How does this work?

Discussion in 'General Residency Issues' started by tjmDO, Nov 3, 2002.

  1. tjmDO

    tjmDO Vascular Surgery Fellow

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    How does the ability to perform in medicine run? By that I mean can a surgeon be a FP, can an EM be a FP. I know that a FP can work in the ER so long as it is not level I. I am an MS-I and I am strongly considering surgery, but emergency medicine and even family practice have cool sides to them. I just want to get stuck in a one aspect job with no ability to change.

    Thanks
     
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  3. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
    Staff Member Administrator Physician Faculty Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved

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    While your medical license does enable you to practice MEDICINE and SURGERY, in general, most savvy consumers are now looking for those who are BE/BC in their respective, residency trained fields. In addition, most hospitals and other institutions won't hire someone without the appropriate training.

    Therefore, while a surgeon could technically practice FP, it isn't advisable in most cases without formal FP training, and vice versa. Working in the ER is a different matter - most ERs will hire locums in fill in the schedule, and you don't necessarily need to be EM residency trained to get the position, only licensed.

    Bottom line is that there really isn't any restriction to you, in your private practice after residency, from practicing a field you aren't residency trained in, but you would not be advised to do so and may have trouble getting reimbursed for procedures/practice you aren't really trained for. You won't likely get malpratice insurance for fields you aren't trained in/procedures you weren't trained in, and may open yourself up to litigation.
     
  4. Castro Viejo

    Castro Viejo Papa Clot Buster

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    You should also be advised that while with an MD you can practice both medicine and surgery and have a practice in areas in which you were not specifically trained (i.e., in which you did not complete a residency), you'll have mucho difficulty with a) finding an insurance company that will offer you malpractice and b) finding a health plan willing to list you as, for example, an FP working as a surgeon.

    Unfortunately litigation is something physicians always have to worry about, and even if your intellectual interests take you beyond your field of expertise, it's something you must shy away from without proper training.

    Good luck.
     

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