High-level science needed, or just the pre-reqs would be enough?

May 27, 2009
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Pre-Medical
I already have a BS & MS degrees in Computer Engineering, and am studying my second-bachelors degree in Biomedical Sciences in order to satisfy the pre-req course requirements as a degree-seeking student. Currently, I've been working for full-time as a computer engineer.

I honestly don't have that time, money and patience to finish my second-bachelors. Maybe, I'll do that during the gliding year, if I'll be accepted.

Are pre-reqs alone (including Biochemistry) would be enough both for the MCAT and for becoming a competitive applicant? How do you recommend to take additional high-level science courses before my applications?
 

gravitywave

fourth year
Dec 19, 2009
2,078
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yes, pre-reqs are enough. ask me how i know :D plenty of people get in that way.

good call on entering a degree program to score financial aid. drop out after the spring semester and then apply. there's shockingly little added value to having upper level UG science for medical school, especially if you're adding debt to get it.
 
OP
ceng2doc
May 27, 2009
287
0
Status
Pre-Medical
yes, pre-reqs are enough. ask me how i know :D plenty of people get in that way.

good call on entering a degree program to score financial aid. drop out after the spring semester and then apply. there's shockingly little added value to having upper level UG science for medical school, especially if you're adding debt to get it.
I've been seeing in many schools' websites that they "recommend" high-level science courses besides pre-reqs. Is it a deal maker/breaker?

Also, how did you get prepared on topics like human anatomy, organs, systems, etc. for MCAT? When I check AAMC's MCAT topics, I see a lot of questions coming from that side. However, we've only studied the cell structure and function, respiration, photosynthesis, mitosis and meiosis, genetics and gene expression, evolution, speculation, history of life, and ecology during my bio-1 and bio-2 lectures. How do you think taking A&P 1-2 courses is gonna be a must, or just an overkill?
 

gravitywave

fourth year
Dec 19, 2009
2,078
9
s/p ERAS
Status
Medical Student
I've been seeing in many schools' websites that they "recommend" high-level science courses besides pre-reqs. Is it a deal maker/breaker?

Also, how did you get prepared on topics like human anatomy, organs, systems, etc. for MCAT? When I check AAMC's MCAT topics, I see a lot of questions coming from that side. However, we've only studied the cell structure and function, respiration, photosynthesis, mitosis and meiosis, genetics and gene expression, evolution, speculation, history of life, and ecology during my bio-1 and bio-2 lectures. How do you think taking A&P 1-2 courses is gonna be a must, or just an overkill?
they "recommend" it, but it isn't a "hard" recommendation like getting clinical experience. personally i wouldn't recommend it at all, although i think i'm in the minority on that one. the exception would be Biochem, which i suspect is going to become a pre-req everywhere pretty soon.

undergraduate A+P is pretty low yield considering the level at which it's taught and the fact that anatomy doesn't appear on the MCAT. You ought to be able to teach yourself the physio that you need for the test, using prep materials (Kaplan, ExamKrackers et al)
 

Catalystik

The Gimlet Eye
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Are pre-reqs alone (including Biochemistry) would be enough both for the MCAT and for becoming a competitive applicant? How do you recommend to take additional high-level science courses before my applications?
If you have a high BCPM, I'd think you'd be fine without a lot of upper-level Bio classes. If your grades in the prerequisites are more mediocre, then some As in upper-level Bio help show adcomms that you have what it takes to succeed in similar coursework during med school, and thus, IMO, would make you more competitive.

And if you did decide to take more upper-level Bio, the courses that might help on the MCAT are physiology, cell bio, and genetics.