Dismiss Notice
Last chance to give your feedback! Fill out the 2019 SDN Member Survey to let us know what's important to you (and win prizes!)

Hospital Job

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by mellsworth21, Feb 18, 2007.

  1. mellsworth21

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2007
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Hello. I was just wanting some input. I want to have a small part time job in a hospital for this summer since Im just taking 1 or 2 summer classes. Can anyone give me any ideas? Thanks
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  2. chad5871

    Physician Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    11
    MDApps:
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Go to google and search for hospitals you are interested in working at. Most have a link on their main page entitled "Careers" or something to that effect. Then browse their online job postings and see if there's anything part time that you qualify for. Then just start applying...

    If the hospitals you're interested in don't have online applications, call or stop by their human resources department. They should be able to help you out.

    Good luck!
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  3. Catalystik

    Catalystik Platinum
    Physician Faculty Verified Expert Verified Account 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    30,451
    Likes Received:
    10,267
    A job in the dietary department as an aide does not require previous training or experience, allows for some interaction with patients, and gives the potential for becoming aware of what diets are needed for certain conditions, so you might even learn something. They'd be happy to hire you part-time so they don't have to provide benefits. Unfortunately, it only pays minimum wage. Consider nursing homes as another source of this type of employment.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  4. Bubblewrap777

    Bubblewrap777 New Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2006
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Try to get a job as a transporter, they take patients to the different deptartments for tests, you get alot of direct patient contact, you dont need any speical training (just CPR), plus you may get a good LOR from a doctor...

    I have been doing it for 5 years and I have learned alot and have seen alot :)
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  5. eagle07

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2006
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    In your hometown, go to some of the hospitals and talk to nursing directors in areas you are interested in. They might have hidden jobs for college students that require little to no experience. For example, I worked for 2 summers as an attendant in the surgery department of one of my local hospitals. It was a great experience since I got to help prep for cases, set up/clean up rooms, etc. It's a position they only have 1-2 of per year for kids from that area and you kinda just hear about it by word of mouth.
     
  6. Vanguard23

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Messages:
    770
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Do what I did: Become a Pharmacy Technician.
    www.ptcb.org
    quick test and you're in.
    Thing about mine, while I am getting the clinical experience, I work midnights and go on codes(Cardiac and respiratory arrests) since there aren't any pharmacists to do it on midnights except one guy and he has to enter orders on a computer.
    As such, I get to watch an ER doctor and a room full of nurses try to save a patient.
    I hand em the meds.
     
  7. NCF145

    NCF145 Not Politically Correct
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2005
    Messages:
    3,138
    Likes Received:
    3
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    phlebotomy. you go everywhere in the hospital, and get as much patient exposure and contact that you could/would ever want.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  8. Vanguard23

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Messages:
    770
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    That's true as well. Phlebotomists have more patient interaction.
     
  9. NCF145

    NCF145 Not Politically Correct
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2005
    Messages:
    3,138
    Likes Received:
    3
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Phlebotomy is also fun b/c it lets you perform "invasive" procedures, and can be challenging if you have patients who are hard sticks (sickle cell pts.) If you are pretty good at performing venipunctures, then your work may also train you to perform arterial sticks. These skills will definitely come in handy when you are doing your rotations.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  10. geogil

    geogil Still training.
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2006
    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    21
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    i'm a phleb and I can say it's great, you get amazing patient contact (good and bad patients). I get to work in the ER on traumas. One main benefit is that you gain an appreciation for the lab and how it works, which will benefit you in school and beyond. I say this because there are many nurses and docs who have no idea what goes on in the lab. Case in point: Dr. orders a CBC on bagged urine. NO CAN DO. I learned how to be a phleb taking classes at night one summer, it was about 6 weeks. If you're in Oregon I can give you some good leads....
     
  11. OP
    OP
    mellsworth21

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2007
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Thanks alot everyone. I'm in Ohio (Akron/Cleveland area) and there is a plethora of world class hospitals all around my campus, which I'll be stuck at all summer. I'm really excited to follow up on this advice!
    I was also wondering on what your thoughts are on EMT's. Are any of you EMT's I know the training can count towards college credit, it has to look good on your admisions? Thanks...
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  12. NY Musicologist

    NY Musicologist Career Changer
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2005
    Messages:
    281
    Likes Received:
    0
    What about CNAs? I know some people who go this route end up being pretty much exclusively diaper-changers, but couldn't someone who was bright, eager to learn, polite to the other nurses, etc. end up getting to at least see (if not, perhaps, actually DO) some interesting stuff?
     
