futuredoctor10

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Hello!
I was just wondering if anyone had a good resource to use for anatomy to help with relationship questions. Some of our exam questions ask about structural relationships and although you can study pictures in Netter, I like READING about the relationships to help reiterate their structural location.

Any advice of good books which may help DESCRIBE relationships in WORDS? Our syllabus notes rarely talk about relationships explicitly.

Thanks!
 

noke

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You can't really go wrong with Baby Moore: Essential Clinical Anatomy.. That worked well for me along with BRS Anatomy Questions and U Mich Questions. I felt the more questions I did, the better I understood the relationships because I had to think through it..
 

DrDrToBe

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Try Gosling et al Human Anatomy Color Atlas and Textbook. It's an excellent resource and the text really explains things nicely, particularly for people like me who don't do well with bullet points and need nice little paragraphs. The photographs are also great, and each photo has an accompanying diagram to point out key features. Love this book.
 
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futuredoctor10

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@Noke and @DrToBe

Would you say these books explained the concepts well and with relationships of structures to each other? How long are their chapters (are they like Grey's: huge)?
 

DrDrToBe

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@Noke and @DrToBe

Would you say these books explained the concepts well and with relationships of structures to each other? How long are their chapters (are they like Grey's: huge)?
Gosling's text is very readable and manageable. It's 430 pages, and each chapter is about 50 pages. Keep in mind that there are photos and diagrams, so although 50 pages may sound like a lot much of it is images and the font size is pretty big. Each chapter also has some clinical skills questions at the end.
Yes, I think it explains concepts well and with relationships of structures to each other. Here's an excerpt:
"Structures deep to gluteus maximus
The arrangement of these structures is clarified by noting whether they enter the buttocks above or below the piriformis muscle (see fig 6.29), which itself enters the greater sciatic foramen (see fig 6.36)."
It then follows with sub-headings such as "Structures entering above piriformis", "Structures entering below piriformis" and gives a paragraph under each heading.
See if your library/ bookstore has it so you can look at it (maybe you can look in it on Amazon?) to see if it works for you. Good luck!
 

skrilladoc

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Go with the Moore: Clinically Oriented Anatomy. Book is large and in charge but the majority of the reading will result in a successful mastering of anatomy and its relationships.

Plus, if you like clinicals and can remember the material that way, the book is full of it.

I like the pictures and diagrams because my professor loves to draw, and he actually draws many pictures similar if not exactly the same.

UMichigan modules are stellar.
 

noke

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@Noke and @DrToBe

Would you say these books explained the concepts well and with relationships of structures to each other? How long are their chapters (are they like Grey's: huge)?
For me, Baby Moore did paint a good picture of the structural relationships in my head. Ultimately, the clinical correlations really help to pull things together. Also, extra time in lab with your cadaver/prosection is extremely useful.
 
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futuredoctor10

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Thanks guys for all the responses! This helps alot. We have our finals coming up and I think this will help with the anatomy practical and written anatomy exams.