How easy is it to get hospitalist job in a big city as an FP resident?

peace321

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I am interested in being trained as an FP, however, want to work as a hospitalist for some time, but also want to live in an urban population (where there's a more diverse population base). The reason why I like the idea of the hospitalist is that you focus on more acute patients, however, I am also more attracted to the FP training (the fact that you see everything that comes in the door/peds/OB). The only thing is, as FP resident, I think you'll be competing with those IM residents who also want to be hospitalists. Will it be more difficult for me to obtain such a job in the city (like LA/bay area/west coast cities)? Or should I just go the IM route to be a hospitalist?

Thanks for your opinions!
 

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I am interested in being trained as an FP, however, want to work as a hospitalist for some time, but also want to live in an urban population (where there's a more diverse population base). The reason why I like the idea of the hospitalist is that you focus on more acute patients, however, I am also more attracted to the FP training (the fact that you see everything that comes in the door/peds/OB). The only thing is, as FP resident, I think you'll be competing with those IM residents who also want to be hospitalists. Will it be more difficult for me to obtain such a job in the city (like LA/bay area/west coast cities)? Or should I just go the IM route to be a hospitalist?

Thanks for your opinions!
either or, I have had job offers from big cities, as an FM graduate. IM residency is nice also, however I like the 'acute' urgent care setting also. You can do a mix, Urgent Care and Hospitalist.
 
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i think that's not a easy thing to do so.
 

cyahwheniseeyah

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I'd like to revive this thread, as I am dealing with the same proposed qusetion as OP. The only concern is I've been hearing talks that hospitals are becoming more picky about internists being hospitalist rather than Fp's. Can you guys let me know the trends you've been seeing, given this post is from orig. from 2009.

Also Peace321, what did you chose?
 
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I'd like to revive this thread, as I am dealing with the same proposed qusetion as OP. The only concern is I've been hearing talks that hospitals are becoming more picky about internists being hospitalist rather than Fp's. Can you guys let me know the trends you've been seeing, given this post is from orig. from 2009.

Also Peace321, what did you chose?
One thing I do is look at the physician job openings listed on hospital websites. I have seen a handful of hospitalist job openings requiring either FM or IM. So check the hospitals around your area of interest and see what they are listing.
 

brats800

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Getting a hospitalist job isn't bad. There are plenty of jobs out there. If you aren't yet in residency, look for residencies with strong inpatient rotations (ICU, etc) and/or fill your elective months with some extra inpatient work. I actually think Family Medicine can make you MORE competitive for a hospitalist job because you would also be able to admit / round on pediatric patients. The issue with being a hospitalist in a big city is just a salary question - salaries in bigger cities tend to be lower than in smaller cities (but this will be true if you were FP trained or IM trained).
 

cabinbuilder

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You can be a hospitalist as an FP - However, to be competitive in a saturated job market you may need to "prove" your worth and be able to show proficiency with central lines, cardiac stress tests, and vent management in ICU. This is where patient logs come in. I have gotten jobs like this as an FP due my careful records of what types of procedures and patients I have taken care of.
 
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You can be a hospitalist as an FP - However, to be competitive in a saturated job market you may need to "prove" your worth and be able to show proficiency with central lines, cardiac stress tests, and vent management in ICU. This is where patient logs come in. I have gotten jobs like this as an FP due my careful records of what types of procedures and patients I have taken care of.
In regards to patient logs, I know most programs have a web-based system to log... but sometimes I see residents carrying around a notebook with patient stickers in them and log manually. Is it just so they don't forget to log online or is there value of having your own notebook? I can't imagine it too professional to slam down a notebook of patient information when looking for a job.
 

cabinbuilder

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In regards to patient logs, I know most programs have a web-based system to log... but sometimes I see residents carrying around a notebook with patient stickers in them and log manually. Is it just so they don't forget to log online or is there value of having your own notebook? I can't imagine it too professional to slam down a notebook of patient information when looking for a job.

You misunderstand what I mean. Every where I travel I have a notebook that logs the info I need and then I put it into a spread sheet later. No patient names are ever on my logs

ICU
1/27/14 J.S. 43 M acute respiratory failure, Ps PNA, DMII, sepsis, ventilated 5 days. Central line placed. etc.

or if I do ER

K.M 12 F Burns to face, torso, neck from gasoline fire. Stablized and medevac to trauma center in Seattle.

