TakotsuboOkazaki

2+ Year Member
Dec 4, 2016
304
494
Laniakea Supercluster
Status
  1. Medical Student
what's integrated?

Integrated residency programs (vascular, plastics, I6 cardiothoracic)

Basically less gen surg training and no board certification in gen surg in exchange for shorter training and more focus on what you want. Very attractive with GS programs having 1-2 lab years.

Remember every year you delay attending-hood is $300-500K less life-time earnings if you have a fixed retirement age.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Jun 13, 2015
65
7
Status
  1. Pre-Medical
Thanks for everyone's posts. I think my only concern is about my back. I have a severe degenerative lumbar spinal condition so I'm not sure that any specialties but pathology, radiology, or psychiatry are doable for me. I'm only 27 but I do have a fair degree of discomfort and pain from time to time already. Certainly nothing surgical is in the cards for me. Eventually, I may need to have a spinal fusion surgery but I don't know to what degree of disability I may have from that, if any at all. I think I'll ask my spine surgeon what he thinks as far as careers go. Would it be realistic to go into medicine even with my back problems? I think being a psychiatrist would be very rewarding especially as that's what inspired me to consider medicine in the first place. But... I know that residency spots for psychiatry are getting harder to get.
 
Jun 13, 2015
65
7
Status
  1. Pre-Medical
Thanks for everyone's posts. I think my only concern is about my back. I have a severe degenerative lumbar spinal condition so I'm not sure that any specialties but pathology, radiology, or psychiatry are doable for me. I'm only 27 but I do have a fair degree of discomfort and pain from time to time already. Certainly nothing surgical is in the cards for me. Eventually, I may need to have a spinal fusion surgery but I don't know to what degree of disability I may have from that, if any at all. I think I'll ask my spine surgeon what he thinks as far as careers go. Would it be realistic to go into medicine even with my back problems? I think being a psychiatrist would be very rewarding especially as that's what inspired me to consider medicine in the first place. But... I know that residency spots for psychiatry are getting harder to get.
I guess my fear is that I go to medical school but would be unable to actually practice if I find out I hate the sedentary specialties or would be unable to match into them.
 
About the Ads
Nov 15, 2019
36
65
Status
  1. Medical Student
Thanks for everyone's posts. I think my only concern is about my back. I have a severe degenerative lumbar spinal condition so I'm not sure that any specialties but pathology, radiology, or psychiatry are doable for me. I'm only 27 but I do have a fair degree of discomfort and pain from time to time already. Certainly nothing surgical is in the cards for me. Eventually, I may need to have a spinal fusion surgery but I don't know to what degree of disability I may have from that, if any at all. I think I'll ask my spine surgeon what he thinks as far as careers go. Would it be realistic to go into medicine even with my back problems? I think being a psychiatrist would be very rewarding especially as that's what inspired me to consider medicine in the first place. But... I know that residency spots for psychiatry are getting harder to get.

Technical standards for my school:

Motor-Function: Candidates, after appropriate training, must possess the capacity to perform physical examinations and diagnostics maneuvers. Candidates are required to respond to clinical situations in a timely and efficient manner while providing general and emergency care. These activities require some physical mobility, coordination of both gross and fine motor neuromuscular functions, and balance and equilibrium.
 

slowthai

holding a barbell.
7+ Year Member
Jul 11, 2013
1,877
4,339
In my gaff
what's integrated?

Integrated refers to the integrated pathway to a specialty, like integrated plastic surgery, integrated cardiothoracic surgery, or integrated vascular surgery. The traditional pathway for these fields is 5-7 years of general surgery residency + 2-3 years of subspecialty fellowship. The integrated pathways vary in the amount of general surgery time, but I believe more time is spent in the surgical subspecialty. So it's 6 years total for plastics, 6 years for cardiothoracic, and 5 years for vascular. It's considerably more competitive to match into these integrated spots straight out of med school, as there are so few spots available. I will say that in at least one of these specialties (plastics), the traditional pathway is getting phased out, so that route is becoming more competitive as well.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

xffan624

7+ Year Member
Jan 6, 2013
1,881
2,144
Status
  1. Resident [Any Field]
What residency are you in? I have back problems so I can't do any specialties that require a lot of time on your feet.

Besides the surgical ones and probably ob-gyn, none will require you to be primarily on your feet, but there are rounds for IM, peds, and FM (during inpatient months). If they are bedside rounds then you will be standing for a couple hours. The difference is I felt as as resident more comfortable just taking a rolling chair with me if it was a bad day for my knees. Also unlike in medical school instead of shadowing in some subspecialty clinic and standing during the patient encounters because there's only two chairs (or more, but family present) you will be the one interviewing the patient so you will have chair. Higher up the totem pole means more opportunity to sit down.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

THEBACKANDFORTH

2+ Year Member
Jun 5, 2017
308
432
Status
  1. Medical Student
If you get in, you should go.

