How do i know if a German residency program is recognized in the US/any other country?

Amygdarya

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Yeah, to practice medicine in the US you have to go through an acceredited US residency. Can't speak for other countries, but the best source of information are their official physician licencing/credentialing bodies.
 

Mad Jack

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Yeah, to practice medicine in the US you have to go through an acceredited US residency. Can't speak for other countries, but the best source of information are their official physician licencing/credentialing bodies.
Not necessarily true- there are some reciprocity agreements in FM, psych, and anesthesia for those that are board certified in certain Commonwealth countries. Germany, however, has no such agreements to the best of my knowledge.
 

neusu

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What specialty? Getting a license in the US requires training (at least an internship) in the US, in most states. Establishing an office practice would not be terribly difficult thereafter. If you want to admit patients to a hospital or do surgery, on the other hand, getting credentialed may prove difficult. Your best bet is to complete training from an accredited US program.
 
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Not necessarily true- there are some reciprocity agreements in FM, psych, and anesthesia for those that are board certified in certain Commonwealth countries. Germany, however, has no such agreements to the best of my knowledge.
I am board certified in FM in Australia, what options do I have? Do I need to redo my residency?
 

Mad Jack

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I am board certified in FM in Australia, what options do I have? Do I need to redo my residency?
https://www.theabfm.org/moc/reciprocityagreements.aspx

By the sound of it, you'll need to take Step 1, Step 2, and Step 3, and have a valid medical license to practice. I don't know if this means you'll have to do an intern year or if it varies based on state law. You'll also have to have a visa.

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners
Physicians who are fellows of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners may apply to sit for the ABFM Family Medicine Certification Examination if they:

  • are members in good standing of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners;
  • have completed the Royal Australian College of General Practice Training Program;
  • reside in the United States;
  • hold a valid and unrestricted license to practice medicine in the United States; and,
  • are actively involved in Family Medicine in the United States.
 
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VA Hopeful Dr

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https://www.theabfm.org/moc/reciprocityagreements.aspx

By the sound of it, you'll need to take Step 1, Step 2, and Step 3, and have a valid medical license to practice. I don't know if this means you'll have to do an intern year or if it varies based on state law. You'll also have to have a visa.

Royal Australian College of General Practitioners
Physicians who are fellows of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners may apply to sit for the ABFM Family Medicine Certification Examination if they:

  • are members in good standing of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners;
  • have completed the Royal Australian College of General Practice Training Program;
  • reside in the United States;
  • hold a valid and unrestricted license to practice medicine in the United States; and,
  • are actively involved in Family Medicine in the United States.
So you have to pass all 3 Steps, pass the ABFM exam, and get a license.... so I looked up what foreign grads had to do to get a license. First, you have to have an ECFMG certificate (I think Caribbean grads can comment more on that). Second, either complete 3 years of a residency or be board certified in something. So basically, you have to have a license to sit the ABFM exam but to be allowed a license you have to have passed the exam...
 

Mad Jack

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So you have to pass all 3 Steps, pass the ABFM exam, and get a license.... so I looked up what foreign grads had to do to get a license. First, you have to have an ECFMG certificate (I think Caribbean grads can comment more on that). Second, either complete 3 years of a residency or be board certified in something. So basically, you have to have a license to sit the ABFM exam but to be allowed a license you have to have passed the exam...
I thought license requirements differ based on state- some require one year of training, others 2 or 3?
 
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JamaicanHerb

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Wow OP, looks like the people in this thread have done more effort using google in 10 minutes than you have done for yourself in 1 month of asking this question.
 
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Winged Scapula

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Thanks everyone, what's the difference between California Medical and California Osteopathic?

Also to have ACGME training means some I need sort of residency/fellowship program doesn't it? Fellowship programs normally require applicants to have board certification. In the end, it means one must complete at least some sort of residency in US despite reciprocity agreements. Is that correct?
 

akinetopsia

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Thanks everyone, what's the difference between California Medical and California Osteopathic?

Also to have ACGME training means some I need sort of residency/fellowship program doesn't it? Fellowship programs normally require applicants to have board certification. In the end, it means one must complete at least some sort of residency in US despite reciprocity agreements. Is that correct?
California Medical refers to graduates of M.D. programs (or foreign equivalent, e.g. MBBS/MbChB, etc). California Osteopathic refers to graduates of US D.O. programs.
 

Winged Scapula

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Thanks everyone, what's the difference between California Medical and California Osteopathic?

Also to have ACGME training means some I need sort of residency/fellowship program doesn't it? Fellowship programs normally require applicants to have board certification. In the end, it means one must complete at least some sort of residency in US despite reciprocity agreements. Is that correct?
Practically yes but technically there are some exceptions.

In most cases, to work in the United States, regardless of any reciprocity agreements by specialty boards, you must have a medical license which requires the completion of a US residency program.

However there are institutional or faculty medical licenses available in some states. For example, in Pennsylvania you can apply for an institutional medical license in which you are sponsored by an academic medical center to be on staff however this is limited to three years as I recall so is really designed for visiting professors.

Completing a medical fellowship in the United States used to be a way around this but that loophole is closing as more and more fellowships are requiring US graduate medical education prerequisites.

Reciprocity agreements between specialty boards are unrelated to The fact that you need a medical license to practice here.


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