I do the same for FP clinic, urgent care. I log all diagnosis and all procedures for every day and have for the past 5 years.



I just got a high paying locums ER fast track job because I had patient logs that proved I worked enough ER hours and saw enough patients in the last 2 years to be experienced enough where the employer felt I would be a good hire risk since the group is owned by ER doctors.
 
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You misunderstand what I mean. Every where I travel I have a notebook that logs the info I need and then I put it into a spread sheet later. No patient names are ever on my logs

ICU
1/27/14 J.S. 43 M acute respiratory failure, Ps PNA, DMII, sepsis, ventilated 5 days. Central line placed. etc.

or if I do ER

K.M 12 F Burns to face, torso, neck from gasoline fire. Stablized and medevac to trauma center in Seattle.

I do the same for FP clinic, urgent care. I log all diagnosis and all procedures for every day and have for the past 5 years.



I just got a high paying locums ER fast track job because I had patient logs that proved I worked enough ER hours and saw enough patients in the last 2 years to be experienced enough where the employer felt I would be a good hire risk since the group is owned by ER doctors.
Okay, I see. I was curious how you kept logs, since the way I have seen it done before with patient stickers made me nervous in regards to patient privacy. Thanks!
 
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I am interested in being trained as an FP, however, want to work as a hospitalist for some time, but also want to live in an urban population (where there's a more diverse population base). The reason why I like the idea of the hospitalist is that you focus on more acute patients, however, I am also more attracted to the FP training (the fact that you see everything that comes in the door/peds/OB). The only thing is, as FP resident, I think you'll be competing with those IM residents who also want to be hospitalists. Will it be more difficult for me to obtain such a job in the city (like LA/bay area/west coast cities)? Or should I just go the IM route to be a hospitalist?

Thanks for your opinions!

It is not very easy to get a position, in my humble experience, in the big city.

If you have a few years of experience, they will consider you, but you will still not be the equivalent of IM trained docs.

Sadly, many hospitals have it written in the by-laws that they only accept IM Physicians as hospitalists. I do not know the reason for this. I feel that there are strong FM inpatient residencies and weaker ones. I do feel the future of FM is outpatient AND inpatient AS WELL AS ER.

We are a versatile specialty. I would like to see residencies start to focus more on ICU/Inpatient/ER skills and LESS on obstetric skills that very few Family Physicians will ever use. I think that as times change, the residency training must also change in order to survive as a specialty.

You CAN find hospitalist spots in more rural areas an hour or two out of the city, particularly if they are hemorrhaging and in desperate need of docs. Cushier jobs are further out in the country, where there is unfortunately less specialist back up.
 

DIce3

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I actually think Family Medicine can make you MORE competitive for a hospitalist job because you would also be able to admit / round on pediatric patients
This statement is incorrect. In almost all cities, pediatric hospitalists will be favored over FPs. To a much lesser extent, in most but not all cities, internal medicine hospitalists will be favored over FPs.
 
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cabinbuilder

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It is not very easy to get a position, in my humble experience, in the big city.

If you have a few years of experience, they will consider you, but you will still not be the equivalent of IM trained docs.

Sadly, many hospitals have it written in the by-laws that they only accept IM Physicians as hospitalists. I do not know the reason for this. I feel that there are strong FM inpatient residencies and weaker ones. I do feel the future of FM is outpatient AND inpatient AS WELL AS ER.

We are a versatile specialty. I would like to see residencies start to focus more on ICU/Inpatient/ER skills and LESS on obstetric skills that very few Family Physicians will ever use. I think that as times change, the residency training must also change in order to survive as a specialty.

You CAN find hospitalist spots in more rural areas an hour or two out of the city, particularly if they are hemorrhaging and in desperate need of docs. Cushier jobs are further out in the country, where there is unfortunately less specialist back up.
Completely agree with the above. You can do hospitalist as FP but it is VERY DIFFICULT to get a perm position and be a large city. If your heart is set on that type of job that isn't rural then do yourself a favor and be IM.
 

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Completely agree with the above. You can do hospitalist as FP but it is VERY DIFFICULT to get a perm position and be a large city. If your heart is set on that type of job that isn't rural then do yourself a favor and be IM.
I disagree.

