Here are my interests, which branch of medicine should I pick?

Oct 13, 2014
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I know I am very interested in brain function and the human personality and I know I am willing to dedicate 100% of my life to my field. I am interested in peoples theories of life and why they do the things they do and all types of psychoanalytically oriented type things, but I am sort of antisocial and I know I could spend long hours in the OR. Generally though, surgeons are not thinkers, right? A psychiatrist would be the one looking at brain and behavior? What about neurologists? Generally, they aren't interested in the patients personality, right? Also, psychology would be the best undergrad major for a career in psychiatry, correct? What about philosophy?
 
Apr 12, 2013
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Pick a major you will enjoy. So psychology, biology, or even philosophy as long as you also complete the pre-reqs. Your interests sound very much like mine. If you decide on med school, psychiatry or behavioral neurology would both fit the bill. Please note that most of med school won't be spent on learning about behavior and "personality". A psychology Doctorate program would from day one.
 
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I know I am very interested in brain function and the human personality and I know I am willing to dedicate 100% of my life to my field. I am interested in peoples theories of life and why they do the things they do and all types of psychoanalytically oriented type things, but I am sort of antisocial and I know I could spend long hours in the OR. Generally though, surgeons are not thinkers, right? A psychiatrist would be the one looking at brain and behavior? What about neurologists? Generally, they aren't interested in the patients personality, right? Also, psychology would be the best undergrad major for a career in psychiatry, correct? What about philosophy?
Psych. You won't even have to change your username.
Undergrad major choice is irrelevant to future career in medicine options. If you like psychology, major in it for that reason.

Also, to the bolded...really? :eyebrow:
 
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WillburCobb

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I know I am very interested in brain function and the human personality and I know I am willing to dedicate 100% of my life to my field. I am interested in peoples theories of life and why they do the things they do...
You're describing social psych which is a branch of psychology, not psychoanalysis or medicine.
 

Ace Khalifa

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Surgeons aren't thinkers? That is the biggest piece of horsesh** I have ever heard. Surgeons (just like doctors of every other specialty) have to think critically on a daily basis. I've seen lots of orthopedic surgeries and a few operations by general surgeons. Every case required the surgeon to think about what they had to do. Also, surgeons aren't antisocial at all - they have to be leaders in the OR and be able to communicate effectively with the rest of the team (OR techs, anesthesiologists, RN's, etc.).
 

altblue

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You're describing social psych which is a branch of psychology, not psychoanalysis or medicine.
To be fair, personality and interpersonal relationships are pretty important in clinical psych.
 

WillburCobb

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To be fair, personality and interpersonal relationships are pretty important in clinical psych.
Per OP "people's theories of life and why they do the things they do..." Yes you can apply it in a clinical setting but it is primarily an area of social psych and is more research oriented than practice oriented.
 
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Futurepsych77
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Also, to the bolded...really? :eyebrow:
I was actually hoping they were because it is my true dream to become a neurosurgeon. I get the impression from research that I've done though that they are not thinkers the way psychiatrists are though. Is this true?
 
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Surgeons aren't thinkers? That is the biggest piece of horsesh** I have ever heard. Surgeons (just like doctors of every other specialty) have to think critically on a daily basis. .
Are surgeons thinkers as much as psychiatrists are though? My research has told me no, but I was hoping it was a yes because my real dream was neurosurgery. I just forgot about it because I read that it was not a thinking specialty.
 

moisne

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I know I am very interested in brain function and the human personality and I know I am willing to dedicate 100% of my life to my field. I am interested in peoples theories of life and why they do the things they do and all types of psychoanalytically oriented type things, but I am sort of antisocial and I know I could spend long hours in the OR. Generally though, surgeons are not thinkers, right? A psychiatrist would be the one looking at brain and behavior? What about neurologists? Generally, they aren't interested in the patients personality, right? Also, psychology would be the best undergrad major for a career in psychiatry, correct? What about philosophy?
I don't think you even understand what each field does...

Pathologist are the stereotypes for antisocial - at least avoiding patients.

Surgeons don't think??? I guess you don't realize when we say "normal" that often refers to just 30% of the population has that structure because everyone is different (I'm speaking anatomically inside the body).

Psychiatrist looking in brain? Are you confusing that with neurology?
philosophy... Wtf?

So if you are entering or just entering college - try to get good grades, get into med school... Then worry about specialty.
 

thesauce

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Wait until your rotations in medical school to decide on a specialty. It's too early right now and there are too many variables - and only you can decide whats best for yourself when the time comes.
I agree that it's too early for the OP to decide, but I also think that waiting until rotations to decide is a bad idea. First off, rotations won't expose you to all of the specialties - not even close. Secondly, if you decide on a competitive specialty late in 3rd year, it can make it tough to get your application "up to par" in time to apply for residency. Finally, you will be practicing in your speciality for 30-40 years, so thinking about it early is never a bad idea.
 
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BrCo

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FYI: Generalized surgeon personalities lean more towards extraversion than introversion. Surgeons have to lead a team, they have to know how to talk to individuals around them in a productive manner. The idea that they are some recluse in the OR, hacking away without really appreciating human interaction or thinking critically is naive.
 

