Dismiss Notice
Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

How can one establish Texas residency?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by BlackPuma, Aug 28, 2001.

  1. How long is the requirement? time wise?

    1 year, 2 years? any additional help will be appreciated :D

    thank you so much
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Georgey

    Georgey Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2001
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just went through all this. Essentially, to establish TX residency, you must reside in the state of Texas for 12 consecutive months prior to YOUR APPLICATION being submitted and be gainfully employed during this time. All this is contigent on you not being claimed on anyone else's tax return as a dependent. If you were claimed as a dependent by your parents, then they are subject to the above regulations, and if they fulfill the reqs then you will be considered a resident. You can establish residnecy for tuition purposes even after you submit your application if you follow the above guidelines, BUT you will be considered a non-resident for admissions purposes. I had to wait two months until mid July to submit app because of all this nonsense. But hey, what was the point of applying if I didn't. Hope this helps.
     
  4. thank you so much!
     
  5. jbfuq

    jbfuq Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2001
    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    0
    Georgey is correct. the only exception i can think of is if you or your spouse (if you are married) are transfered for job or military reasons. then you will be considered a texas resident after one month. (i may be incorrect on the time frame here, but it is much less than the one year time frame).
     
  6. Hopkins2010

    Hopkins2010 Membership Revoked
    Removed

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 1999
    Messages:
    1,709
    Likes Received:
    1
    Let me clear up one thing. Georgey was technically correct but left out one very important detail.

    Not only must you live in Texas for 12 months prior and have a job, YOU CANNOT BE ATTENDING SCHOOL FULL TIME DURING THIS TIME PERIOD.

    I've been attending college in TX for 5 years, and I'm an independent student with a job. However, I have been attending full time schooling every year so that means I'm not considered a TX resident.

    Now, it turns out that these requirements are not state law. They are simply guidelines set down by the THECB (Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board). The schools themselves are free to follow these guidelines or not. For admissions purposes, all of the schools follow them. However, for tuition purposes, several of these schools DO NOT follow the THECB guidelines.

    For example, at UTMB and UTSW they will often give an out of stater who is admitted the same instate tuition as a TX resident, regardless of whether or not they have lived and worked in TX for 12 months prior to attending.
     
  7. geez that really confused me?

    I was an out of state resident for my state school, and after the first year, I began paying instate tuition...

    of course, my parents also moved to this new state and after the first year THEY became residents, and since I was an independent on them, I payed instate tuition! Of course, I also became a resident after one year in california...so i dont know if the same applies with texas? :confused:

    more confused....
     
  8. Hopkins2010

    Hopkins2010 Membership Revoked
    Removed

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 1999
    Messages:
    1,709
    Likes Received:
    1
    Provided that:

    1) Your parents move to TX

    2) Your parents become residents of TX at least 1 year before applying

    3) You are listed as a dependent of your parents

    THEN

    4) You are considered a TX resident.

    The earlier post only applies if your parents DO NOT move to TX, which is the situation for the vast number of people.
     
  9. Georgey

    Georgey Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2001
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    0
    Baylor is right. Sorry. That one must have slipped my mind. Yeah I had to drop from six credits to five when I took classes at UT as a postbacc student this past semester because anything more than five is considered at least half time status, and half time status renders all the other guidelines null and void. So just to correct Baylor, it is not full-time student status (12 credits or more), it is half-time status (6-11 credits) that disallows a person's Texas residency claims.
     
  10. ok so I am confused again :confused:

    as long as I hve a job, texas driver's liscence, and a student full time for 1 year, then I can apply for texas residency? :D
     
  11. SMW

    SMW Grand Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2001
    Messages:
    3,760
    Likes Received:
    1
    Sounds to me like you need to have a job, a TX driver's license, and NOT be a student for one year before you apply. Unless your parents have moved there, and you're dependant on them. In which case you could still be a student and be considered a TX resident. Right, Georgey and Baylor21? But what do I know? -- I'm an Alaskan! I must be crazy to be up this late trying to figure this out, when I still have to convince Alaska I'm a bona fide resident (which I am, but they like to make it difficult since money rides on it).
     
  12. Hopkins2010

    Hopkins2010 Membership Revoked
    Removed

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 1999
    Messages:
    1,709
    Likes Received:
    1
    Whatcha,

    Going by what you just said, you would only be considered a TX resident if you are attending school LESS THAN HALF TIME while living and working in TX for one year prior to applying. You dont specifically need a TX drivers license though, if you fit the other criteria.
     

Share This Page