Maybe its my training? I did residency in the inner city, in a very large (16 floor) tertiary care hospital where FM had patients on almost every inpatient floor. I have had multiple ICU rotations, which we do with IM residents, and we managed our own "step down" ICU patients.

Maybe because of this I have recieved multiple offers to large city hospitals to become a hospitalist. At these hospitals I would basically function as an IM doctor (NO peds, NO OB). I just disliked "7 on, 7 off" so I did not end up taking the job.

I also recieved a job offer at a large city Catholic hospital - where I had done some rotations as a medical student - problem was my ex-wife was still working with them at the time as a PA sooooo.
 

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My experience currently, it has been difficult to get a locums job in a larger facility as FP even though I have the training. Of course every entity is different, politics are different and I do agree that it does come down to training and what you know how to do and your ability to prove that ability in order to be considered. I think it depends on the part of the country. I have tried in Denver and in Portland, OR to have my CV declined based solely on the fact I am FP even though I have tons of experience. There is NO WAY a blanket statement can be made. about how hard or easy it is to get the job. Location and politics play a huge factor. There is no absolute.
 

cyahwheniseeyah

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Hmm thanks for the great replies. Would it help to throw out a state. i.e. California or Oregon. Any experiences in how the Family Docs out here do in terms of hospitalist. I am okay living 20-30 minutes from the city. But an hour or two, is just a little too much for me. Been there done that, not my cup of tea.
 

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Review the SHM data. Currently about 4-5% of hospitalists are around the country are FP trained. It's not impossible, but certainly not ideal. In our group of 16 we have one FP.
 
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Hmm thanks for the great replies. Would it help to throw out a state. i.e. California or Oregon. Any experiences in how the Family Docs out here do in terms of hospitalist. I am okay living 20-30 minutes from the city. But an hour or two, is just a little too much for me. Been there done that, not my cup of tea.
How big is "a city" for you? Depending on where you grow up, the term can imply really different population sizes. Is 100,000 a city? 500,000? 1 million? 3 million? It might help you get responses - you don't want to be more than 20-30 minutes outside a city, but what that looks like for you I'm not sure.
 

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As someone who just interviewed in a major metropolitan area......here is what I took away from them.....
1. Traditional fam med is being phased out.....I was told to pick either hospitalist or only out patient...one or the other...I was told by CMO's at major metro hospitals where I interviewed that only " the old timers" round on their patients.....n if I wanted hospitalist.....that they might have something for me more rural like in Maryland......
2. The ABFM needs to address this issue so we can compete with our IM counterparts...
 

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As someone who just interviewed in a major metropolitan area......here is what I took away from them.....
1. Traditional fam med is being phased out.....I was told to pick either hospitalist or only out patient...one or the other...I was told by CMO's at major metro hospitals where I interviewed that only " the old timers" round on their patients.....n if I wanted hospitalist.....that they might have something for me more rural like in Maryland......
2. The ABFM needs to address this issue so we can compete with our IM counterparts...
You probably meant the AAFP, as the ABFM only deals with board certification.

Family medicine is a primary care specialty. Full-time hospitalists are not providing primary care, so don't expect a lot of support from the AAFP as far as that goes.

There are plenty of folks still providing hospital care for their patients, however. It just depends where you are geographically.
http://www.aafp.org/about/the-aafp/family-medicine-facts.html
 

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You probably meant the AAFP, as the ABFM only deals with board certification.

Family medicine is a primary care specialty. Full-time hospitalists are not providing primary care, so don't expect a lot of support from the AAFP as far as that goes.

There are plenty of folks still providing hospital care for their patients, however. It just depends where you are geographically.
http://www.aafp.org/about/the-aafp/family-medicine-facts.html
Although I don't use them, at my current gig I have admitting privileges that would allow me to do the traditional model. The hospital where my wife is going to work this fall has a few docs who still do both as well.
 

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I have privileges at two hospitals, and could do inpatient if I wanted to. I just don't want to.
 
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You probably meant the AAFP, as the ABFM only deals with board certification.

Family medicine is a primary care specialty. Full-time hospitalists are not providing primary care, so don't expect a lot of support from the AAFP as far as that goes.