  13. NCF145

    NCF145 Not Politically Correct
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2005
    Messages:
    3,138
    Likes Received:
    3
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Why in the world would a Dr. order a complete blood count (CBC) on a bagged urine? :confused:
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  14. geogil

    geogil Still training.
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2006
    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    21
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    You would have to wonder, wouldn't you? I'm at a community hospital too, no residents or students. This was a bona fide attending who was irate that we couldn't accomodate his ridiculous request. I'm also a real fan of the nurses who want to share a fingerstick glucose with say, a PT or a chem screen. You can do them simultaneously of course, but you can't technically share them. While I'm ranting, I have nurses call me up all the time wanting to use blood in lab when it's not possible. Because of various tube additives, it's not possible to share an EDTA specimen with something that requires heparinized plasma. Do they teach this in nursing school? I hope so, but I doubt it. Judging from the irate voices on the other end of the phone, I don't think they do.
     
  15. NCF145

    NCF145 Not Politically Correct
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2005
    Messages:
    3,138
    Likes Received:
    3
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    The nurses at my hospital were def. not taught this. They can be so frustrating.:mad:
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  16. geogil

    geogil Still training.
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2006
    Messages:
    918
    Likes Received:
    21
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    I think that for a lot of physicians and nurses the lab is a black mystery box. Specimens go in, numbers come out, and who cares what miracles happen in between. I know that when I'm a doctor, I won't ask for stupid crap like a UA on a renal patient who hasn't peed in 15 years. (ok, that one was from a friend at OHSU, but you get the idea).
     
  17. em783

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2006
    Messages:
    137
    Likes Received:
    3
    Status:
    Medical Student

    I have a question ... how did you prepare for this pharmacy technician exam if it is online and all the questions are pharm. related? Do you already have a background in this or did you take a Pharmacology course as an undergrad or something? Or was there a particular guide you studied?
     
  18. Droopy Snoopy

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2006
    Messages:
    1,847
    Likes Received:
    11
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    I worked three hospital jobs through hs and undergrad: lab tech, admissions coordinator, and ER tech. None had any certification or educations reqs associated with them. The admissions thing paid the most, about the same as a pharmacy tech. The ER job was the most fun. I had a friend who was a transporter and he liked it, but you should be in decent shape.
     
  19. LabMonster

    LabMonster Clinically relevant.
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    Messages:
    1,384
    Likes Received:
    139
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Lab tech - and no degree huh? Never wonder why laboratory professionals have chips on their shoulders... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_Technologist

    Anyway - I would agree that phlebotomy is an excellent choice with a minimum of 'official' training. If you are a college sophomore, it's not too late to switch to Allied Health - Medical Technology either ;)

    I would urge anything that provides you with a LOT of patient contact, but phlebotomy provides a unique opportunity, because when you appear before a patient - you're there to stick a needle in them. This "pre-conceived" notion can definitely improve your interpersonal skills and people-problem solving ability.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  20. NCF145

    NCF145 Not Politically Correct
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2005
    Messages:
    3,138
    Likes Received:
    3
    Status:
    Resident [Any Field]
    Ha. As a phlebotomist you really are the last person that every patient in the hospital wants to see.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  21. LabMonster

    LabMonster Clinically relevant.
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    Messages:
    1,384
    Likes Received:
    139
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  22. NY Musicologist

    NY Musicologist Career Changer
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2005
    Messages:
    281
    Likes Received:
    0
  23. Critical Mass

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2007
    Messages:
    1,713
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Having had this job, I can agree. The nursing staff is usually happy to see you, however, if you are the only one who can get a tough stick.

    I recommend the work for personal edification, but students should know that it's not the sort of thing that can make up for low numbers as far as adcoms are concerned.
     
  24. LabMonster

    LabMonster Clinically relevant.
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    Messages:
    1,384
    Likes Received:
    139
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I think everyone agrees on good numbers... However, I don't think anyone on SDN is qualified to make any statements about what an institution is looking for in it's next class.

    The fact is, we do not know. If phlebotomy gets you to patients, if you like being a CNA, or EMT, because of the job, then do it.

