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Hmmm... Looks like the hemorrhage is only going to continue!

Discussion in 'Military Medicine' started by Capt_Mac, Apr 10, 2007.

  1. Capt_Mac

    Capt_Mac Member

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    http://www.military.com/features/0,15240,130518,00.html

    I am usually a lurker here on these boards and find the reading very interesting. I just wanted to share this little nugget with all those here. Who knows, maybe this tranlates to a pink slip in the future with the thanks of a grateful nation and a small severence package!
     
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  3. Sgt Whizzo

    Sgt Whizzo Male Member

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    Very interesting. Does anyone think military tertiary care centers will entirely shut down? Some would argue that we could maintain readiness better by having surgeons that actually do an adequate volume of cases at VA and civilian hospitals and essentially either are active duty or guard/reserve on call. I know an Army thoracic surgeon who is on active duty working at a non-military teaching hospital providing VA support and on call for deployment (rotates through Iraq regularly). So he gets academics, cases, and can fulfill his active duty commitment in a satisfying environment. Wouldn't mind if that arrangement were more widely available. I don't know, I can't believe that health care can't be delivered more efficiently than the military does it...there are so many layers of admin and things like AHLTA that I don't think the private sector (see laws of economics) tolerates. What do you guys think about non-combat related specialists like endocrinology, oncology, rheumatology, etc...do you think, as I think Capt_Mac implies, that they may be cut loose before their commitments are up?
     
  4. Capt_Mac

    Capt_Mac Member

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    Whizz -

    I agree about keeping up the readiness. Would it be better to keep people on a reserve status and sending them out to academic institutions to practice and then call them up when it is time for deployment?

    I do know that at our MTF, they are already farming out dependents from the MTF based PCMs to civilian sector.
     
  5. BomberDoc

    BomberDoc ex-BomberDoc

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    Not a chance. They will be utilized/deployed as GMOs and this mistreatment will ensure everybody runs for the door when their commitment is up, just as the puppetmasters planned.
     
  6. Sgt Whizzo

    Sgt Whizzo Male Member

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    Jeez you seem cynical. Reminds me of when I was working at a tertiary care MTF we were having problems getting people GI referrals. See we were down to one gastroenterologist and the only community guys who would take the tricare referrals did, shall we say, substandard work. Anyway, the point of my story is that Bomber Doc may (sadly) be right. In this case, the one gastroenterolgist was sent overseas for 4 months to run a sick call clinic. Great use of resources, huh? Anyway, I bet some smart guy will fill some of those flight surgeon slots with endocrinologists, etc. Who cares that maybe the country could use their skills elsewhere. Someone would win an award and get an early promotion for solving (temporarily) the shortage of primary care guys. Hey, we could have cardiologists run sick call too!
     
  7. gastrodoc

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    Could? Try do. I'm seeing sickcall for the next 12-18 months (interventional GI). In the plywood stall next to me? Developmental Peds. Next to him? Cards.
    Rummy will get his way and mil med will die. Count how many O-5's you know on AD. Truly sad.
     
  8. Ex-44E3A

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    Yep... every time I was deployed, the surgeons (general and ortho) saw sick call right alongside the ER, IM, and FP guys.

    When you're deployed, it doesn't matter who you are; you bite into the **** sandwich right along with everyone else.
     
  9. BomberDoc

    BomberDoc ex-BomberDoc

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    Cynical? Me? Guilty as charged. A few years ago I deployed with a general surgeon who did the same thing I did... saw sick call and handed out motrin. There wasn't even anesthesia or an operating suite on the base. He was just putting in his time until he could get out. I'm doing the same.
     
  10. Ex-44E3A

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    There was no "real job" for the surgeons to do. Out of the two times I deployed, the general surgeons did exactly one appy... that's it. The ortho guys did a little more, but nothing you'd consider even remotely resembling a full case-load.

    So most of the time, they rotated through our little "ER" right along with the rest of us.

    Our anesthesia people were CRNAs, not MDs, so they didn't see sick call.
     
  11. Sgt Whizzo

    Sgt Whizzo Male Member

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    Wow, that's amazing..."developmental peds" is deployed? Now I'm not contesting that I've met a lot of active duty guys who might not have met all their milestones...but for goodness sakes that's sad--we need to focus on their dysfunctional families at home before taking developmental peds to the war zone. I believe wholeheartedly that having good pediatric and adult primary care back home for the families is critical to morale. You can't have any assurance that families are getting good/timely care while the spouses are deployed if they have to go down town, especially for specialty care that tricare grossly underpays like child psych and dev. peds. Naturally, with the understaffing/overdeployment of MTF's, access to care within the MTF is poor too. Hmmm. I guess I have heard other people suggest what gastrodoc has suggested about a nefarious conspiracy to phase us out. But, I can't spend any more time writing about this, I have to get back to my computer-based professional military education so I can have a great military career. Oh, wait, I decided not to bother with that training because the military medicine career looks so bleak.
     

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