There are plenty of folks still providing hospital care for their patients, however. It just depends where you are geographically.
http://www.aafp.org/about/the-aafp/family-medicine-facts.html
Very well stated. If you want the AAFP to address your skills pertaining to being a hospitalist, switch to IM. I have weak outpatient skills, but if I wanted to really learn and practice outpt medicine, I would have just done FP. There are no jack of all trades.
 

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Very well stated. If you want the AAFP to address your skills pertaining to being a hospitalist, switch to IM. I have weak outpatient skills, but if I wanted to really learn and practice outpt medicine, I would have just done FP. There are no jack of all trades.
I don't think you understood what BD was saying
 

Rocco Reed

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You probably meant the AAFP, as the ABFM only deals with board certification.

Family medicine is a primary care specialty. Full-time hospitalists are not providing primary care, so don't expect a lot of support from the AAFP as far as that goes.

There are plenty of folks still providing hospital care for their patients, however. It just depends where you are geographically.
http://www.aafp.org/about/the-aafp/family-medicine-facts.html
I see ur point.....but here is mine....and I'm trying to be as honest as possible here n wish not to offend anyone.....I had an unbelievable amount of training....I'm blessed to have gone through the residency I'm in right now here ...our programs pretty solid.......we have a tremendous amount of inpatient training....I feel pretty much comparable to my IM counterparts in our uni hospital.....I don't think they have one up on me because their IM n I'm FP. But one of the cool aspects that lured me into FP and what continues to be told to med students is that we can do anything.....hospitalist, work in an ER, have an OP clinic......but when I went out to interview in these major cities I was told things like
1. We don't want u doing OB
2. Pick OP or hospitalist, one or the other....not both
3. We only consider IM for hospitalist
4. We r phasing out traditional FP

Now I know people r gonna say its a geographical thing....But should it be really? I think as an FP grad from a solid program in a few months I'll be prepared to do any of these.....I'm already moonlighting in an ER n love it! But if I wanna work in a major city......good luck trying to get any shifts...

It was kinda discouraging
 

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I see ur point.....but here is mine....and I'm trying to be as honest as possible here n wish not to offend anyone.....I had an unbelievable amount of training....I'm blessed to have gone through the residency I'm in right now here ...our programs pretty solid.......we have a tremendous amount of inpatient training....I feel pretty much comparable to my IM counterparts in our uni hospital.....I don't think they have one up on me because their IM n I'm FP. But one of the cool aspects that lured me into FP and what continues to be told to med students is that we can do anything.....hospitalist, work in an ER, have an OP clinic......but when I went out to interview in these major cities I was told things like
1. We don't want u doing OB
2. Pick OP or hospitalist, one or the other....not both
3. We only consider IM for hospitalist
4. We r phasing out traditional FP

Now I know people r gonna say its a geographical thing....But should it be really? I think as an FP grad from a solid program in a few months I'll be prepared to do any of these.....I'm already moonlighting in an ER n love it! But if I wanna work in a major city......good luck trying to get any shifts...

It was kinda discouraging
A hospital system has absolutely no incentive to allow you to deliver babies or practice traditional FP. If you want to do those things, go into private practice.
 
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Blue Dog

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A hospital system has absolutely no incentive to allow you to deliver babies or practice traditional FP.
Correct. It rarely has anything to do with qualifications. Typically, it's institutional bias.

Fortunately, it's not universal. Seek out the places where full-spectrum FPs are already established. They're out there.
 

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I see ur point.....but here is mine....and I'm trying to be as honest as possible here n wish not to offend anyone.....I had an unbelievable amount of training....I'm blessed to have gone through the residency I'm in right now here ...our programs pretty solid.......we have a tremendous amount of inpatient training....I feel pretty much comparable to my IM counterparts in our uni hospital.....I don't think they have one up on me because their IM n I'm FP. But one of the cool aspects that lured me into FP and what continues to be told to med students is that we can do anything.....hospitalist, work in an ER, have an OP clinic......but when I went out to interview in these major cities I was told things like
1. We don't want u doing OB
2. Pick OP or hospitalist, one or the other....not both
3. We only consider IM for hospitalist
4. We r phasing out traditional FP

Now I know people r gonna say its a geographical thing....But should it be really? I think as an FP grad from a solid program in a few months I'll be prepared to do any of these.....I'm already moonlighting in an ER n love it! But if I wanna work in a major city......good luck trying to get any shifts...

