1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Download free Tapatalk for iPhone or Tapatalk for Android for your phone and follow the SDN forums with push notifications.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

How do you know DO instead of MD?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by mtnbke, Sep 23, 2001.

  1. mtnbke

    mtnbke Junior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2001
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey DO hopefuls!

    How did everyone choose to pursue the DO instead of the MD? What were the qualities of the DO that most attracted you to those programs?

    I am really interested in a kind of survey to see how many people are applying to both DO and MD programs.

    How the heck does an applicant know what kind of doctor they want to be before they start the process?

    Confuso.
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Gauravvv

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2001
    Messages:
    638
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey,
    I originally started out wanting an MD and tried to get into accelerated programs. I found out about the DO program at NYIT quite a while after I had finished applications and also applied to that. I pretty much thought of the DO as a backup plan, but after I didn't get into the program that I wanted and did get in to the DO program, I began my research into the field of Osteopathy and it really intrigued me. So thats pretty much it and now I'm at NYIT getting ready for NYCOM, hope that helps! :D
     
  4. emedpa

    emedpa GlobalDoc
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2001
    Messages:
    6,014
    Likes Received:
    299
    Status:
    Post Doc
    As an older applicant(32),the D.O. option is more appealing to me because these programs tend to value life experience and prior medical background in addition to gpa and mcat's.They also don't place as much emphasis on where you did your prerequisites, as long as one does well. very few allopathic schools will consider classes taken at community college as equivalent to those taken elsewhere.
    Having worked in health care for 15 years, I have appreciated the interactions I have had with D.O's. I'm sure there are cranky D.O's out there, but I have yet to meet one(even when I call them at 3 in the morning for a consult). they are often more willing to talk to allied health care providers without condescending in the fashion of many M.D.'s.
    I also have had a number of mentors who are M.D.'s, but they are the exception and not the rule.
    The general rotating internship required of D.O.'s before attending a specialty program also appeals to me. D.O.'s also have a wider variety of residency opportunities because they can do an osteopathic or allopathic residency.hope that helps.-emed p.a. :D
     
  5. PimplePopperMD

    PimplePopperMD Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2000
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    1

    Interesting take.

    I find the misconception time and time again. People want to go to Osteopathic Medical School because "DOs interact with less of a condescending attitude." So you then believe that if you, yourself, become an MD, you will do the same. Something in our letters, or our education, teaches one to become a jerk?

    Oh, I love it... just LOVE it, when I hear "the DO treats the whole person, and the MD just treats the disease." Come on!

    "DOs are more compassionate." The schools actually TEACH COMPASSION, whereas the MD schools simply teach us to scream.

    "DOs have more residency opportunities." Well, they have DO and MD options. But they have to take both boards. And DOs must face a discriminating field, and are unable to practice abroad.

    "DOs are better physicians." That's as dumb as saying "MDs are better physicians." From what *I* see, there is ABSOLUTELY NO DIFFERENCE IN PRACTICE. None. Once a DO has a practice, it is the same as MD, with the exception for the small % of DOs who manipulate.

    I chose MD because:
    1) it was cheaper
    2) it is better recognized
    3) i'll have more career options.

    Period. Not because I'll become a better physician with an allopathic education, or that I'd have a worse education with DO, but ONLY the reasons outlined above.

    You'll find a lot of DOs justifying their "choice" to go to osteopathic school by saying that MDs are worse, etc. But the DOs that DON'T justify their decision using nonsense logic are the ones who truly think that their particular DO school is better, which may be the case for that individual. I personally don't believe that one is better or worse than another.

    Happy doctoring to all!
     
  6. Freeeedom!

    Freeeedom! Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2001
    Messages:
    698
    Likes Received:
    2
    Being a senior DO student, I have to agree with many points Pimple has to say.

    I do get tired of the endless bantor about "treating the whole patient" and all the PR the AOA uses.
    "More opportunities?" for DO residents...thats a laugh. It can truly be a fight to get an allopathic residency, but it IS done all the time. But if you want to be a Dermatologist at Stanford...you aint gettin it if you went to Pikeville or LECOM. That is the sad truth.
    I chose the DO path to learn more about manipulation and then learn to treat the patient with an additional tool...but let me tell you, after being $150K in the hole, not sure what residency I'll be in, and having to explain what the hell a DO is every 45 minutes...knowing "the Kirksville Crunch" doesn't seem all that valuable any more.
     
  7. yasostegirl3437

    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2001
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    I decided to pursue a career in osteopathic medicine because I want to become a family physician. D.O's are trained as primary care physicians first and specialist second. That is why there are so few osteopathic residencies for specialties other than family practice. Also, I hate research and have not desire to do any. Nor do I care to publish any papers. I am also really interested in OMT.

    Every since I was young, I wanted to become a doctor. Honestly, when I was seven, I really didn't know what a D.O or a M.D was. I just wanted to become a pediatrician. As I got older, I learned a doctor is a M.D.

    I had no idea that there were two types of physicians. I found out about osteopathic medicine junior year in college.I also found out about physician assistants, NP, occupational therapy and physicial therapy.

    I told friends about osteopathic medicine and they rejected it because D.Os are not widely recognized. I admit I was impressionable and left the D.O idea alone.

    Now that I am older, I realize what other people think are not important. I service over 300 docs in the NY area and many of them are D.Os. D.Os and M.Ds work together and there are D.Os in private practice.

    What is AOA doing about getting managed care companies to reimburse for omt?
     
  8. emedpa

    emedpa GlobalDoc
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2001
    Messages:
    6,014
    Likes Received:
    299
    Status:
    Post Doc
    It is my understanding that most allopathic residency programs consider comlex to be equal to usmle for purposes of application.am I correct in this assumption?
     
  9. melancholy

    melancholy 1K Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2000
    Messages:
    1,703
    Likes Received:
    65
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    Emedpa- I wonder if the term "equivalent" in regards to allopathic residency programs considering the USMLE and COMLEX in the same light may change depending on what point of view you are looking from. I do know that there are some DO's that will take both the COMLEX and the USMLE for different reasons and the intent is that performing well on the USMLE will serve as additional "confirmation" of the med student's performance on the allopathic board exam.

    After reading this thread, I can't comment on the demeanor of MD's vs. DO's... I know it depends on each doctor separately and not which degree the physician has. I did notice DO programs tend to mention a lot about caring for the entire patient and having more compassion towards patients. When I talk to my classmates at COMP though, I think the general consensus is that it is up to each of us to become the type of doctor we would like to be. I hope that goes for any med student anywhere in the world who will become a physician one day. Just like any other situation, it's what you make of the experience that matters the most.

    At any rate, success in career is dependent on what goals one has set for him/herself and hopefully the primary goal will mainly be geared towards care of the patient. At this point, I feel confident that COMP will help me to reach my goals as a future physician and that's what matters most to me.
     
  10. Gator

    Gator Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2001
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    Melancholy,
    I see that you are from Pomona, CA so you must be a Western/COMP student. I am interviewing there in a couple of weeks and I wanted to ask if you had any suggestions on how to get ready for the interviews. Thanks! :D
     
  11. Gator

    Gator Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2001
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    0
    Okay, I forgot that I had already asked you questions on the Western/COMP posts.
     

Share This Page