Quantcast

Home health Aide vs CNA vs Phlebotomy

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

Geo16

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2016
Messages
1,107
Reaction score
678

Members don't see this ad.
Stuck between three options!!
Currently doing a volunteer that is similar to HHA (pass/collect meal trays, help patients up or take them to the shower, or dismiss a patient). So there isn't much to worry about clinical/patient contact hour right now.
But I want to earn money so that I can support myself & have an income :)


Here is what makes it difficult: I want to keep doing volunteer work at the hospital.
Here are some pros&cons:

Home Health Aide (HHA)
Pros:
Only $700-800 and 4 weeks of training- able to work at hospice/nursing home with less cost/training
Cons:
Job might be redundantly same as the volunteer (difference will be in the settings- volunteer at the hospital and working at the hospice/nursing home)


Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA)
Pros:
Able to do more than a volunteer & HHA (check vital sign, give medication, report to RN/Doc)
Cons:
$1600-1800 and 6-8 weeks training.

Phlebotomy
Pros:
Do something different than volunteer/HHA/CNA
Cons:
$1600-2000 and 6-8 weeks training
I'm not a vampire


Not sure what I want to do! Can someone nudge me into one direction?
 

all things possible

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2013
Messages
410
Reaction score
358
You'd probably make the most doing phlebotomy. Better return on investment IMHO.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

all things possible

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2013
Messages
410
Reaction score
358
Never considered the wage! I think in that sense, Phlebotomy Tech would rock...
Still those prices are pretty hefty and lengthy. Are you sure you couldn't find other schools/companies offering training for cheaper.

I remember a while ago I wanted to do phlebotomy and they were offering classes taught in 3 days for like $600 or so...
 

Geo16

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2016
Messages
1,107
Reaction score
678
Still those prices are pretty hefty and lengthy. Are you sure you couldn't find other schools/companies offering training for cheaper.

I remember a while ago I wanted to do phlebotomy and they were offering classes taught in 3 days for like $600 or so...
There is one that costs $600 and it is only 28 hours - which I suspect it's for Limited Phlebotomy Technician (LPT).
 
D

deleted781806

I know that at least for CNAs sometimes your future employer will help cover the cost of your training as part of the hiring process (as long as you interview for the position beforehand). This might not hold true for phlebotomists though, you would have to look into it yourself.
 

Geo16

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2016
Messages
1,107
Reaction score
678
I know that at least for CNAs sometimes your future employer will help cover the cost of your training as part of the hiring process (as long as you interview for the position beforehand). This might not hold true for phlebotomists though, you would have to look into it yourself.
Yeah, heard some similar things with the CNAs I work with.
I'm definitely sure that is available for full-time though :) I'm looking to do part-time.
 
D

deleted781806

I'm definitely sure that is available for full-time though :) I'm looking to do part-time.
You never know until you ask, depending on the job market around where you are living, they might even extend such offers to part-time CNAs. But you are right, it is most likely for full-time employees rather than part-time, but it wouldn't hurt to check. I think with picking between the three, I'd probably go for CNA or Phlebotomist because they are more directly related in a hospital setting compared to a HHA. But picking between the two would depend greatly on what kind of work you enjoy (or think you'd enjoy) as well as the pay that comes along with it. Best of luck in your endeavors!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Geo16

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2016
Messages
1,107
Reaction score
678
You never know until you ask, depending on the job market around where you are living, they might even extend such offers to part-time CNAs. But you are right, it is most likely for full-time employees rather than part-time, but it wouldn't hurt to check. I think with picking between the three, I'd probably go for CNA or Phlebotomist because they are more directly related in a hospital setting compared to a HHA. But picking between the two would depend greatly on what kind of work you enjoy (or think you'd enjoy) as well as the pay that comes along with it. Best of luck in your endeavors!
I'm going to do my best.
Hmm, what I would enjoy the most? I do feel that Phlebotomist would do nicely since the job is certified to do something that CNA/HHA/volunteers are not able to do. So I might enjoy the phlebotomist the most. But the cost (lol) was my biggest concern. Don't get me wrong, I'd be happy to work as HHA/CNA in nursing home/hospice though. But out of all 3, I would enjoy being Phlebotomist the most.
 