It was kinda discouraging
Is it true that a lot of these full-spectrum opportunities are more available in small towns? I'm an MS2; by the I'm out practicing (if I do end up doing FM) are small towns still going to have these opportunities? Or are they going to end up being more like big cities? Will it still be possible to do outpatient FM while picking up ED shifts here and there and rounding on hospitalized patients, maybe doing OB, too?
 
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You misunderstand what I mean. Every where I travel I have a notebook that logs the info I need and then I put it into a spread sheet later. No patient names are ever on my logs

ICU
1/27/14 J.S. 43 M acute respiratory failure, Ps PNA, DMII, sepsis, ventilated 5 days. Central line placed. etc.

or if I do ER

K.M 12 F Burns to face, torso, neck from gasoline fire. Stablized and medevac to trauma center in Seattle.

I do the same for FP clinic, urgent care. I log all diagnosis and all procedures for every day and have for the past 5 years.



I just got a high paying locums ER fast track job because I had patient logs that proved I worked enough ER hours and saw enough patients in the last 2 years to be experienced enough where the employer felt I would be a good hire risk since the group is owned by ER doctors.
those places accept the plain logs, or do they have any kind of hospital seal or assurance that the logs are real?
 
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Very well stated. If you want the AAFP to address your skills pertaining to being a hospitalist, switch to IM. I have weak outpatient skills, but if I wanted to really learn and practice outpt medicine, I would have just done FP. There are no jack of all trades.
there are jack of all trades, where it makes more sense, outside metro areas.
 
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I see ur point.....but here is mine....and I'm trying to be as honest as possible here n wish not to offend anyone.....I had an unbelievable amount of training....I'm blessed to have gone through the residency I'm in right now here ...our programs pretty solid.......we have a tremendous amount of inpatient training....I feel pretty much comparable to my IM counterparts in our uni hospital.....I don't think they have one up on me because their IM n I'm FP. But one of the cool aspects that lured me into FP and what continues to be told to med students is that we can do anything.....hospitalist, work in an ER, have an OP clinic......but when I went out to interview in these major cities I was told things like
1. We don't want u doing OB
2. Pick OP or hospitalist, one or the other....not both
3. We only consider IM for hospitalist
4. We r phasing out traditional FP

Now I know people r gonna say its a geographical thing....But should it be really? I think as an FP grad from a solid program in a few months I'll be prepared to do any of these.....I'm already moonlighting in an ER n love it! But if I wanna work in a major city......good luck trying to get any shifts...

It was kinda discouraging
the problem is not being able to do those things, is doing all them at once. Employers have done the maths it is more profitable to have one person doing one job and other person doing another job.
 

cabinbuilder

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those places accept the plain logs, or do they have any kind of hospital seal or assurance that the logs are real?
They accept my spreadsheet logs that I keep. I have never had a problem. Plus all my dates match the dates I am at a locum site.