I'm a third year who's planning on applying psych. I'm fairly certain my future life will be rewarding.

Med students love to humble brag about how hard they work, but in all honesty, nothing is that intellectually challenging. It just is a lot sometimes, especially if you're a bit of a procrastinator, because then you will inevitably end up with week-long non stop study binges. But there are a lot worse things in life.

FYI--You can certainly can get by with 4-6 hours of work per day on down weeks as long as you're okay with getting 80% average on the tests (hint--you should be). People who study for 12+ hours a day are killing themselves with dubious perfection.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Dr. Basketball

2+ Year Member
Feb 21, 2016
167
152
Status
  1. Medical Student
M2 here. Just wanted to second the student specific part. I study 6.5 days a week(by choice) but have a couple braniac classmates that take weekends off. Could I pass if I cut my studying down? Maybe, not willing to find out though. Also, this is not a humble brag. The fear of failure drives me and that's just how I do things. I enjoy the sense of urgency. Everyone gets their own rhythm of how they choose to study and what works for them. Also note that for me, and a lot of my classmates, how I studied in undergrad is not at all how I study now. I think you have a valid question, it's just hard to gauge. But I think it might be better going in with the grind mentality and overstudying at first until you find what works for you. Best of luck!

*Edited to fix a typo
 

Angus Avagadro

SDN Lifetime Donor
2+ Year Member
Aug 3, 2018
2,193
5,076
Status
  1. Attending Physician
How much you study is a very individual thing. My wife, an elite student, went to class to socialize at an east coast university. She graduated in the top 10%. I had to take a more blue collar approach and studied 4 - 6 hrs a day, we had mandatory attendance, and 8 hrs a day on the weekends. It's doable, but is very time consuming. Where I taught, our first semester of med school was like 32 credit hrs to give some perspective.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

TwoHighways

Membership Revoked
Removed
2+ Year Member
Dec 11, 2017
597
1,161
At first it sucks. Then you get used to it. Then you are astounded by how little you know about anything lulz.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: 1 user
Aug 7, 2020
114
135
Status
  1. Medical Student
Just completed 1st block and been scoring in the upper 90th percentile on all my tests. But it's pass/fail so, lol. its easy so far.
 
About the Ads

slowthai

holding a barbell.
7+ Year Member
Jul 11, 2013
1,877
4,339
In my gaff
In his heyday, @Foot Fetish would jump in this thread posting paragraphs about how he pulls straight 100s on all his exams with 10-12 hour days. Miss him. Wonder what field he ended up in. I know he was originally DR, then derm, but he ended up switching to something else I think

Edit: He was actually still derm but with a "start a cosmetic boutique and make beaucoup bucks" backup LOL
 
Last edited:
  • Like
  • Haha
Reactions: 2 users

altblue

5+ Year Member
Feb 11, 2014
1,859
2,449
Status
  1. Medical Student
In his heyday, @Foot Fetish would jump in this thread posting paragraphs about how he pulls straight 100s on all his exams with 10-12 hour days. Miss him. Wonder what field he ended up in. I know he was originally DR, then derm, but he ended up switching to something else I think
He's probably lamenting the fact he never went to pod school
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

drducky.

2+ Year Member
Nov 13, 2018
237
417
Status
  1. Medical Student (Accepted)
My personal experience: med school is not difficult to just pass...but if you aim for competitive specialties (neurosurgery, integrated...etc) or to rank among the top 10 of your class...it is hard.
If all you have to show for your 12hr/day grind is remembering random garbage from phd’s to get top 10, then it’s def not worth when that time could’ve been spent on boards or even research.
 

frenchyn

7+ Year Member
Dec 10, 2012
573
644
Status
If all you have to show for your 12hr/day grind is remembering random garbage from phd’s to get top 10, then it’s def not worth when that time could’ve been spent on boards or even research.
Or you can do well on all lmao...
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

ciestar

All grown up!
7+ Year Member
Sep 18, 2013
7,913
10,722
Status
  1. Resident [Any Field]
I prioritized my relationship over a lot and didn’t do super great in school. I passed everything, but didnt do great on step 1. Still got a lot of interviews and comfortably matched.