D

deleted781806

Always think about enjoyment and compensation when debating between jobs, it's finding the balance between what you want to do / will enjoy doing vs. what will pay you well/enough. There's a lot of different factors that make each of these opportunities unique, so it's really up to what you value the most in a position, and you'll have to come to that conclusion yourself haha. Personally, I don't think there is a "bad choice" between these three, but I'm in no position to tell you which one would be best for you in the long run. You'll figure it out!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Geo16

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2016
Messages
1,107
Reaction score
678
Always think about enjoyment and compensation when debating between jobs, it's finding the balance between what you want to do / will enjoy doing vs. what will pay you well/enough. There's a lot of different factors that make each of these opportunities unique, so it's really up to what you value the most in a position, and you'll have to come to that conclusion yourself haha. Personally, I don't think there is a "bad choice" between these three, but I'm in no position to tell you which one would be best for you in the long run. You'll figure it out!
I strongly agree that there isn't a bad choice here, just differences in minor pros and cons.
Definitely would enjoy being a Phlebotomist. It's just the cost that is stopping me at the moment, but minus that, I think I would be happy at the end of the day.
 

flapjack3d

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2015
Messages
733
Reaction score
854
I've never heard of CNA costing that much. Check your local community college. IIRC mine was 3 weekends in a row and cost 400
 

Geo16

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2016
Messages
1,107
Reaction score
678
I've never heard of CNA costing that much. Check your local community college. IIRC mine was 3 weekends in a row and cost 400
Unfortunately, there isn't one available during the summer. There is a free CNA program at my college that requires 8 units. But, to finish my pre-med work in a timely manner, I need to take Phys 1, Gen Bio 1 , Ochem 1(14 units) this fall. There is no way I can appeal for exceeding unit for CNA program + do well in my courses.. x_x
 
Last edited:

Geo16

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2016
Messages
1,107
Reaction score
678
I'll definitely take three of your advice and look for ways to pay (or to reduce the cost via finding a cheaper program) for Phlebotomy/CNA program.
But I can say that my heart currently calls for Phlebotomy. Didn't have any particular interest before posting this, but I realized: the job is blatantly amazing!
Didn't really think of 'what interests' me before posting, as all three sounded equally interesting and cool. Now it's kind of clear.

Edit: suddenly this idea came across: I can hold off Ochem till 18-19 year and take CNA program for free. How do you guys feel about this?
 
Last edited:

TXMED_1695

Full Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2016
Messages
171
Reaction score
147
CNA: It all depends on where you are going to work. I volunteered as a CNA at a nursing home, and during a 12 hour shift, I rarely was not on the go. If they do not have a hired shower aid, it is close to impossible to keep up with everything (Someone is always quitting, or calling in sick). But in a hospital, I really enjoyed working as a CNA.

Phlebotomist: A lot less demanding on your body, and your patient care is completely different than a CNA. If you do not want to do dirty work, (changing patients, cleaning catheters, bed pans, ect.) this is the one to pick.

HHA: I have no experience in home health care.

In a nursing home only, I would not pick CNA, because from my experience they are always too understaffed. A Phlebotomist still has patient contact, but without having to do any of the back breaking work. Sometimes I looked at Phlebotomist with envy, and I do not think they were ever looking back at my tasks the same way.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Geo16

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2016
Messages
1,107
Reaction score
678
CNA: It all depends on where you are going to work. I volunteered as a CNA at a nursing home, and during a 12 hour shift, I rarely was not on the go. If they do not have a hired shower aid, it is close to impossible to keep up with everything (Someone is always quitting, or calling in sick). But in a hospital, I really enjoyed working as a CNA.

Phlebotomist: A lot less demanding on your body, and your patient care is completely different than a CNA. If you do not want to do dirty work, (changing patients, cleaning catheters, bed pans, ect.) this is the one to pick.

HHA: I have no experience in home health care.

In a nursing home only, I would not pick CNA, because from my experience they are always too understaffed. A Phlebotomist still has patient contact, but without having to do any of the back breaking work. Sometimes I looked at Phlebotomist with envy, and I do not think they were ever looking back at my tasks the same way.
Thanks TXMED! I appreciate your input... This is a golden info!
Do you think going for Phlebotomist would worth $1600? Or do you think I should hold off Ochem 1 year to get CNA certification(free program)?
What's your opinion?
 

Geo16

Full Member
2+ Year Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2016
Messages
1,107
Reaction score
678
I just found out that HHA isn't a standalone certificate. What a fool!! Trying to find a cheap CNA program around LA.
I've schedules registration for Phlebotomy class.
 
Top