Date Initials Age Sex (M/F) Diagnosis Procedure
12/2/2013 J.M. 59 yr. M Rt. Groin suture removal suture removal 5 sutures
12/2/2013 C.G. 33 yr. F Back pain, somatic dysfxn C,T,L,S ribs, rt shoulder OMT HVLA C,T,L,S ME Rt shoulder, ribs
12/2/2013 P.D. 15 yr. M Seizure disorder: Not therapeutic on meds vs med S/E
12/2/2013 M.R-B 42 yr. F Exudative pharyngitis
12/2/2013 J.C-A. 44 yr. M Strep pharyngitis, Back Pain, Somatic dysfxn C,T,L OMT HVLA C,T,L
12/2/2013 K.N. 45 yr. M Lumbar DJD, chronic back pain, Lt. middle finger fx, bronchitis, Otitis media new brace to finger
12/2/2013 V.N-G 40 yr. F vertigo, Back pain, Somatic dysfxn OA,AA, C,T spine OMT HVLA OA, AA, C,T spine
12/2/2013 R.A-T. 37 yr. F Neck pain, somatic dyfxn C spine OMT C-spine
12/2/2013 M.V-N. 35 yr. F rectal bleeding, Int/Ext hemorrhoids
12/2/2013 S-M.M. 65 yr. F Prolapsed bladder, Incontiance, bladder pain Pesary removal, foley catheter placement
12/2/2013 K-E.A. 7 yr. F pharyngitis, fever
12/2/2013 J.A. 8 yr. M pharyngitis, fever
12/3/2013 J.G-O. 59 yr. M Lt. forehead lesion Lesion removal, 6 sutures placed
12/3/2013 M.B-L. 6 yr. F Bronchitis, asthma, cough
12/3/2013 L.F-L. 32 yr. F Back pain, Somatic dysfxn C,T,L Rt piriformis, Left hip, pubes OMT HVLA to C,T,L ME to pubes, lt hip, Rt piriformis
12/3/2013 J.E-S. 67 yr. M Lt Leg suture removal Suture removal 5 sutures, steri strips placed
12/3/2013 G.S. 65 yr. M Bronchitis, cough, Rt eye pterygium, Tob use
12/3/2013 L.M-J. 28 yr. F N/v of pregnancy
12/3/2013 S.B-S. 6 yr. F Gastroenteritis
12/3/2013 D-P.V-G. 8 mo. F B/L otitis media, viral xanthum, fever
12/3/2013 J.L-S. 16 yr. F Rt great toe ingrown nail Ingrown nail removal 6 cc 0.5% marcaine nerve block
12/4/2013 J.T. 14 mo. F Rt Otitis media, mucopurulent rhinitis, seasonal allergies
12/4/2013 M.S. 37 yr. F Headache, somatic dysfxn of C,T OMT HVLA to C,T spine
12/4/2013 A.G-G. 44 yr. F Neck pain, somatic dyfxn C spine OMT HVLA to C spine
12/4/2013 D.J-D. 15 yr. F RUQ abdominal pain - GB vs constipation
12/4/2013 M.A. 37 yr. F Back pain, neck pain, somatic dysfxn C,T spine OMT HVLA to C,T spine
12/4/2013 M-L.E. 56 yr. F Rt Torn cartilage to ribs, neck pain, back pain, somatic dysfxn C,T spoine OMT HVLA to C,T spine
12/4/2013 D.A. 3 mo. F eczema
12/4/2013 J.P. 10 yr. M Rt wrist sprain
12/5/2013 E.C. 19 yr. F Lt ankle sprain crutches, brace
12/5/2013 B.L-F. 2 yr. M Foreskin irritation, diaper rash
12/5/2013 M.H-H. 39 yr. F LLQ pelvic pain - likely ovarian cyst
12/5/2013 Y.H-L. 23 yr. F asthma exac., bronchitis, URI, eczema flare
12/5/2013 J.A. 36 yr. F Lt rib costochondritis, torn rib cartilidge, back pain somatic dysfxn T spine OMT HVLA to T spine
12/5/2013 C-L.S 53 yr. F Cholecystits, DMII
12/5/2013 M.R-G. 19 mo. M B/L Otitis Media, URI, seasonal allergy
12/5/2013 G.G. 44 yr. F Rt Axillary abcess, cellulitis axilla and rt breast I&D axillary abscess
12/5/2013 J.W. 25 yr. F Pregnancy induced back pain, somatic dysfxn C,T,L spine OMT HVLA C,T,L spine
12/5/2013 U.M-M. 59 yr. M Rt. Achilles tendonitis
12/5/2013 L.E. 63 yr. F Shoulder pain Injection 5cc 0.5% marcaine
12/5/2013 E.C. 13 yr. M Epistaxis, B/L otitis media