Goro

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PhD in Psychology.

Have a chat with your school's career counseling center. This forum is more suited toward getting into medical school.

I know I am very interested in brain function and the human personality and I know I am willing to dedicate 100% of my life to my field. I am interested in peoples theories of life and why they do the things they do and all types of psychoanalytically oriented type things, but I am sort of antisocial and I know I could spend long hours in the OR. Generally though, surgeons are not thinkers, right? A psychiatrist would be the one looking at brain and behavior? What about neurologists? Generally, they aren't interested in the patients personality, right? Also, psychology would be the best undergrad major for a career in psychiatry, correct? What about philosophy?
 
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The_Bird

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Futurepsych77
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PhD in Psychology.

Have a chat with your school's career counseling center. This forum is more suited toward getting into medical school.
There are also psychiatrists who give talk therapy.
 

The_Bird

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Freud was a neurologist, too.
 

WillburCobb

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Freud was a neurologist, too.
Both were technically physicians by training, but that's about it. There's a reason psychiatrists, psychologists, and psychoanalysts have gone to considerable lengths to establish themselves as separate from each other. I suggest OP does some research beyond Wikipedia.
 

The_Bird

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Both were technically physicians by training, but that's about it. There's a reason psychiatrists, psychologists, and psychoanalysts have gone to considerable lengths to establish themselves as separate from each other. I suggest OP does some research beyond Wikipedia.
+1
 

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there's nothing about a certain specialty that makes it a "thinking" specialty. Every physician has to have a deep and accessible knowledge of the field of medicine they specialized in. They have to think deeply about how things work in the human body, how to best interact with their patients, how to best organize their time, how to allocate their research time (if they have research), how to build a practice, how to be more cost-effective.

The grueling nature of the training makes this an inherently self-reflective profession, evidenced by the number of physician authors whose work non-physicians and physicians alike enjoy.

There is no "thinking" specialty, only "thinking" people. Im not sure you have a strong grounding in what psychiatric care entails today in most practises. Neurosurgery and neurology are totally different specialties too with different training, nsurg in particular.
 

moop

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there's nothing about a certain specialty that makes it a "thinking" specialty. Every physician has to have a deep and accessible knowledge of the field of medicine they specialized in. They have to think deeply about how things work in the human body, how to best interact with their patients, how to best organize their time, how to allocate their research time (if they have research), how to build a practice, how to be more cost-effective.

The grueling nature of the training makes this an inherently self-reflective profession, evidenced by the number of physician authors whose work non-physicians and physicians alike enjoy.

There is no "thinking" specialty, only "thinking" people. Im not sure you have a strong grounding in what psychiatric care entails today in most practises. Neurosurgery and neurology are totally different specialties too with different training, nsurg in particular.
You're wrong. Surgery is a thinking specialty. So is ROAD. Family medicine/primary care/low paying ones are not.

Edit: c'mon people, don't be so thick. Recognize overt sarcasm when it is overt.
 
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You're wrong. Surgery is a thinking specialty. So is ROAD. Family medicine/primary care/low paying ones are not.
I'd argue any specialty is a thinking specialty. Making such a generalization that a field does not require thinking is rather disgusting in any part. There's a reason people go to school for medicine. It requires complex thought and thinking processes, regardless of specialty.
 
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moop

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I'd argue any specialty is a thinking specialty. Making such a generalization that a field does not require thinking is rather disgusting in any part. There's a reason people go to school for medicine. It requires complex thought and thinking processes, regardless of specialty.
You're wrong. It's a stretch to argue that anyone thinks in the field of medicine
Why do we have Obamacare if doctors were thinking people? Right? lol

(In case I have to spell it out for you, which it seems like I do: :troll:)
 
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Futurepsych77
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A professor told me that if I am interested in psychology to go for psychoanalytic training after the MD and not to accept insurance. A therapist agreed that they are the 'top' of the field. How can I be sure to keep up with the field not connected to a hospital or being an academic psychiatrist?
 

The_Bird

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A professor told me that if I am interested in psychology to go for psychoanalytic training after the MD and not to accept insurance. A therapist agreed that they are the 'top' of the field. How can I be sure to keep up with the field not connected to a hospital or being an academic psychiatrist?
This is something you won't have to worry about for a loooong time. For all we know the accepted treatment methods will have changed dramatically by then and a psychoanalyst might not even exist. Worry about getting good grades and learning more about your interests through application. What I mean by that is shadow a few physicians in primary care and see if being a doctor is something you would actually enjoy. Also shadow some psychologists for the same reason
 
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WillburCobb

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A professor told me that if I am interested in psychology to go for psychoanalytic training after the MD and not to accept insurance. A therapist agreed that they are the 'top' of the field. How can I be sure to keep up with the field not connected to a hospital or being an academic psychiatrist?
They aren't the "top" of the field, they're a different field. I'm pretty sure you misinterpreted their advice as well. The major incentive to what they're suggesting is $$$. Also, I'm fairly certain psychoanalysis isn't covered by most, if any, insurance companies anyways. You're putting the cart before the horse. Research what the fields entail (from REPUTABLE sources) and try to shadow if possible.