how do you prefer to organize drugs in a pharmacy?

Discussion in 'Pharmacy' started by museabuse, Nov 22, 2005.

  1. museabuse

    museabuse Senior Member
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    Just wondering what you guys prefer when it comes to organizing the drugs?

    -I have been in pharmacies where drugs are in alphabetical order by brand name with generic in the place where the brand would be.... for example tamoxifen would be under "N" for Nolvadex.


    - or in completely alphabetical order regardless of brand generic. Like Nolvadex would be under "N" and generic tamoxifen would be under "T".

    I prefer completely alphabetical order, its fast to find the drug your looking for.
    I can't think of any good reason to do it alphabetically by brand except that it helps you learn brand/generic.

    I can think of a con for brand/generic. Some generics have multiple brands and therefore the drug can be put in multiple places on the shelf and cause confusion. Also for me, total alphabetical order helps especially when you have floaters or new people because it is easy to find drugs. I know for me when it is organized brand generic I spend twice as long looking for where "ME" is on the shelf because I am seeing "T" and "L" and "N" next to each other and it plays mind games with my brain. Then when I see a "T" like tamoxifen I have to think oh that is "Nolvadex" and NO is after ME so I have gone to far and have to back track.

    Where if it was alphabetical order and I was looking for tamoxifen I would just follow the alphabet. Less stress on my brain. Maybe I am just stupid.

    The pharmacy I work at does completely alphabetical order but groups drugs into sub groups. Like eye drops in one section, ear drops in one section, liquids in one section, suspensions in one section, topicals in one sections, inhaltaions in one section, and capsules and tablets in one section but it is all in alphabetical order within each section.
    I am used to this organization and I like it.

    What are your thoughts on organizing drugs?
     
  2. bananaface

    bananaface Pharmacy Supernerd
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    generics by generic name, brands by brand name, BC stuff in it's own little section, liquids in their own section, and HIV meds in their own section (to make sure they don't short date since they are costly), and, of course, refrigeratables in the fridge :p

    I like fast moving stuff on a shelf directly overhanging the filling station, relatively alphabetical. I only worked one place that did this, but it saved a ton of time.
     
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  3. pharmagirl

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    The first pharmacy I worked in had generics on the shelf beside their name brand counterpart. I thought it was a nice system at the time because I really learned to associate generics quickly.

    The store I work at now has everything in alphabetical order. We do have a separate section for our Top 200 drugs that is closest to the area where we fill. This system seems to allow for new techs and floaters to navigate our shelves pretty well.
     
  4. All4MyDaughter

    All4MyDaughter SDN Mommystrator
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    I wish ours were completely alphabetical. It's alpha by brand except for certain things. Lisinopril is in the L's instead of the P or Z section for example. Synthroid is in the S section, while Levo and Levoxyl and in L. Armour Thyroid (so stinky!) is in the T section.

    We do have it organized with tabs and caps together, then powered suspensions, cremes/transderms, eye stuff, inhalers, then syrups. That much is nice.

    Our fast movers are in Baker cells right behind the counting area. I like that, except when the cell turns up empty right in the middle of a rush...
     
  5. ultracet

    ultracet 1K Member
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    ditto
     
  6. ndearwater

    ndearwater SDN Donor
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    I've worked in a few different Publix Pharmacies and the one I was at for the majority of my time was busy (for Publix) and had a large fast mover's shelf. I liked this because it saved tons of time! It also seperated BC, suspensions and liquids, eye drops, ear drops, cream/lotion/ointment, injections etc. I preferred it this way.
    The Publix I work at now does about half the volume and is even less than half the size. Therefore, there is a much smaller inventory. If we were to seperate every drug by route of administration there would be 10 tiny sections and it would probably take even longer to find! We have no fast movers and all types of drugs are in alphabetical order with one strange exception. The suspensions have a section and liquids have another section. In a pharmacy where you picky about seperating drugs due to space, it seems a narrow margin between the two. But whatever!
    I like having all drugs alphabetical (as opposed to brand with generics) especially when there are new people. One exception I remember was when we switched from Amoxicillin to Trimox (also a generic). When you would type in Amoxicillin (because often times we wouldn't type Amoxil b/c the generic is SOOO common) it would show that we had none in stock! This was confusing for about the first day or two until we realized we had Trimox. So temporarily we put Trimox in the A section until we got used to Trimox as the generic.
     
  7. All4MyDaughter

    All4MyDaughter SDN Mommystrator
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    I wanted to revive this thread because I'm now working in a pharmacy where it is straight ABC's.

    I don't like it that way 100% either.

    We don't have Baker Cells but we do have a fast mover section, which I don't like. Why? Because it is farther away than most of the other rows. Also, its hard to remember that the ONE strength of Warfarin (out of the many strengths) is in the fast movers. Same for Levo 100 mcg. It's in fast and every other one is in regular. One type of Advair is fast the others aren't. I could continue.

    I really liked having separate sections for birth control, topicals, suspensions, eye drops, nasal stuff, inhalers and liquids at my old store. I think if it were up to me, I have stuff divided that way but straight ABC order within the small sections.

    What do you think?
     
  8. dgroulx

    dgroulx Night Pharmacist
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    At Walgreens, the location prints on the label for you. It will say "Cell", if it's in the cells. "Fast" if it's a fast mover, etc. That saved time. We separated out the eye/ear/suspensions/solutions into their own section. For some reason, my store didn't separate out creams or birth control. I like those in their own section, too.
     
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  9. Moxxie

    Moxxie Rained out
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    At the CVS where I work, all the caps/tabs are alphabetical and there is a fast mover rack right next to the filling station. BC, vitamins and diabetic stuff is on one wall, while the back wall has all the syrups, ointments and creams. We separate the otics and optics too. A big chunk of the pharmacy is taken up by the scriptpro, the machine that fills the top200 (and jams every other hour).
     
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  10. kcjc

    kcjc Junior Member

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    We had everything in alphabetical order by brand name, with the generic product being to the left of the brand product. Ie... Need metformin, go to Glucophage. It was a good way to learn brand/generics...
    Also had most everything split into sections... eyes/ears/inhalers, then tabs/caps, antibiotics, liquids, BC, topicals, etc...
     
  11. Pilot

    Pilot Senior Member
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    I prefer that the drugs be organized in the same manner that patients describe them. For example, all the "little white pill"s for "blood" placed with all the other "little white pill"s intended for "stress", "muscle", and "infection".

    This would clearly prevent the patient from receiving a misfill and getting a "green capsule" for intended for "my mood" instead of her "blood" pill.
     
  12. ndearwater

    ndearwater SDN Donor
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    So I take it you left your store where you had that whole issue with the floater... good for you! No one needs to put up with that kind of faulty management. I hope you're happier at your new location!
     
  13. dgroulx

    dgroulx Night Pharmacist
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    Where do you put the drugs for multiple indications? She could be taking a beta-blocker for anxiety.
     
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  14. DrugDealer

    DrugDealer Senior Member
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    I think multiple indications would go in multiple locations.
     
  15. All4MyDaughter

    All4MyDaughter SDN Mommystrator
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    LOL don't forget the special section for "water" pills.
     
  16. All4MyDaughter

    All4MyDaughter SDN Mommystrator
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    No, I'm still at that store. That floater isn't coming back though. The store manager doesn't want him back in her store. Plus I don't think he wants to come back.

    When I originally posted in this thread, I was working at a different Kroger than the one I am now. I haven't switched lately, although I've floated to another store once or twice.
     

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