12/5/2013 M.F. 20 yr. F Pharyngitis, allergic conjuncitvitis
12/6/2013 G.G. 44 yr. F Axilla abscess wound check and repack Abscess repacked
12/6/2013 J.J-L. 21 mo. M Cough, fever, vomiting/diarrhea, bone pain, esophageal pain for 6 months. To ER
12/6/2013 L-R.G-L. 34 yr. M Eczema
12/6/2013 E.F. 37 yr. F Back pain, somatic dysfxn C,T,L,S spine OMT HVLA C,T,L,S
12/9/2013 M.L-V. 3 yr. M Allergic reaction to antibiotic
12/9/2013 M-D-S.B-G. 46 yr. F Back pain, somatic dysfxn T spine, Rt post radial head, Rt lateral epicondylitis OMT HVLA to T spine, rt radius
12/9/2013 A-B.V-L. 9 yr. F Strep pharyngitis, B/L otitis media, vomiting
12/9/2013 E.G-M. 6 yr. F Allergic conjunctivitis, seasonal allergy, rt subconjunctival hemorrhage
12/9/2013 M.A. 16 yr. F Headache, somatic dysfxn C-spine, serious otitis media, insomnia OMT HVLA C spine
12/9/2013 L.R. 49 yr. F B/P check, numb, lots of stress
12/9/2013 M.A-L. 14 yr. F conjunctivitis, viral pharyngitis, contact dermatitis to face
12/9/2013 E-Y.R. 29 yr. F abdominal pain: pancreatitis vs ulcer , serous otitis media, vertigo
12/9/2013 X.M-J. 3 yr. F Lt otitis media, URI, cough
12/9/2013 G.G. 44 yr. F Wound check rt axillary LAD, contact dermatitis, rt axilla abscess
12/9/2013 L.M-A. 37 yr. F Lt otitis media, Rt Serous otitis, pharyngitis, cerumen impaction, flu shot
12/9/2013 M-E.G-P. 42 yr. F Neck pain, muscle spasms, somatic dysfxn OMT HVLA C,T spine
12/9/2013 E.V-D-O. 68 yr. F Lichen sclerosis et atrophicus, stress incontinance, dysuria, vulva pruritis
12/9/2013 I.Z. 35 yr. F Environmental allergies with chronic cough
12/9/2013 L.A-L. 2 yr. M Contact dermatitis urethra and glans
12/9/2013 A.S. 31 yr. F Lt leg pain, Achilles tendonitis
12/9/2013 F.R. 31 yr. M Lip warts, cryotherapy to lip warts, wart excision with nitro stick
12/10/2013 M-D-S.B-G. 46 yr. F Rt Lateral epicondylitis 1cc kenaleg, 2cc + 0.5% marcaine injection
12/10/2013 R.C-S. 43 yr. M Triglyceridemia, Lt cerumen impaction, vertigo, isolated diastolic HTN
12/10/2013 S.G-R. 47 yr. F Viral bronchitis, cough, myalgias, sinusitis
12/10/2013 A.C-A. 23 yr. M Lt dental facial abscess, face pain
12/10/2013 E.O. 17 yr. F URI, allergic conjunctivitis, contraception flu shot
12/10/2013 A.W. 32 yr. F Back pain, neck pain, somatic dysfxn C,T,L spine OMT HVLA C,T,L spine
12/10/2013 J.G-O. 59 yr. M Lt forehead suture removal 5 sutures
12/10/2013 E.T-S. 27 yr. F RUQ abdominal pain - GB vs GERD
12/10/2013 R.A. 39 yr. F Varicose veins ASA 325mg/day
12/10/2013 B.T. 12 yr. M Rt Subareolar breast mass tender, US breast Rt.
12/10/2013 J.M. 17 yr. M seasonal allergies, asthma with poor control
12/10/2013 B.S-S. 39 yr. M H.Pylori infection, abdominal pain
12/11/2013 J.V. 33 yr. F Lt ovarian cyst, GERD
12/11/2013 D.G-M. 10 yr. M Bronchitis, cough, fever
12/11/2013 P.M. 51 yr. F DUB, grief reaction
12/11/2013 Z.A. 50 yr. F PAP, general health
12/11/2013 F.A. 52 yr. F Rt Shoulder tendonitis, rt shoulder pain
12/11/2013 M.G. 74 yr. F Back pain, Somatic dysfxn T,L spine, Rt hip OMT HVLA T,L spine, ME Rt hip
12/11/2013 E.G. 44 yr. M Back pain - chronic, cervical radiculopathy, L-spine spondylolisthesis, SE neurontin
