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How helpful are mindmaps during years 1 and 2?

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by barb, May 21, 2002.

  1. barb

    barb Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Nov 19, 2001
    Los Angeles
    When I was going on interviews, I noticed a lot of mindmaps being used in problem-based learning. Almost every class I visited where this type of learning was going on, I saw these drawn on the board. I was wondering how helpful are these and how often do you typically use them?
     
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  3. focker

    focker Member 7+ Year Member

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    Chicago, IL
    I have a curriculum that uses PBL, but I have no idea what a mindmap is.
     
  4. barb

    barb Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Nov 19, 2001
    Los Angeles
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by focker:
    <strong>I have a curriculum that uses PBL, but I have no idea what a mindmap is.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">An example of a mindmap would be when you put the topic in the center of the page and have ideas stemming out of it rather than in sequential, outline form. This allows you to insert ideas as they come to you. The reason I'm asking is I learned a new software program that makes mindmap making totally easy (not that it's hard) and having it on the computer, saves so much time so you don't have to re-write notes. Also, you can change from diagram form to outline form by just clicking a button.
     
  5. leorl

    leorl Physician Moderator Emeritus Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    Jan 2, 2001
    I have seen all sorts of weird mindmapping, although it isn't too common yet. You start in the center and either web out, or spiral out. I've seen kids who turn their paper all sorts of ways while taking notes to complete the mindmaps. For those of us who aren't used to it, it looks really odd. But apparently, it really works if you can get your mind to think like that, and those kids who do mindmapping generally get the higher marks.
     
  6. UCMonkey

    UCMonkey Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Aug 26, 2001
    Cincinnati, OH
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by focker:
    <strong>I have a curriculum that uses PBL, but I have no idea what a mindmap is.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">I think at many schools, its called concept mapping, if that helps. From what I saw (briefly) on my tours at interviews, it looked like a jumbled mess of info, but whatever works for you, I suppose.
     
  7. focker

    focker Member 7+ Year Member

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    Apr 12, 2001
    Chicago, IL
    They don't teach us anything like that here at Northwestern. They don't advocate any particular system for learning or organizing information. Of course we have lecture in addition to PBL, so organizing info from PBL isn't so important.
     
  8. Dodge This

    Dodge This Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Apr 11, 2001
    Most of us haven't been taught to think like this. I find them disorganized, cluttered, and useless. I end up frustrating myself trying to make them because I just can't change the way I reason through problems, and if I want to go back and look at it later to find specific info it ends up being more trouble than it's worth. I don't know why they try to impose these things on people so late into their academic careers. If The Powers That Be want us to use mind maps now, they should have been teaching it in elementary school.

    Sequential organized outline = good
    Weird connected webbing and circles = not so good
     
  9. Smurfette

    Smurfette Antagonized by Azrael Administrator Physician 10+ Year Member

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    Jun 6, 2001
    I've never had a class where this was used--in college OR med school. In med school, I find tables/charts much more useful (for memorization purposes as well as for my own understanding). However, it is usually up to us med students to create the charts or tables--the profs usually don't present things in such concise formats :mad:
     
  10. barb

    barb Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Nov 19, 2001
    Los Angeles
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Dodge This:
    <strong>Most of us haven't been taught to think like this. I find them disorganized, cluttered, and useless. I end up frustrating myself trying to make them because I just can't change the way I reason through problems, and if I want to go back and look at it later to find specific info it ends up being more trouble than it's worth. I don't know why they try to impose these things on people so late into their academic careers. If The Powers That Be want us to use mind maps now, they should have been teaching it in elementary school.

    Sequential organized outline = good
    Weird connected webbing and circles = not so good</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">I totally hear what you're saying. I've never used these concept maps ever in my life, that's why I was kind of freaked out when I saw so many of them on whiteboards in classrooms when I was going on interviews. I never saw them in lecture halls, just in those small classrooms where small group learning takes place. I have never been comfortable using concept maps when learning anything and have always resorted back to the traditional outline form of note-taking.
    However, during my time off before I start med school, I've been teaching 7th grade and as teachers, we're being pushed to encourage all types of learning (just as med schools are moving towards PBL - middle schools are also moving towards this). As part of this, we were taught this software called "Inspiration" which allows students to create concept maps very easily and switch from diagram form to a more organized table-like form - to the traditional outline form with the click of a button.
    Although I was very uncomfortable with it at first, it actually makes learning (especially if you're doing case studies and PBL) much easier and you don't have to give up the outlines you're use to - it creates the outline automatically as you brainstorm symptoms, diagnoses, etc using the concept map.
     

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