    Not everything needs to be done because it looks good on a CV.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  25. KELA

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2006
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I'm a CNA and I'm not a diaper-changer (although we usually call ourselves glorified *** wipers). It all depends on what kind of floor you're on. If you work on a post-op floor most of the patients are shipped off before they have a chance to poop and are cathed. Plus if you're like me and work nights a lot of times you get put in an individual assignment which gives you time to do your homework and leaves you responisble for all the patient cares for your patient.
     
  26. Vanguard23

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Messages:
    770
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Sorry for the late response, but I forgot about this thread.
    I read a book on the certification exam. I studied it during spring break of 05 while studying for an Org Chem and Chem 2 set of tests also...barely passed but I did.
    If you know basic algebra and can memorize a few other legal matters(like Federal and hospital laws) then you should be able to easily pass it.
    I'd recommend it or the phelobotomy job.
     
  27. weaselb

    weaselb Junior Member
    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2006
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    How does one get training to become a phlebotomist? Do you have to take courses and become certified or are there places that provide onsite training. From the research I've done, most are programs that take 3+ months part time and 1 month full-time plus an externship? Also, just curious, is the pay reasonable?
     
  28. Critical Mass

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2007
    Messages:
    1,713
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Definitely agree with your last two paragraphs.

    On the issue of SDNer's being qualified to know what an institution is looking for, current medical students can look around and see what they have in common as well as the classes above them and use that to model what adcoms must be looking for. They can also pose these questions to other current med students at other med schools on SDN and arrive at a consensus. They can furthermore talk to non-trads and other current healthcare professionals and see why they DIDN'T get in. This is the whole point of SDN IMO.

    Moving on to purely objective criteria, the MSAR won't lie to you. Numbers trump experience in most cases. Schools can't afford to enroll people whom they feel may not pass.

    BTW, I'm a med tech too. :thumbup:
     
  29. LabMonster

    LabMonster Clinically relevant.
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    Messages:
    1,384
    Likes Received:
    139
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Yep. I've also worked at places where they've trained on the job (though those are becoming rare.) I'm not 100% about the pay, I remember hearing complaining about ~12/hour (rural Wisconsin) but I'm sure it varies greatly with location and skill.

    Good luck.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  30. boarderdoc

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Hey all med techs, thanks for all the great work you do..

    However, I'd like to really push getting a job as an ER tech. It's kind of a jack of all trades position and you learn a ton about all the inner workings of a hospital. Most people can become a tech with just an EMT, but I'm not certified in anything besides the standard stuff the hospital teaches me (CPR, BCLS, etc). Here are the benefits of my job (granted I work at a Level I trauma center and believe I have the best job in the world before I go to med school):


    Work just about whenever I want & float to the ICU
    Lots of experience with resuscitations
    Phelbotomy
    EKGs
    Casting/Splinting
    Understand how all the equipment works and being the go-to guy for any failures
    Lots of procedures with Docs: ICP, thoracotomies, crics, spinal taps, bronchs, and the list goes on and on...
    Lots of teamwork with the nurses--so in the future you can actually understand how they think and appreciate their opinion (and nurses will let me do stuff the state doesn't permit me to do--NG tubes, IVs, push meds, foleys...)
    You can work all hours of the day and night and never cease to have fun.
    You learn something new EVERY day
    Work with all kinds of patients & talk to all kinds of worried family members--there's just nothing like helping a family laugh when their loved one is being intubated.
    Good pay
    Instant gratification.

    Plus you get a chance to see how doctors act at all times, not just when some premed is shadowing them and they have to act extra-professional. This is a really good place to get LOR. You do a good job, work hard, and don't goof off, they can't say anything bad about you. You don't even have to kiss up to them.

    Good luck, I hope you find what you're looking for.

    Oh, btw. I was an ER tech from my senior year in high school and I'm going to med school next year.



    -----------Officially in the Class of 2011--------------
     
  31. radiologydoctor

    radiologydoctor Membership Revoked
    Removed

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2007
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    For a college student, getting a job as a transporter is a good way to gain experience for what health care is like. You really won't learn much about the patients (as you shouldn't because of confidentiality), but what you will learn from being a transporter will help when you get to your clinicals because this transporter job can help you work on your people skills. You won't make much money doing this, but it is a good experience. I did transporter work for three years. No way would I have done that for a career, too hard on the body, but it was a good experience.
     

Share This Page