Quantcast

Honors Chemistry.. Do med schools notice it?

BeMo Free Repeat™ On Us + 5 Med School Challenge
This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

blackarrowmoose

Membership Revoked
Removed
Joined
Aug 14, 2010
Messages
167
Reaction score
0
Ok long story short, im not here to complain but at freshman orientation they told us (high AP scorers) that med schools like to see higher level coursework over regular intro coursework. So they advised me to take a honors general chemistry course over the regular intro gen chem.

Fact is, im pretty much doing "average" every test, im getting about -2 or +2 points around the average. So I dont even really know what grade im supposed to expect. Anyway, im just curious, do med schools actually care about honors? Or is it a load of crap
 

Emerica

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2009
Messages
115
Reaction score
0
From what I've heard, med schools would rather see an A in a non-honors course than a C in an honors course. Essentially, the higher GPA wins out.

You must constantly question information that is provided to you, even if it is coming from a pre-med advisor. If I was going to make a C in that honors chem class, I would drop it and take normal gen chem to make an A.
 

blackarrowmoose

Membership Revoked
Removed
Joined
Aug 14, 2010
Messages
167
Reaction score
0
yeah... but the semester only has 4 weeks left and i can't really switch to a different chemistry track. I spoke to my professor and he told me im probably going to get a B-, but he said don't worry too much its my first semester and he wouldnt expect much better.?
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

Osteo Dullahan
10+ Year Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2009
Messages
16,179
Reaction score
5,880
More or less for the extra work and labor its not worth it and medical schools will not care too much.
 

BBender716

Med school drop out!
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2009
Messages
5,039
Reaction score
6
Sounds like the spiel they gave us at my school. I opted for the lower track, got into med school, and never looked back. :thumbup:
 

Emerica

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2009
Messages
115
Reaction score
0
yeah... but the semester only has 4 weeks left and i can't really switch to a different chemistry track. I spoke to my professor and he told me im probably going to get a B-, but he said don't worry too much its my first semester and he wouldnt expect much better.?


A B- won't hurt your GPA too much, so my renewed advice to you is to really bust your ass in that class to get the best grade you can and then next semester, take the regular second-semester general chemistry.

I also did well on my AP Chem exam and my previous experience in chemistry makes gen chem 1 an intensive review, I expect a similar experience in gen chem 2.
 

RogueUnicorn

rawr.
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
9,746
Reaction score
1,659
Ok long story short, im not here to complain but at freshman orientation they told us (high AP scorers) that med schools like to see higher level coursework over regular intro coursework. So they advised me to take a honors general chemistry course over the regular intro gen chem.

Fact is, im pretty much doing "average" every test, im getting about -2 or +2 points around the average. So I dont even really know what grade im supposed to expect. Anyway, im just curious, do med schools actually care about honors? Or is it a load of crap
med schools might not care, but your undergrad sure will when it comes to writing committee letters. honors classes are also smaller and allow for a personal relationship with faculty, which is WAY more valuable, imo, than a single A or B in a class. also, at least at my school, the honors class was curved to a higher grade.
 

blackarrowmoose

Membership Revoked
Removed
Joined
Aug 14, 2010
Messages
167
Reaction score
0
ok thanks for the advice guys. I spoke to my advisor via email and i found out that the major im pursing (integrated dual-degree program), my honors chem class is generally "required" unless i take a 2 credit lab course to compensate for it. its so confusing lol
 

ssahjm

It's a trap!
Joined
Jun 9, 2010
Messages
131
Reaction score
0
med schools might not care, but your undergrad sure will when it comes to writing committee letters. honors classes are also smaller and allow for a personal relationship with faculty, which is WAY more valuable, imo, than a single A or B in a class. also, at least at my school, the honors class was curved to a higher grade.

I agree with the part about the committee letters! Many of the professors who were chairs on our pre-med committee taught honors courses, so it was great to have an "in" with the people who would be writing my letters. We didn't have our honors classes curved into our grades, though. :(
 

Envix

Full Member
5+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2010
Messages
52
Reaction score
0
At my school, we offer 2-4 versions of scaling difficulty for basically every science class, and as a biochemistry major, I've taken the hardest one almost every time.

My GPA isn't that great, but those hard classes probably contributed to my high MCAT score, and my advisor letter specifically emphasized the grade deflation of my major. I was also able to get personalized recommendation letters because of the smaller classes.

Basically, they 90% just care about your GPA, not what classes you took or what major/double major you are, so take what will best suit your GPA. For me, harder classes motivate me more anyways, so a small dip in GPA is worth it for the other advantages. For most people: take the easier route. This is well represented in the fact that out of 400 people applying to medical school out of my school, about 15 are my major.

Remember, your advisors tell you advice for how to best expand your knowledge and receive an education, when in reality you need advice of how to best get into medical school.
 

ischemic2

Full Member
Removed
Joined
Oct 31, 2010
Messages
16
Reaction score
0
No, med schools don't really notice. As long as you have one or two good rec letters it also doesn't mean much in terms of getting an "in" on the committee letter. That's what I think at least.
 

Emerica

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2009
Messages
115
Reaction score
0
No, med schools don't really notice. As long as you have one or two good rec letters it also doesn't mean much in terms of getting an "in" on the committee letter. That's what I think at least.


I agree with this.
 

blackarrowmoose

Membership Revoked
Removed
Joined
Aug 14, 2010
Messages
167
Reaction score
0
At my school, we offer 2-4 versions of scaling difficulty for basically every science class, and as a biochemistry major, I've taken the hardest one almost every time.

My GPA isn't that great, but those hard classes probably contributed to my high MCAT score, and my advisor letter specifically emphasized the grade deflation of my major. I was also able to get personalized recommendation letters because of the smaller classes.

Basically, they 90% just care about your GPA, not what classes you took or what major/double major you are, so take what will best suit your GPA. For me, harder classes motivate me more anyways, so a small dip in GPA is worth it for the other advantages. For most people: take the easier route. This is well represented in the fact that out of 400 people applying to medical school out of my school, about 15 are my major.

Remember, your advisors tell you advice for how to best expand your knowledge and receive an education, when in reality you need advice of how to best get into medical school.

im in the exact same boat as you, im a biochemistry major thats why i have to take the harder classes. How is your success in applying to med school?
 
Top