Hospitalist Job Search Adivce

nets445

Full Member
7+ Year Member
Apr 4, 2012
92
25
196
  1. Medical Student
I will be applying for hospitalist positions later this year and wondering what is the best way to approach this.

Questions:
1. Should I call/email the individual hospitals in my desired area and ask about position availabilities? Should I attach my CV onto these initial emails?
2. Should I use a recruiter or staffing agency to help me obtain a spot? From my understanding, the recruiter does not take any money from me, but gets money from the hospital if I agree to sign with the hospital. If using a recruiter does not cost me any money, is there any downside to using a recruiter or staffing agenct?
3. I am looking to work in small suburban hospitals. On their websites in the "for physicians" section, it appears that a lot of these hospitals use the aforementioned recruiters or staffing agencies to fill their positions. Does this mean that I absolutely have to apply through those agencies? Or can I just still call up the individual hospitals and inquire myself?
4. As a new graduate, is there any room for salary negotiation? I look great on paper. I graduated from Ivy league college, top tier medical school and residency (wanted to do GI at first but changed my mind halfway through residency). Does this matter at all for hospitalist salary?
5. If I plan on becoming a hospitalist for the long-run (i.e. at least for next 10 years), should I mention this during the interview process and ask for a higher base salary? The vast majority of co-residents who are applying to hospitalist positions are literally using it as a 1 or 2 year bridge between residency and fellowship and have no intention of doing it long-term. How can I use my long-term commitment to garner more salary. Perhaps have them give me a higher sign-on bonus spread throughout multiple years?
 

chessknt

Full Member
10+ Year Member
Oct 10, 2007
3,008
2,561
276
  1. Fellow [Any Field]
  2. Attending Physician
I will be applying for hospitalist positions later this year and wondering what is the best way to approach this.

Questions:
1. Should I call/email the individual hospitals in my desired area and ask about position availabilities? Should I attach my CV onto these initial emails?
2. Should I use a recruiter or staffing agency to help me obtain a spot? From my understanding, the recruiter does not take any money from me, but gets money from the hospital if I agree to sign with the hospital. If using a recruiter does not cost me any money, is there any downside to using a recruiter or staffing agenct?
3. I am looking to work in small suburban hospitals. On their websites in the "for physicians" section, it appears that a lot of these hospitals use the aforementioned recruiters or staffing agencies to fill their positions. Does this mean that I absolutely have to apply through those agencies? Or can I just still call up the individual hospitals and inquire myself?
4. As a new graduate, is there any room for salary negotiation? I look great on paper. I graduated from Ivy league college, top tier medical school and residency (wanted to do GI at first but changed my mind halfway through residency). Does this matter at all for hospitalist salary?
5. If I plan on becoming a hospitalist for the long-run (i.e. at least for next 10 years), should I mention this during the interview process and ask for a higher base salary? The vast majority of co-residents who are applying to hospitalist positions are literally using it as a 1 or 2 year bridge between residency and fellowship and have no intention of doing it long-term. How can I use my long-term commitment to garner more salary. Perhaps have them give me a higher sign-on bonus spread throughout multiple years?

1-yes. This is called a cold call and can be effective at findings jobs that aren't posted.

2-maybe, it depends on how much time you have and whether the hospital is using a recruiting agency. On general bigger hospitals have captive recruiter whole work directly for them to try to obtain candidates. Smaller hospitals might use staffing agencies instead. These individuals receive a rather large headhunting bonus for recruiting you that theoretically could (in part) be back on the the table as long as you go directly to them without ever speaking to the recruiter first.

3-see above

4-no that doesn't matter at all for salary in non academic settings. You can always negotiate for whatever you want however you have to be willing to love ok of they say no.

5-sign on and salary are different animals. It might help with sign on but probably won't do anything for salary
 
About the Ads
About the Ads
This thread is more than 1 year old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.