1. The SDN iPhone App is back and free through November! Get it today and please post a review on the App Store!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Dismiss Notice

Hepatitis C

Discussion in 'Surgery and Surgical Subspecialties' started by Surgeon11, Aug 12, 2011.

  1. Surgeon11

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    What happens if a resident or fellow acquires hepatitis C via a needlestick during their training?

    Will you be able to continue training? If you go through treatment and clear the virus, is your future practice in jeopardy?
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. ESU_MD

    ESU_MD Old School
    15+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2001
    Messages:
    773
    Likes Received:
    5
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    good question.
    I think you can still practice but have to disclose your hep c status to patients. not sure if this is individually, or how its expected.
    some institutions test you pre-employment and may not even let you on staff.
    I wonder if there are really "cures" from hep c, remission maybe.

    If you get hep c as a surgeon, Probably your best bet is to just go into liver transplant surgery. all those patients have hep c anyway.
    plus you can make contacts to help get up higher on the liver allocation list when its your turn like Steve Jobs.(yes I know he didnt have Hep c)
     
  4. tussy

    tussy Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1999
    Messages:
    714
    Likes Received:
    6
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    this is not an uncommon problem unfortunately. there are strict guidelines as to what procedures a resident can and can't do if they are infected with a blood borne illness and it depends on viral load etc. I think it would be career ending in surgery unless you wanted an office practice only (ie not being a surgeon).

    If you clear the virus then you should be fine. You may have to have studies done to make sure your viral load remains undetectable.
     
  5. badasshairday

    badasshairday Vascular and Interventional Radiology
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Messages:
    3,895
    Likes Received:
    308
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Hep C is scaryh ****. I know there isn't evidence on it, but double glove on every case, or wear ortho gloves.
     
  6. ESU_MD

    ESU_MD Old School
    15+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2001
    Messages:
    773
    Likes Received:
    5
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    thats why I would rather have aids than hep c..... look at magic- his life is pretty good. i wonder if the ladies still hook up with him though.
     
  7. imtiaz

    imtiaz i cant translate stupid
    Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2000
    Messages:
    2,615
    Likes Received:
    15
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    as someone whos going to be a transplant fellow soon, and who doesnt have hepatitis C, i can say that i think about this issue often. i still believe that universal precautions and good surgical technique are your best defense against this type of thing. always wear eye protection, double glove, etc.

    you gotta do what you love. there was an interesting new york times article about this issue a long time ago, but it didnt really go into what a surgeon could do if they were infected. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/03/health/03cons.html

     
  8. Gastrapathy

    Gastrapathy no longer apathetic
    Physician Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2007
    Messages:
    4,583
    Likes Received:
    3,467
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    The last updated guidelines on this topic from the CDC are from the early 90s (and are therefore totally useless). It comes down to individual hospital credentialing committees and your malpractice insurance provider what you are allowed to do and what you have to disclose.

    The "good" news is that the new PIs are FDA approved and cure rates are now 70%+ for genotype 1.
     

Share This Page