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How big of a difference can applying with a Gap year make? If I apply this upcoming year I would apply with a 3.7 Overall and a 3.6 Science with average extracurriculars. If I take a Gap year I'll have an extra year on all my extracurriculars as as well as hopefully a 3.7 science and a 3.8 overall. Can that make a huge difference?
 

starspells

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3.7/3.6s are solid stats. How are your ECs and MCAT? I would focus on those since your GPA is more than fine.
 

TheBiologist

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a 3.6/3.7 is not a low GPA, and depending on your major/classes you took and your MCAT that could give you a chance at some good schools.

any reason you think you are not a good enough applicant?
 

Catalystik

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How big of a difference can applying with a Gap year make? If I apply this upcoming year I would apply with a 3.7 Overall and a 3.6 Science with average extracurriculars. If I take a Gap year I'll have an extra year on all my extracurriculars as as well as hopefully a 3.7 science and a 3.8 overall. Can that make a huge difference?
We'd need to know your ECs with timeframes/ hours to answer the question.
 
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May 4, 2015
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Gap year is not for everyone and I refrain from giving advice to those that have above a 3.5 gpa and satisfactory components for the rest of an application. Some examples of those that choose to take a gap year despite the numbers checking out are:
1. Internationals that will obtain better status/ standing by extra years in either job or graduate work
2. Burnt out premeds that have a plan to spend their upcoming gap years in a no academic but service related fellowship that will allow them time out
3. Financially challenged applicants that need to gain footing for application expenses.

Please be mindful that gap years come with a risk too. Many ppl struggle to obtain employment even with degrees from top schools. You will not obtain guidance once out of school. The gap year where ppl are doing service work at machu pichu or posing with jungle elephants don't arrive without paying for these activities. Either that or well linked up ppl. So yes the gap year can go opposite way of what's expected and in many cases I suggest folks to keep cruising the traditional route.
 
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Lost in Translation

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Depends completely on what you do during that year (or 2 or 3 or 4 5 6 7 8).
 
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Goro

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Oh, only the difference between getting accepted and rejected, if you using that gap year to fill holes in your app. If your numbers hold up, you'll be going from ~ average to roughly > avg. But your GPAs are right now quite competitive.


How big of a difference can applying with a Gap year make? If I apply this upcoming year I would apply with a 3.7 Overall and a 3.6 Science with average extracurriculars. If I take a Gap year I'll have an extra year on all my extracurriculars as as well as hopefully a 3.7 science and a 3.8 overall. Can that make a huge difference?
 
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May 4, 2016
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For MCAT it's 513 and for extracurriculars this is what I have so far for the 15 spots on AMCAS. Another big problem is I have 3 C's in science courses and also don't really have the money to apply two years in a row if I don't get in the first year. If I plan on having a Gap Year I will most likely get a job for a year as well as continue my extracurriculars and try and fill up any gaps I have.


  1. Shadowing-All during Junior year 80 hours over 3 doctors
  2. Non Profit Volunteering for Kids with life threatening diseases(150 hours fresh-junior year)
  3. Student Government Leadership Position(Sophomore-Junior Year)
  4. Pre-Med Fraternity Non-Clinical Volunteering(180 hours Sophomore-Junior year)
  5. Volunteering at School Hospital(125 hours over Sophomore-Junior year)
  6. Research Volunteer in Neuroscience Lab(Sophomore-Junior year about 15 hours a week)
  7. religious student organization(Freshman-Junior year Leadership-historian- About 4 hours a week)
  8. 3 years leading a sports team I am extremely passionate about( Spend at least 15-20 hours a week just for this club and definitely one of my most memorable experiences)
  9. Volunteer in a homeless shelter(Only Junior year approx 80 hours)
  10. Volunteer at a Hospice(Only Junior year for approx 80-100 hours)
  11. Summer job between junior and senior year)
  12. Awards- Deans list and small related awards
 

gonnif

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It would seem you are a qualified candidate and can apply next cycle. The real advantage of continuing to do all your work in that glide year is that you will be well prepared if a reapplication is needed. Since only about 41% of applicants actually matriculate, continuing to prep for a reapplication while in an active application cycle is a prudent step
 
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Goro

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Will you just apply already? Your app is great!

Bump, any more insight. I really want to maximize my chances of getting in the first round I apply
 

Lucca

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There are many good reasons to take a gap year the way I see it. From the info in this thread, it seems that you are competitive enough to apply right away. If there are other things you would like to do before committing to medical school, then a gap year might still be the right option for you. If you are concerned about getting in the first time, then it's hard to say whether or not a gap year will significantly affect your chances since it looks like you have your bases covered already
 
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May 4, 2016
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There are many good reasons to take a gap year the way I see it. From the info in this thread, it seems that you are competitive enough to apply right away. If there are other things you would like to do before committing to medical school, then a gap year might still be the right option for you. If you are concerned about getting in the first time, then it's hard to say whether or not a gap year will significantly affect your chances since it looks like you have your bases covered already
Nothing in particular that I care to do. I was most likely just going to get a job/ fill in any gaps in my application and extracurriculars
 

Lucca

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Nothing in particular that I care to do. I was most likely just going to get a job/ fill in any gaps in my application and extracurriculars
Probably good to apply right away
 

Levrone

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A gap year can make a big difference. I'm a reapplicant with the same MCAT and GPA and had 2 MD II last year and currently have 4 MD II this year.
 

kingdomheart

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Your MCAT score is really high, you have an average GPA for medical schools (and its a good gpa), and standard ECs. Honestly you should just apply. You don't need a gap year to focus on anything. But it does depend, what type of MD schools are you looking to get into?
 

Levrone

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Did you happen to make any changes at all to your app?
Oh of course. That's why I feel a lot can change in a gap year. I added thousands of hours of clinical and non clinical experience
 

FutureOncologist

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Your medical career begins once you go to medical school orientation. If you feel like there are things you want to do before medical school, do it. Odds are, you won't have the time or money to do it until you're in your upper-30's/mid-40's.
 
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