How would that work at all? Is it an honor system? Do any other schools (besides Sinai) have this?

I am perplexed.

Best,
C
 

takeeacy

7+ Year Member
May 26, 2010
48
14
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Que?!? What is remote testing? How would that work at all? Is it an honor system? Do any other schools (besides Sinai) have this?

I am perplexed.

Best,
C
It's online testing; you can do it wherever you have a computer and internet access. It's based off of an honor code. My host at MSSM would often take his online tests in Cali when he visited his girlfriend.

I know that UMich also has a very similar program (I don't know if it's remote though; I think it may be at a specific location) where you can take your tests/quizzes anytime you want between Friday and Sunday. I hear Yale has a similar system as well.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
About the Ads