RBC

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Overall GPA (3.4)

Freshman year - 2.568 (26 credits)
Sophomore year - 3.125 (24 credits)
Junior year - 3.344 (29 credits)
Senior year - 4.000 (50 credits..includes some post-bacc classes)

Freshman year - 2.568 w/ 26 credits
Sophomore --> Senior year - 3.611 w/ 103 credits

Science GPA (3.2)

Freshman year - 2.176 (17 credits)
Sophomore year - 2.727 (11 credits)
Junior year - 3.315 (22 credits)
Senior year - 4.000 (25 credits)

Freshman year - 2.176 w/ 17 credits
Sophomore year --> Senior year - 3.500 w/ 58 credits


My MCAT is a 31Q (11 BS / 9 VR / 11 PS).

300+ hours in the ER (50+ as volunteer, 250+ as physician's scribe taking HPI's).

Also have work experience, dean's list, some community service, clubs, etc.

My resident state is Louisiana, and I would love nothing more than to get into LSU-NO or Shreveport.

Any comments or advice would be welcomed. Thanks.
 
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Nov 9, 2009
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So what is your overall GPA and Science GPA for all the years put together, without counting the post bacc class (they dont count in undergrad GPA)
 

RBC

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So what is your overall GPA and Science GPA for all the years put together, without counting the post bacc class (they dont count in undergrad GPA)
Huh? I've been told that they do, by numerous individuals...
 
Sep 4, 2006
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Some schools give less weight to the freshman year, the rest are willing to forgive a bad first year, but still expect you to redeem your GPAs. Everyone gives credit for an upward GPA trend.

My rough figures suggest your overall GPA will be ~3.4 with BCPM ~about 3.2? Your cGPA is on the low side for both schools (medians 3.7 and 3.6) with your BCPM being at the bottom 10th percentile. But your MCAT score is stronger than the medians by three points. If your BCPM were stronger, I'd say you have a decent chance.

You could spend a year taking/retaking more science classes to improve your odds of an acceptance. Or you could go ahead and apply and see what happens, perhaps applying to some DO med schools too to have a better chance of getting in somewhere.

Are there any significant factors that lead to the low science grades those first two years?
 
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STAT EKG

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I had a much worse first year than you (resulted in academic suspension :eek:) and two state schools were able to look past it (*to a degree; no rejections and two waitlists) because I consistently maintained a 3.7 or better every year following that.

With this said, I'd much rather be in a position where I never screwed up academically because any blemish on your record is going to hurt you to some degree with the process being so competitive.

You're still definitely in the running though (better spot than me)... apply broadly.

Oh, and yeah... the post bacc classes aren't going to count toward your cGPA.
 

RBC

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Oh, and yeah... the post bacc classes aren't going to count toward your cGPA.
I am definitely confused then. All I hear on SDN is that if you have a low undergrad GPA, bring it up with post-bacc work, which is essentially a continuation of undergraduate coursework even though you've already obtained a degree.

I obtained my BS in Fall of 2009. This semester, I'm taking more undergraduate courses, and never applied or entered into a formal graduate program.

Are these courses not going to influence my undergraduate GPA?
 

STAT EKG

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I am definitely confused then. All I hear on SDN is that if you have a low undergrad GPA, bring it up with post-bacc work, which is essentially a continuation of undergraduate coursework even though you've already obtained a degree.

I obtained my BS in Fall of 2009. This semester, I'm taking more undergraduate courses, and never applied or entered into a formal graduate program.

Are these courses not going to influence my undergraduate GPA?
They won't influence your UG GPA at all. It sucks, I know. You'd have been better off just not graduating and taking the classes as an undergrad during a fifth year.
 

STAT EKG

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As an addendum, they *will* look at your post-bacc work and take that into account (which is why people recommend post-bacc work to people with low undergraduate GPAs so often), but it won't numerically affect your undergrad GPA and it's definitely not weighed as heavily as your undergrad GPA, unless it's an SMP... which are supposed to be weighed similarly to your undergrad.
 

RBC

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As an addendum, they *will* look at your post-bacc work and take that into account (which is why people recommend post-bacc work to people with low undergraduate GPAs so often), but it won't numerically affect your undergrad GPA and it's definitely not weighed as heavily as your undergrad GPA, unless it's an SMP... which are supposed to be weighed similarly to your undergrad.
What about this thread? - http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=701169&highlight=post+bacc

Just one of the many threads I've come across mentioning a post bacc to raise the undergraduate GPA.

Are they all wrong?
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

Osteo Dullahan
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Post-bacc classes do count for ugpa. Rule of thumb OP if Cat says sometime she's likely correct ;).
Anyways, I'd say that you've got a really good upwards trend. However I'd still apply to a few DO schools to be safe.
 
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Drrrrrr. Celty

Osteo Dullahan
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As an addendum, they *will* look at your post-bacc work and take that into account (which is why people recommend post-bacc work to people with low undergraduate GPAs so often), but it won't numerically affect your undergrad GPA and it's definitely not weighed as heavily as your undergrad GPA, unless it's an SMP... which are supposed to be weighed similarly to your undergrad.
I'm going to just say that everything you said here is incorrect in someway or form. SMP's do not average with UGPA ( they are a totally different entity of which was developed to eliminate your ugpa history), post-bacc's do affect your ugpa, and it weights like a class you took in undergrad.
 
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See page 9 of the AMCAS 2009 Instructional Manual at: http://www.aamc.org/students/amcas/amcas2009instructionmanual072808.pdf

Extracted below with bolding mine.

 AMCAS counts all "+" or "-" grades, even if your school does
not. At some schools, a "+" or a "-" counts as n.3 or n.7, at
others they count as n.5.


AMCAS counts all attempts of a repeated course, even if your
school does not.



Grades of "IF" or unauthorized/unofficial/administrative
withdrawal may be treated as "F" in the GPA depending on how
they are considered by your school.



Postbaccalaureate Coursework is included in the "Undergraduate
Total" GPA as well as in a separate "Postbaccalaureate" GPA.



Grades and credit hours for all failed courses will be included in
the AMCAS GPA, even if they are not included in the GPA
calculations of the transcript-issuing institution.

 

ThaliaNox

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Just to reiterate this again, post-bac work DOES count towards your undergrad GPA. It also shows up separately, just like every individual year and classes taken in high school.

Honestly though, OP, while you show a strong effort in the last couple years, the three years before that were all rather poor. I wouldn't expect as much of an upward trend benefit as others might get, although some leeway may be given. However, since you are a LA student, I can see you getting into at least one of your state schools.
 
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I also have a question on upward trend. Im a CA resident here were my stats (UC BERKELEY)

FR: 3.44
Soph: 3.5
Jr. 3.65

Overall 3.52 and BCPM= 3.47

Chance me (US MD schools)
 

robflanker

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As mentioned, it does count. It does not change GPA you earned to get your GPA obviously but it does affect the AMCAS-calculated GPA.

Nephrology - start your own thread, and you have no MCAT nor disuss any ECs; make a new thread with these and go from there. But don't plan on going to med school in cali with a 3.52