Studying for med school is really as much as you want to get out of it. You do not have to get 100s on every exam. If you’re true pass/fail you definitely don't.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

Damson

2+ Year Member
Nov 18, 2017
659
674
On The Move
Status
  1. Medical Student
Seems unranked pass/fail schools are less stressful, less competitive between peers, and allows more time dedicated to board prep.
 

THEBACKANDFORTH

2+ Year Member
Jun 5, 2017
308
432
Status
  1. Medical Student
Seems unranked pass/fail schools are less stressful, less competitive between peers, and allows more time dedicated to board prep.

I did didactic at an unranked pass/fail and N=1 this was true. I would call the environment largely collaborative and supportive. Some people humbly did incredibly well, everybody pulled for our few struggling peers, and we shared resources on an open access google drive. I was able to be a comfortably bottom half student that didn't worry about memorizing the stupid details of some guest lecturer's 217 slide powerpoint, then turn around and get a decent Step with decent effort. This is how all schools should be and inevitably will.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

altblue

5+ Year Member
Feb 11, 2014
1,859
2,449
Status
  1. Medical Student
If all you have to show for your 12hr/day grind is remembering random garbage from phd’s to get top 10, then it’s def not worth when that time could’ve been spent on boards or even research.
That's my philosophy. Do modest board prep in advance, do research I enjoy, triage out PhD infodumps or MD clinical minutiae, pass comfortably, and enjoy life
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

ohmanwaddup

2+ Year Member
May 13, 2016
1,011
1,406
Status
  1. Medical Student
Definitely, but I still feel there are still aspects of medical school that can be challenging. Like, I felt wrapping my head around sodium/water balance and their Tx were as challenging as some aspects of organic chemistry. Heart physiology can be hard to grasp for some if they don't have a solid physio or physics background too
Struggle super hard with cardio phys and im a third year.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
Jun 13, 2015
65
7
Status
  1. Pre-Medical
thanks for the responses everyone. I'm more motivated to study hard for the MCAT and apply to med school now :)
 
  • Love
Reactions: 1 user

altblue

5+ Year Member
Feb 11, 2014
1,859
2,449
Status
  1. Medical Student
thanks for the responses everyone. I'm more motivated to study hard for the MCAT and apply to med school now :)
Best of luck...! and don't let us all scare you. As long as you're decently smart and willing to work hard, med school is very doable
 
Oct 5, 2020
15
5
Status
  1. Medical Student
Hi everyone,
I was pre-med and have been thinking about getting my **** together in order to apply to med school but I do struggle with stress a bit. So, I wanted to ask, how hard is medical school anyways?
I didn't study much in college, but I did study for 5-6 hours a day 5-6 times a week in my post-bacc and I did well, got all A's. I think I did get one A- but that's a long story that I don't want to get into here. I didn't study much for a genetics exam and that is why I got an A- in that class.
How much of a jump is it from college if you are taking like 13-15 credits/semester at a state school? Honestly, my post-bacc was challenging. I'm not sure if I could go at a much higher pace for very long without burning out.
Please help because I am considering a couple of other careers and would like to know people's experience with med school.
Thanks!

So, the problem with medical school is that, if you don't study consistently, the material piles up and it's essentially impossible to catch up.
But honestly, if you study, actively learning for 3 hours every day, you should be fine.
Of course, some days you might need to study some more and some other days even less, but yeah, that's the idea.

Also, I think the difficulty in medical school also has to do with your own personal goals. What I mean by this, if you're a student who is dead-set ona residency such as derm, plastics, ent, ortho, etc, then you might have a lot of pressure to "be in the top".
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Oct 9, 2020
37
132
Status
  1. Medical Student
So, the problem with medical school is that, if you don't study consistently, the material piles up and it's essentially impossible to catch up.
But honestly, if you study, actively learning for 3 hours every day, you should be fine.
Of course, some days you might need to study some more and some other days even less, but yeah, that's the idea.

Also, I think the difficulty in medical school also has to do with your own personal goals. What I mean by this, if you're a student who is dead-set ona residency such as derm, plastics, ent, ortho, etc, then you might have a lot of pressure to "be in the top".

This! A few hours of active studying a day is so much more efficient than being in a chair 12 hrs a day studying passively or inefficiently.

Also, I hate the pancake analogy they use to describe medical school, but it’s true. You have to stay on top of each day’s work, or it will quickly become an insurmountable mountain before exams.
 
Aug 20, 2019
595
683
Status
  1. Non-Student
First two years will destroy you mentally, third year will destroy you physically and 4th year is the light at the end of the tunnel.

Discipline is more important than motivation.

I guess residency is Dante's inferno.
 

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.
About the Ads