12/11/2013 M.P-H. 56 yr. F Bronchitis, cough
12/11/2013 D.B. 19 yr. F Ovarian cysts
12/11/2013 M.M-G. 41 yr. F Chronic vaginal candida infection
12/11/2013 E.L-H. 53 yr. F Bronchitis, cough, flu, fever, myalgia
12/11/2013 M.P. 46 yr. F LLQ pelvic pain, microscopic hematuria, Insomnia
12/11/2013 C.A-R. 3 yr. F B/L otitis media, fever, pharyngitis, cough, myalgias
12/11/2013 A.K-A. 12 yr. M Rt otitis media, serous otitis, URI
12/12/2013 G.E. 50 yr. M Thoracic radiculopathy, lumbar radiculopathy, neuroma in Rt foot, Reynauds
12/12/2013 C.J-M. 39 yr. F WWE - PAP, candida vaginitis
12/12/2013 B.M. 31 yr. M Physical for Special Olympics, ear lavage, flu shot
12/12/2013 Y.M-A. 27 yr. F Strep pharyngitis, serous otitis media
12/12/2013 D.J. 76 yr. F BP check
12/12/2013 Y.B-S. 56 yr. M BP check, medication adjustment
12/12/2013 S.E. 61 yr. F Back pain, neck pain 60 mg toradol
12/12/2013 C.V-M. 35 yr. F WWE-PAP
12/12/2013 R.H-M. 38 yr. F WWE PAP, asthma
12/12/2013 A.G-U. 32 yr. F WWE-PAP, Vaginal infection ?BV
12/13/2013 M.B. 58 yr. M Tendonitis - fibularis tendon
12/13/2013 S.B-H. 17 yr. F Serous otitis media, URI, otalgia
12/13/2013 J.D-R. 8 yr. F URI, cough, eczema, pruritus
12/13/2013 E.P-B. 7 yr. M Well child visit, counselling appt
12/13/2013 J.S-A. 38 yr. M Lt sciatica, back pain, s/p MVA OMT attempted without success.
12/16/2013 T.P. 28 yr. F Numb feet, hands, DJD, bulging discs Toradol 60 mg.
12/16/2013 H.C-C 39 yr. F UTI 500 mg. 5 days
12/16/2013 I.L-N. 51 yr. F Candida to groin 2nd to Mexico abx
12/16/2013 V.M. 15 yr. F Eczema
12/16/2013 G.O-C. 6 yr. M URI, B/L cerumen impaction, fever, cough Ear Lavage
12/16/2013 O.C-R. 34 yr. F UTI, HA, URI
12/16/2013 S.H. 33 yr. M Back pain, radiculopathy
12/16/2013 M.B. 17 yr. F Back pain, Somatic dysfxn C,T,L spine OMT HVLA C,T,L spine
12/16/2013 E.Y-R. 29 yr. F RUQ pain ?Gallstones
12/17/2013 D.L-L. 5 yr. M Facial eczema
12/17/2013 G.V. 2 yr. M Oral thrush, B/L otitis, keratitis pilaris, eczema to cheeks
12/17/2013 A.C. 23 yr. F Rt Elbow pain/sprain, severe eczema to hands Brace
12/17/2013 J.V-P. 41 yr. M Contact dermatitis eyelids
12/17/2013 J-X.G-D. 6 yr. M Night time enuresis, premature, n/o penis infections
12/17/2013 Y.A-H. 17 mo. F B/L otitis media, URI 400mg/5u 1 1/4
12/17/2013 J.A. 37 yr. F Irritable Bowel, costochondritis
12/17/2013 E.V. 27 yr. F Food Poisoning, vomiting, diarrhea BRATTY
12/17/2013 J.R-C. 39 yr. M Rt. Knee medial tendonitis at insertion of sartorius 2cc 0.5% marcaine, 1cc kenalog Rt. Knee
12/17/2013 A.P. 2 yr. M Otitis Media, diarrhea, seasonal allergies
12/18/2013 T.B-P. 3 yr. F Otitis media, conjunctivitis, cerumen impaction Ear Lavage
12/18/2013 M.M. 48 yr. M DKA - sent to ER
12/18/2013 S.B-P. 7 yr. F B/L Otitis Media, B/L Conjunctivitis
12/18/2013 E.O-J. 34 yr. F Back Pain, Somatic dysfxn C,T,L spine HVLA OMT C,T,L spine
12/18/2013 B.W. 49 yr. M Rt Hip Bursitis, Rt Sacral Trigger point 3cc. 0.5% Marcaine injected into right hip bursa
12/18/2013 S.H. 33 yr. M Back Pain f/u MRI MRI
 
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